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saw something the other day, got me thinking [stallion handling]

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  • Mares on a rampage because of stallion

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    09-15-2013, 07:01 AM
  #21
Started
I Lived on a ranch with a Cutting bred Stallion. That horse was the sweetest horse I have ever met. Always mined his Ps and Qs and always wanted to please. He would sometimes give me this look when I was in his field that said "Can you please step out of my field so I can act like an idiot?" As soon as I left he would go on a spazy rampage calling to the mares, but he always waited.
At one point he somehow got out with the mares foals and geldings (and a random mule and gelding also ended up in the same field. I still don't know whos horses they where and how all the horses ended up in one field) and the geldings where attacking him. His owner walked out there with a halter slipped it on and he went from stud to half asleep instantly. Cutting bred horses tend to me calmer than most (I own an arab but I don't trust arab stallions at all) I have noticed.
     
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    09-21-2013, 09:18 PM
  #22
Weanling
I don't believe you can trust any horse completely.. EVER. So.. having a child sitting on the horses back.. probably not a big deal IMO. Others will think otherwise... A horse that has had thousands of rides could be unpredictable in a SECOND. So if you are worried about the child being on a the horse with someone holding them... I don't see how this would be any different than a child riding ANY horse. Its dangerous. Period.
     
    09-22-2013, 06:12 AM
  #23
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostwindAppaloosa    
I don't believe you can trust any horse completely.. EVER. So.. having a child sitting on the horses back.. probably not a big deal IMO. Others will think otherwise... A horse that has had thousands of rides could be unpredictable in a SECOND. So if you are worried about the child being on a the horse with someone holding them... I don't see how this would be any different than a child riding ANY horse. Its dangerous. Period.
See to me it's risk reduction.

Stallions are more likely to act out than most geldings. I don't like to see children on mares, but that's because all the mares I've ever had have been a little nutty [the super-quiet one is a stubborn cow and a child would be incapable of handling her]. I also don't like to see children on young horses.

The only horse I would willingly put a child on [assuming said child is not an experienced rider] would be a dead-broke older gelding. My boy has packed many children around on-lead. My young horse on the other hand is easily as quiet, MUCH easier to handle, but is a young red Thoroughbred filly. I do not allow children NEAR her. Why? Because for as quiet as she is, she's still more likely to dangerously flip out than my 18 year old extremely hard-mouthed retired event horse. Because HE doesn't spook. He just doesn't always stop very reliably!
     
    09-22-2013, 07:46 AM
  #24
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue eyed pony    
See to me it's risk reduction.

Stallions are more likely to act out than most geldings. I don't like to see children on mares, but that's because all the mares I've ever had have been a little nutty [the super-quiet one is a stubborn cow and a child would be incapable of handling her]. I also don't like to see children on young horses.

The only horse I would willingly put a child on [assuming said child is not an experienced rider] would be a dead-broke older gelding. My boy has packed many children around on-lead. My young horse on the other hand is easily as quiet, MUCH easier to handle, but is a young red Thoroughbred filly. I do not allow children NEAR her. Why? Because for as quiet as she is, she's still more likely to dangerously flip out than my 18 year old extremely hard-mouthed retired event horse. Because HE doesn't spook. He just doesn't always stop very reliably!

See that's what Im talking about. Each horse is an individual. You have to make smart decisions based upon each horses temperament. Honestly I have ridden stallions that I would trust more than geldings... individual cases of course. It really depends on the horse.
Some are spooky. Some are stubborn. Each has a different personality.
     
    09-22-2013, 10:19 AM
  #25
Trained
I think it has a lot to do with a person's experience, though, as to the risks they are and are not willing to take. The few stallions I've had anything to do with, while generally quiet horses [even the Jazz son was nice with people, but with other horses he was a nightmare, extremely studdy and territorial], were not the sort of horses you would ever trust with a child. Even carefully supervised and with a capable, experienced person on the other end of a lead.

I didn't personally witness the following story, my mother did, but:

The stallion was a very quiet, very sweet gentlemanly Thoroughbred. He wasn't an easy colt to begin with, by all accounts, but somewhere down the line he was taught some very nice ground manners. He was easy to handle for everything, including breeding, and took his time to sweet-talk his mares.

