What are the chances? - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeding

What are the chances?

This is a discussion on What are the chances? within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        11-09-2010, 07:30 AM
      #21
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    100% if you buy one, no telling if you breed.
    Best answer here!

    If you want a specific color and gender then buy a foal. Then you are guaranteed to get the color and gender you want.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rbarlo32    
    Just to point out you don't nead to know about colours and genetics to be able to look after a foal.
    No, I suppose you do not need to. But there is this little thing called being responsible. Why would someone who does not even know the most basics about horse colors be trying to breed their horse? Even more so, why would they be trying to breed their horse for a specific color?

    Just like everything else, anyone can reproduce (humans, dogs, cats, etc), not everyone should though.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cowgirl101    
    The mare:She is a full paint, brown body. Her mane&tail is color based blond and red in it. (I have a photo of her in my profile).
    Serious question, did you post this to be silly or do you truly not know what color your mare is?

    I looked at the photo and brown is not the word I would pick for your mare.

    Unless the photo is bad she looks very chestnut/sorrel to me.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        11-09-2010, 11:26 AM
      #22
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rumonek    
    \

    You have a 50% chance for a colored foal or not if the stallion is heterozygous for spots. Since your mare is solid it doesn't matter that both of her parents had color, because she doesnt.

    This would depend on if the sire and dam was Tobis or not. Look at Cassie and then her filly.

    Tobiano is a dominant gene so if the horse carries a copy, it will have spots.
    If they are tobies they yes if the mare does not have it then it would be up to the stallion.
         
        11-09-2010, 11:35 AM
      #23
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cowgirl101    
    Know what, forget it. I was just wondering what the possibles were. I have 3 horses, I know how to care for them. Would you really think, I would get a animal I won't know how to care for?


    This has nothing to do with breeding. That is what people are trying to tell you. I now a lot of people who are very good at caring for a horse but should never breed.


    The mare:She is a full paint, brown body. Her mane&tail is color based blond and red in it. (I have a photo of her in my profile).

    This makes no seance.

    Stallion: He is white based, red dapple coat. His also full paint, his mane&tail is red.
    There is no such thing as a white based horse. They are either Red based or Black based. Everything past that are modifiers. Even a ALL white horse are not actually white. They are just expressing a paint pattern in is max form
         
        11-09-2010, 12:19 PM
      #24
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Chiilaa    
    Knowing how to care for a horse does not mean you have the knowledge to breed. There are thousands of unwanted horses needing homes, why not save one of those instead of adding to the issue when you have no business doing so?
    This is a VERY good point and one that was brought up over in a Horse Slaughter thread...which is why I asked you what you were planning on doing with the foal -- keeping, selling, etc? I think if you want to raise a foal and are knowledgeable enough to, then rescue one. My mare was one of 50 who were rescued from a backyard breeder who got in over her head and they were being neglected/starved because of it. There were a HANDFUL of foals on site that were rescued as well, my mare being the dam to 2 of them. If you want a foal, get a good trainer and go rescue one. There are too many unwanted horses in the world already.

    And not to be mean because I don't mean it that way at all (although you'll probably take it that way anyway since many on here tend to), but...you really do sound like you don't have a lot of color knowledge. I'm no breeder and I've only been a part of the horse world for 4 years now and a horse owner for 2 years, but even I know my basic color knowledge (sorrel, palomino, bay, buckskin vs. dun, etc. etc.). So it does concern me that you aren't as well versed and are thinking of breeding.
         
        11-09-2010, 12:21 PM
      #25
    Banned
    Knowing color of a horse DOESN'T mean I CAN'T for one!
    Oh my gosh, does anyone here know what color based is? It's a artist word.
    Color based=is the mean color!
    My mare is sorrel, how do y'all know I'm not color BLIND, I could be and y'all just being rude.
    Where I live you just can't find a go horse for sale, so I want to breed my mare before she gets to old. Both her and the stallion have good bloodline.
    SO forget, I just wanted to know what the % was. I have a Aunt that went all over the USA to ride, she is great with horses. So I can get ask her.
    So don't post again, if you don't think I can't care for a foal.
         
