Stud Colt
 
 

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Stud Colt

This is a discussion on Stud Colt within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Colt pawing and charging
  • What's a stud colt

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    02-16-2012, 09:05 PM
  #1
Yearling
Stud Colt

Alright, in your experience, what is the youngest you have seen a stud colt acting studish? Also, what to you is being "studdish" to you?

This is just a general question for information, at least I'm thinking it goes here.
     
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    02-16-2012, 11:22 PM
  #2
Banned
I had a paint cold that started acting what I call studish at about 1 1/2 maybe a little younger. And to ME studish is nipping, thinking they are all tough guy and acting more agressive then most colts and pushy and stuff. They tend to test you too
     
    02-16-2012, 11:41 PM
  #3
Started
I bought a stud colt once that was about 5-6 months and he was a nasty little thing. He would charge,bite,rear up,kick out,try to get loose every time you led him,tried to fight with other horses,would run right over you. He got snipped pretty quick ;)
     
    02-16-2012, 11:48 PM
  #4
Weanling
I have owned two stud colts, who were complete polar opposites. My first colt was pure Arab and about seven or eight months he started to get pushy, mouthy, and wanted to rear up for no good reason. Three days after surgery it was all gone!!! He made a great gelding.

My Saddlebred/Arab never acted studdy, accept he would 'talk' to the girls. He liked to call to any mares, but they always throught he was a twerp. One call and he was done. He never got mouthy, never got pushy, never showed off for the girls, was easily handled my daughter who was 7 or 8 at the time. He was a great stallion then I had to go and geld him at 22 months old... and he turned into a lousy gelding. The last nine years have been plagued with dominace issues, confidence issues, showing off for all the girls human and horse alike, and just generally being a butt. I liked him so much better as a stallion!!!!
     
    02-17-2012, 12:03 AM
  #5
Green Broke
If being studdy is nipping, rearing, trying to get away while being led, being pushy and mouthy, then my colt was born that way! And I got him gelded at 5 months and he is STILL that way and he is 19 months old.

I never considered that studdy. Just rude and disrespectful. I have never seen him exhibit any sexual type behavior. Well, unless climbing up on another gelding in play is considered mounting, but it was a play behavior. He will also dangle his, um, "thingie" out and bob it around. I know he was gelded at 5 months because I was there when the vet removed them. So it that normal for him to be, um, bobbing? Maybe my guy has extra testosterone being produced somewhere else in his body?

He's my first foal, so I don't really know what is normal behavior and what isn't for a young colt/gelding.

Now if "studdy" is more like showing interest in mares, then my neighbor had one that was trying to mount his mom at 7 months! She didn't actually get him gelded until 9 months. It's a miracle there wasn't an unplanned pregnancy there I suppose.
     
    02-17-2012, 12:10 AM
  #6
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piaffe    
I bought a stud colt once that was about 5-6 months and he was a nasty little thing. He would charge,bite,rear up,kick out,try to get loose every time you led him,tried to fight with other horses,would run right over you. He got snipped pretty quick ;)
Quote:
Originally Posted by yadlim    
I have owned two stud colts, who were complete polar opposites. My first colt was pure Arab and about seven or eight months he started to get pushy, mouthy, and wanted to rear up for no good reason. Three days after surgery it was all gone!!! He made a great gelding.
So did getting them gelding almost instantly help with those behaviors?

Because it didn't do a thing for my guy. He was rude before and he is rude now. I know gelding is not training and my guy still needs training, but I honestly did not see any miracle change at all after getting him gelded at 5 months.

I am still battling pushy, rude, mouthy, testing behavior.
     
    02-17-2012, 12:12 AM
  #7
Weanling
Yes, some geldings never stop acting 'studdy'. There is a very very slim chance that your vet did not get all the glands etc that produce testosterone, but it is possible. In the past, horses could be what is called "proud cut" where they were allowed to keep all the hormones, but were steralized. This got you a stallion in behavior without the foals.

Stallions are not that much different from geldings... they bond a bit closer with their humans, play a bit rougher with the other boys, show off a bit for the girls. They are also a bit more agressive - but a good stallion is no more difficult to deal with than a good gelding. The only reason my boy is gelded is because I have to keep him at a boarding stable and am not willing to pay extra money because people are afraid of the word stallion.
     
    02-17-2012, 12:22 AM
  #8
Green Broke
You know, my guy has a very thick neck for a young gelding too. I had a trainer out to help me with groundwork and they were surprised he was gelded already because of how muscular he was, particularly his neck. Very interesting! I have no doubt he is 100% a gelding, but getting him gelded didn't change his behavior at all.

But in some ways that makes me feel a bit better because I am always banging my head against the wall with him. Maybe it isn't just me after all.
     
    02-17-2012, 12:25 AM
  #9
Yearling
One of the ladies I used to trail ride and drill team with had a colt who was a monster as a foal, she got him at three months and he would charge, kick, paw, bite, etc at horses and people alike. She gelded him at 5 months and he is now a sweetheart towards people, but will talk to and drop around any horses he is used to and will thump his belly a few times before putting his equipment away. He is such a weirdo, lol.

I've had a couple colts I bought as unhandled horses and kept from the time they were weanlings to over two years old, they never acted studdy with bad behavior and never looked at a mare, other than my first colt trying to nurse off one for a couple days when I brought him home off his mama, unsuccessfully, poor thing almost got his brains kicked out for trying!

Ladybug, is your colt already exhibiting symptoms of being a problem child?

I've also seen a lot of very young foals jump up on their dams, it may look like they were trying to mount, but my filly did it all the time in play.
     
    02-17-2012, 01:10 AM
  #10
Started
Boys naturally are more mouthy, nippy, and tend to be rougher in play. Not all, we had one colt growing we raised that was a bit of an odd ball... from the time he was born, past being gelded to even this day he has never changed. The worse thing he ever did was chew off a mare's tail right after being weaned (but he had a fellow partner in crime). No misbehaving, talking to girls, pretending to be a stallion, or other bad behaviors while his tail-munching-partner-in-crime was the complete opposite. Both were gelded at 6 months old (half brothers born one week apart), and one thought he was always hot stuff. From stallion talking, leg strikes, intense interest in mares in heat and aggression to other horses. Fortunately, he had manners to people, but a whole different attitude to other horses (even to his own pasture mates he was unpredictable).

Each colt is born with their own unique personality, correcting poor manners and reinforcing positive behavior while they are young is the best way to deal with colts in the long run, IMO.
     

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