One day he was brought into the breeding yard to cover a mare, but she had fallen for the teaser and didn't want a bar of him. He was put back in his yard and let loose, and he WENT his handler. Tooth and nail, out for blood. The stallion handler at this particular large-scale farm was a very athletic young man and this was bloody lucky as the fellow scaled the fence just in time to keep his life!

Why did this sweet, well-mannered stud snap? Who knows? Perhaps he saw the handler as a rival for the mare's affection. Perhaps he was frustrated because he'd gotten himself going only to be torn away from a mare that was heavily in season. [the men on the forum would know THAT feeling, all hot and ready and then told no!]

Either way, stories like that and the other one I shared are why I don't trust stallions. Ever. No matter how quiet or well-mannered.

My experience and that of experienced people I know has not been conducive to willingly trusting a stallion with a child!
     
    09-23-2013, 06:28 AM
  #26
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by apachiedragon    
The short answer? Even though a stallion might be well-behaved enough that a child COULD ride them, their parents should not LET them. It comes down to good parenting. If a stallion decides to blow up, for whatever reason, even if it's never happened before, a child isn't going to have the experience or the strength to stop a potential wreck. And it's the parents' job to know that and be responsible.
I agree with this.
I have a well-trained, well-behaved and good natured stallion. He is as kind a horse as ever lived.
But NOT a gelding.
I would trust this horse more than any other horse I have ever owned.
But at the same time, he always is aware of the mares, and there is always something else potentially going on that he is aware of that I might not be.
I think a stallion must always be treated with respect, always understanding that he IS a stallion, -
Meaning that he needs to be handled with greater awareness, alertness, and attention.
Although I could put a child up on my horse, I never would.
     
    09-23-2013, 10:54 AM
  #27
Started
Quote:
Stallions are more likely to act out than most geldings. I don't like to see children on mares, but that's because all the mares I've ever had have been a little nutty [the super-quiet one is a stubborn cow and a child would be incapable of handling her]. I also don't like to see children on young horses.
I agree with the stallion bit. I also agree with treating each horse as an individual. The best horses I have ever owned have been mares, and the craziest were geldings. I would put a child on my young appy mare before I put her on any of the geldings I've owned. I also agree that kids should stay away from horses that are green, very young and stallions. I HATE the pictures of toddlers perched on 2 year olds, with captions like, "look, my two year old is so quiet it can give babies pony rides". Its irresponsible of the horse owner, and terrible parenting.

I have known a few stallions that were excessively quiet, well mannered. One was thoroughbred, and I could trail ride him with mares in heat, and he never batted an eyelash. He was that way until the day he died. The next stallion freaked out one day while being brushed and broke my leg. As has been said, stallions have different priorities than geldings, and many of them can 'wake up' at just a whiff of "mare in heat" on the breeze.
     
    09-24-2013, 10:56 PM
  #28
Yearling
You know what upsets me more than anything about this, is that once again we have a horse being broken in ridden when he is still just a baby.
     
    09-25-2013, 12:27 AM
  #29
Yearling
As said before, it is very, very common for 2 year olds to be broke and ridden lightly. Every horse I've ever known has been started lightly as a two year old. Not a single one has ever had lameness issues(barring injuries), and many are in their 20's.

As to the stallion issue, I would never put a child on a stallion.
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    09-25-2013, 11:25 AM
  #30
Yearling
My stallion was broken to ride at 10 and guess who was the first to ride him my 9 year old sister, he did a hell of a lot of work before having a rider on him though. If one of my boys wasn't better mannered then any mare or gelding no matter what happened then they would be gelded asap. My now retired stallion is better behaved then any mare or gelding I have ever met. As in you can walk him up to/past in season mares and away on a webbing head collar and he was cool as a cucumber not so much of a whinny. My boys are excepted to be child safe too otherwise off with the family jewels as to me temperament is just as important as conformation. I wouldn't call my retired by unpredictable and I trust him more then any other mare or gelding I have ever met.
My boy loves my little sister (please excuse the lack of helmet it was the only time she ever rode him with out but it is the only time I had taken photos and he is retired from any sort of work now).





He all so passed on his temperament onto his foals, one is a kids pony another has done lots of young handler classes and our foal has a perfect temperament.


     

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