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twins

This is a discussion on twins within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Can a mare have twins?
  • Twins in horses

 
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    06-15-2009, 04:02 PM
  #1
Weanling
twins

I have a qusetion about twin horses.do they usually survive?how likely is it that a mare will have twins?and when the twins do arrive are they going to be fraternal or paternal?i don't really understand twin foaling and stuff and I am really intrested in the process took to deiler twins.also how likely is it that both twins be born unharmed?
     
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    06-15-2009, 04:35 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Twins rarely survive, and often take the mare with them. If they do all come out unscathed, you're pretty much guaranteed to have very small and somewhat unhealthy foals.

Horses are flat out not designed to have twins. They only have enough room for one, so when two develop, they rob nutrients from each other. Sometimes one will survive, or be born ok, but the other will be sickly or more often then not die.

Twins should be avoided at absolutely ALL costs. It is a rather simple procedure to have your mare checked, and pinched off if the vet discovers she's twinned. Twins in horses are not cute, and almost always fatal for one of the parties involved.

Twins aren't born "identical". In my experience they're usually the same color, but with different markings. If they do survive, one is almost always bigger then the other.
     
    06-15-2009, 05:06 PM
  #3
Weanling
Miko said it perfectly. I have only heard of a few cases where both survived. You just don't want your horse to have twins because you will probably lose all two if not three horses.
     
    06-15-2009, 05:44 PM
  #4
Yearling
Also labor triggers the placenta to detach in horses. Unlike humans, in which it detahces after the baby is born (Normally). With twins, could you imagine the dilemma? One baby is born, while the other is waiting, not getting oxygen, helpless. Possibly will be a dummy foal, and have problems. Of course this is if everyone survives.

As Miko said, it should be avoided at all costs. This is why ultrasounds are so important. Unless you're ok with that risk.
     
    06-15-2009, 05:44 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacabreMikolaj    
Twins rarely survive, and often take the mare with them. If they do all come out unscathed, you're pretty much guaranteed to have very small and somewhat unhealthy foals.

Horses are flat out not designed to have twins. They only have enough room for one, so when two develop, they rob nutrients from each other. Sometimes one will survive, or be born ok, but the other will be sickly or more often then not die.

Twins should be avoided at absolutely ALL costs. It is a rather simple procedure to have your mare checked, and pinched off if the vet discovers she's twinned. Twins in horses are not cute, and almost always fatal for one of the parties involved.

Twins aren't born "identical". In my experience they're usually the same color, but with different markings. If they do survive, one is almost always bigger then the other.

How are twins not cute?i don't know if you mean they are ugly or what.and by pinched off you mean one or both of the embroys taken out?yes I read in horse and rider that all horses have diffrent markings because its like their fingerprints to them.yes horses arent designed to have twins just look at how big a horse gets with just one foal in there.i have only heard of one case in which twins were born and they both looked about the same but one was about a hand taller than the other.i was trying to get pictures on here of twins but I couldnt find any of the horses I was talking about.thnx for your info though!
     
    06-15-2009, 05:46 PM
  #6
Yearling
I think Miko meant that they are not cute because they are possibly so problematic. Even if a mare with two babies is cute, it is insanely rare that twins go off without a hitch. It is most definitely not two for one.
     
    06-15-2009, 05:48 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whipple    
Also labor triggers the placenta to detach in horses. Unlike humans, in which it detahces after the baby is born (Normally). With twins, could you imagine the dilemma? One baby is born, while the other is waiting, not getting oxygen, helpless. Possibly will be a dummy foal, and have problems. Of course this is if everyone survives.

As Miko said, it should be avoided at all costs. This is why ultrasounds are so important. Unless you're ok with that risk.

Yes I think ultrasounds are extremely important.thats why when I breed my mare im going to have one to see if she's taken,one about 5 months or so down the road,and then one close to birthing so I know she's all right.then ill probably have one of my friends who breeds horses for a living come down to help me if nesssecary when she is in labor.if my mare is going to have twins I will probably have the vet take one out if he decides that it might be dangerous.
     
    06-15-2009, 05:50 PM
  #8
Trained
It's all been said pretty well. Twins rarely make it compared to "normal horses". We had a set of twins at the clinic last year. One was tall, healthy, gorgeous. The other had misformed legs, was under weight, etc. The second foal had to have multiple surgeries to attempt to get his legs straight enough where he would be able to live a comfortable life. Though last time I saw him, he was running around, he was still much smaller. The mare had a very hard time during the birth and they had a nurse mare on sight just in case.

Constant contact with your vet during a pregnancy is a great way to make sure you do not have twins. It is very rare, but something to make sure you avoid.
     
    06-15-2009, 05:52 PM
  #9
Yearling
I might be mistaken, but you should probably get an ultrasound a bit closer to the breeding. That way your vet can pinch off one, if there are twins. At 5 months after, they'd be much bigger.
     
    06-15-2009, 06:24 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whipple    
I might be mistaken, but you should probably get an ultrasound a bit closer to the breeding. That way your vet can pinch off one, if there are twins. At 5 months after, they'd be much bigger.
about how far along should he check for twins?(you can tell this is my first breeding of my mare)im going to breed her next year so I have pleanty of time to get a good stud and get more info on breeding.
     

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