Stud Colt - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 35 Old 02-17-2012, 03:08 PM
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In my opinion if you have a studdy/rude colt and then geld and still have rude behavior I think this is more of a handling/training issue.

I have 4 mares and 2 geldings one of which I had gelded ....the other came gelded.......the mares are all business while the "boys" tend to play, nip, rear and chase each other.

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post #32 of 35 Old 02-17-2012, 06:30 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by trainerunlimited View Post
One of the ladies I used to trail ride and drill team with had a colt who was a monster as a foal, she got him at three months and he would charge, kick, paw, bite, etc at horses and people alike. She gelded him at 5 months and he is now a sweetheart towards people, but will talk to and drop around any horses he is used to and will thump his belly a few times before putting his equipment away. He is such a weirdo, lol.

I've had a couple colts I bought as unhandled horses and kept from the time they were weanlings to over two years old, they never acted studdy with bad behavior and never looked at a mare, other than my first colt trying to nurse off one for a couple days when I brought him home off his mama, unsuccessfully, poor thing almost got his brains kicked out for trying!

Ladybug, is your colt already exhibiting symptoms of being a problem child?

I've also seen a lot of very young foals jump up on their dams, it may look like they were trying to mount, but my filly did it all the time in play.
I'm not so sure it is being "study". The few times he can actually get near me without Lena interferring he rubs his head all over me. Also kind of aggressive in a way he likes to paw at me, almost climbing up into my lap. Lmao. I just think he needs a lesson.

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Originally Posted by Alfie92 View Post
A lot of people say if you leave them the horse will mature better as he will have the testosterone in his body. I dont know if this is true or not....
Im defo going to have him gelded i have no intentions on keeping him as a stud
I've had a gentleman tell me to keep from gelding as much as you can as it helps with muscle development. Kind of like when you spay or neuter a dog it gets lazy afterward? Lmao.



I mostly started this thread because of curiousity. One colt I had a few years back didn't start acting studish until about 6 months of age. At first he was just being playful with the geldings, but then he actually started rearing up on me and others, also trying to mount the mares. (Never succeeded as they didn't much appreciate that.)
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post #33 of 35 Old 02-18-2012, 10:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Ladybug2001 View Post
I'm not so sure it is being "study". The few times he can actually get near me without Lena interferring he rubs his head all over me. Also kind of aggressive in a way he likes to paw at me, almost climbing up into my lap. Lmao. I just think he needs a lesson.



I've had a gentleman tell me to keep from gelding as much as you can as it helps with muscle development. Kind of like when you spay or neuter a dog it gets lazy afterward? Lmao.



I mostly started this thread because of curiousity. One colt I had a few years back didn't start acting studish until about 6 months of age. At first he was just being playful with the geldings, but then he actually started rearing up on me and others, also trying to mount the mares. (Never succeeded as they didn't much appreciate that.)
Actually, quite the contrary. If you want to INCREASE height, you geld before the horse reaches sexual maturity, since testosterone levels are one of the factors that promote growth plate closure. So, basically, if you geld before "puberty" the growth plates will take longer to close, thus a colt left entire can end up a couple of inches shorter than one not (all factors considered equal).

Now, who's to say that there aren't other factors....environment, etc. Even full siblings who are treated exactly the same can end up disproving the theory, but there is some evidence to back it.

Personally, I geld all non-stallion prospect colts early, while they are still on the dam, if possible.

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post #34 of 35 Old 02-18-2012, 10:40 PM
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The best way to think about it is the longer you leave the testosterone, the "bigger" the horse gets because he alternates between growing UP and growing OUT. When you geld, you don't get as much "out" and in turn that contributes more to "up". It's actually a problem with larger breed dogs and why they advise waiting until at least a year to have them cut. They can suffer serious joint problems from shooting up too fast.

I think sometimes it can be difficult to determine what is actually studdy behavior and what is just mischievous colt behavior. I worked for a carnival and she bred her ponies and those colts were SO bratty. Constantly nipping and rearing, always mounting the mares at a couple months old. I made sure they kept their manners around humans, and they certainly calmed down as they got gelded, but as young colts, every last one of them was just a terror to those poor broodmares! I attributed at least half of it to being Shetland/Welsh ponies.

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post #35 of 35 Old 02-18-2012, 10:53 PM
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In my opinion if you have a studdy/rude colt and then geld and still have rude behavior I think this is more of a handling/training issue.
I'm sure you're right. My baby is a brat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladybug2001 View Post

I've had a gentleman tell me to keep from gelding as much as you can as it helps with muscle development. Kind of like when you spay or neuter a dog it gets lazy afterward? Lmao.
I'm not sure if I believe that. At least not with my gelding. He was gelded at 5 months. He is 19 months now. He is 15 hands, over 1000 lbs and looks like he is going to be a tank. He is already more muscular looking than his momma (she's a Fox Trotter but his sire is a QH).

My theory is nutrition has a lot to do with growth.

I have a friend with a Paint colt who is several months older than my gelding. Hers is still intact. He is very non-muscular and narrow compared to my gelding who is younger and only 1/2 stock horse. But I think I am feeding pretty close to optimal nutritionally. Maybe that's where all the attitude comes from as well.
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