A Revelation - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 19 Old 04-26-2012, 10:21 PM Thread Starter
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A Revelation

So before Hunny had Sugar this year, I was planning on breeding her to a fox trotter stud next spring. I thought she was the perfect horse! She was amazing in my eyes. After she had Sugar this year, I was planning on breeding her still next spring to the same stud, because Sugar does look so good. I thought that with how amazing this stud is he could offset any bad points Hunny has.

Well, I stood back and took a good look at Hunny today. I really looked at her with the eyes of a potential breeder, not an owner and I saw flaws. Not even a few flaws, I saw a lot. I realized that while she is pretty, and she is a darling, she is not breeding stock. I'm surprised at how wonderfully formed Sugar is with how funky Hunnies legs are. I think they actually may be double jointed if that is possible in horses because sometimes she can stand in the weirdest ways possible and be comfortable like that. But it really hit me, she is not good enough to breed, no matter how awesome I think she is.

So as a horse owner and previously potential breeder, I would like to offer up a peanut of advice. Look at your horse from the eyes of a breeder, not an owner, and decide if it is really good enough to breed. If you breed your horse, will the foal contribute to the breed in any way? I really thought about it today. I LOVE fox trotters, but I don't think that a foal out of Hunny, no matter how good the stud is, would significantly contribute to the breed.

So my new decision is to start saving for a foal from the breeders that own the stud. In a few years, hopefully less then five LOL, I might be able to afford one of their foals. They are wonderful breeders with amazing horses that fit the exact discipline I enjoy. Why breed a horse when I can buy one that fits my criteria perfectly?

The moral of the story is this: Think before you breed, weigh out EVERY aspect. Where will the foal be in 10 years? If I don't own it will it be worth enough that it won't go to slaughter? Why am I breeding? Is it because I want a foal out of my horse? Will this baby make a contribution to the breed in any way? Your horse may have a perfect personality, but how does the body look? Don't breed if you can buy a horse or foal that is already perfect. The world is a pasture, and there is more then one perfect horse in it.
Wallaby, texasgal, smrobs and 6 others like this.

You have to learn how to fall before you can learn how to ride~
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post #2 of 19 Old 04-26-2012, 10:28 PM
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Very well put and good for you!

BTW, where are our new pictures of the darling Sugar?????

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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post #3 of 19 Old 04-26-2012, 10:57 PM
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Beautifully done, excellent advice!

Pssh.I didn't pick up the wrong lead
It's called a counter canter...
...A very advanced maneuver.
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post #4 of 19 Old 04-26-2012, 10:59 PM
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Good for you!

"The greatest pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with
him and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself too."

-Samuel Butler
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post #5 of 19 Old 04-27-2012, 12:39 AM
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Yay! I love it when people stop and think of the greater good. It shows you have great character and a respect for the horses! <3


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post #6 of 19 Old 04-27-2012, 01:58 AM
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I so totally agree with what you said. I wish more people would think long term this way.
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post #7 of 19 Old 04-27-2012, 07:35 AM Thread Starter
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I recently wrote two papers for school about horse slaughter. One was an argument paper for humane horse slaughter that took a basis with equine psychology advice and some great ideas from Temple Grandin, and the other paper was about the new proposed bill to ban horse slaughter. In my research I found ONE thing that forces us to slaughter horses: non-selective, unnecessary, and long-term unplanned breeding. There are so many unwanted horses already that it is RIDICULOUS. Why on earth would I contribute is my thought. Yes Hunny is a fantastic horse, and I think she would throw me a wonderful foal, especially with her disposition, but she isn't registered, I cannot find out who her parents are, and while she has an amazing fox trot, there is something wrong where she forgets to step or she doesn't move her leg fast enough and she sometimes trips because her back leg will stumble.

It irritates the snot out of me when people breed just because they love their horse. If the breeding is well thought out, their horse is conformationally perfect, has a good attitude, comes from a recognizable line of horses, and has a job, I am fine with breeding. But breeding for the sake of breeding (as in back yard breeders who just want to make a buck) NEEDS to be stopped. The only way to do that is through education. Britain has succeeded in this. I found some information on how the UK deals with horse slaughter and it really is humane, very structured, and a meticulous process. The UK only has 3 slaughterhouses that deal with only a few thousand horses/year. Yearly, the US is exporting about 100,000 horses for slaughter in Canada and Mexico. That is crazy. With carefully selected breeding plans, campaigns to educate every horse person, maybe a breeding permit before horses are bred, and requirements for horses bred to be registered, maybe we could cut back on the number of unwanted horses. The value of horses would rise, and the number sent to slaughter would drop. Sounds like a good deal to me!
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You have to learn how to fall before you can learn how to ride~
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post #8 of 19 Old 04-27-2012, 09:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cowgirl928 View Post
I recently wrote two papers for school about horse slaughter. One was an argument paper for humane horse slaughter that took a basis with equine psychology advice and some great ideas from Temple Grandin, and the other paper was about the new proposed bill to ban horse slaughter. In my research I found ONE thing that forces us to slaughter horses: non-selective, unnecessary, and long-term unplanned breeding. There are so many unwanted horses already that it is RIDICULOUS. Why on earth would I contribute is my thought. Yes Hunny is a fantastic horse, and I think she would throw me a wonderful foal, especially with her disposition, but she isn't registered, I cannot find out who her parents are, and while she has an amazing fox trot, there is something wrong where she forgets to step or she doesn't move her leg fast enough and she sometimes trips because her back leg will stumble.

It irritates the snot out of me when people breed just because they love their horse. If the breeding is well thought out, their horse is conformationally perfect, has a good attitude, comes from a recognizable line of horses, and has a job, I am fine with breeding. But breeding for the sake of breeding (as in back yard breeders who just want to make a buck) NEEDS to be stopped. The only way to do that is through education. Britain has succeeded in this. I found some information on how the UK deals with horse slaughter and it really is humane, very structured, and a meticulous process. The UK only has 3 slaughterhouses that deal with only a few thousand horses/year. Yearly, the US is exporting about 100,000 horses for slaughter in Canada and Mexico. That is crazy. With carefully selected breeding plans, campaigns to educate every horse person, maybe a breeding permit before horses are bred, and requirements for horses bred to be registered, maybe we could cut back on the number of unwanted horses. The value of horses would rise, and the number sent to slaughter would drop. Sounds like a good deal to me!
Great papers!!!!

And what a mature young lady.......

I am proud to know you.....so to speak on the net.

Ripper
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post #9 of 19 Old 04-27-2012, 09:48 AM
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One more thing to add.

Some of these registries are a joke.

Be selective with those.
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post #10 of 19 Old 04-27-2012, 02:00 PM Thread Starter
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I'm attached to fox trotters ripper :) lol so the MFTHBA is currently the only registry I affiliate myself with! Oh and thank you my dear! I am delighted to know you through the net as well. If you're ever in north dakota shoot me a pm!

You have to learn how to fall before you can learn how to ride~
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