        11-09-2010, 12:25 PM
      #26
    Green Broke
    Well I can't speak for others, but I was not questioning your ability to care for a foal, just questioning whether you should be breeding.
         
        11-09-2010, 12:30 PM
      #27
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hoofprints in the Sand    
    Well I can't speak for others, but I was not questioning your ability to care for a foal, just questioning whether you should be breeding.
    Thank you.
    Sorry everyone, I just hate when someone says I can't raise something when I truly can. Sorry.

    I really won't be breeding, someone would bring the stallion over to my place or the mare over there. Well she is pregnant my Aunt would help me through it. Like I said, ''she great with horses, she bred them rode and care for them.'' So before someone saying I can't I need a reason why not.
    I wanted to breed not just the color but some rare color are worth a like in a horse. I wanted to breed for many reasons.
         
        11-09-2010, 12:32 PM
      #28
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cowgirl101    
    Knowing color of a horse DOESN'T mean I CAN'T for one!
    Oh my gosh, does anyone here know what color based is? It's a artist word.
    Color based=is the mean color!

    I think most of the people here know what a color bass is. With the exception of what you have posted. IN HORSES not in the art world there is only 2 base colors. Again red and black. There are no other colors in horses that are base colors. ALL other colors Bay Dun pally ect are all either red or black based.


    My mare is sorrel, how do y'all know I'm not color BLIND, I could be and y'all just being rude.

    Never said you where color blinded. Everyone is just trying to understand what you are saying.


    Where I live you just can't find a go horse for sale, so I want to breed my mare before she gets to old. Both her and the stallion have good bloodline.
    SO forget, I just wanted to know what the % was. I have a Aunt that went all over the USA to ride, she is great with horses. So I can get ask her.
    So don't post again, if you don't think I can't care for a foal.
    That is all find and good. However if you are breeding for color it is the wrong reason to be breeding. Also if you want to know the chances of getting a certain color we NEED to know exactly what color the horses in question are and you have not provided that. So until you do people are going to keep questioning you.
         
        11-09-2010, 12:53 PM
      #29
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nrhareiner    
    There is no such thing as a white based horse. They are either Red based or Black based. Everything past that are modifiers. Even a ALL white horse are not actually white. They are just expressing a paint pattern in is max form
    Here's an example...I own a buckskin mare who is registered as a Paint. Buckskin itself is the result of a Bay horse that posesses certain genes that create the buckskin look. See below...

    Buckskin occurs as a result of the creamdilution gene acting on a bay horse. Therefore, a buckskin has the Extension, or "black base coat" (E) gene, the agouti (A) gene, which restricts the black base coat to the points, and one copy of the cream gene, which lightens the red/brown color of the coat to a tan/gold.

    Buckskins should not be confused with dun-colored horses, which have another type of dilution gene, not the cream gene. Duns always have primitive markings (shoulder blade stripes, dorsal stripe, zebra stripes on legs, webbing). Unlike buckskins, who have the creme gene, dun horses have the dun gene. However, it is possible for a horse to carry both dilution genes; these are called "buckskin duns" or sometimes "dunskins." Also, bay horses without any dun gene may have a faint dorsal stripe, which sometimes is darkened in a buckskin without a dun gene being present. Additional primitive striping beyond just a dorsal stripe is a sure sign of the dun gene.

    A buckskin horse can occur in any number of different breeds, though at least one parent must be from a breed that carries the dilution gene, and not all breeds do.

    These are the kinds of things a breeder should know. I only have a small amount of information (mainly from the internet) about my horse and not a lot about others, except what I've learned on here. But then, that is why I'm not a breeder and don't plan to breed my mare :) But can I take care of her and train her well? You bet! It really has nothing to do with breeding. Not everyone has the knowledge and the $$ to breed...I certainly do not. But I do have the knowledge, the help of trainers and friends, and the $$ to own a horse :)
         
        11-09-2010, 12:56 PM
      #30
    Green Broke
    And here is some interesting information about your mare's color, from what we can all tell from the 1 photo on your profile anyway...

    Sorrel (horse)

    From Wikipedia


    A Chestnut or "Sorrel" horse


    Sorrel is an alternative word for one of the most common equine coat colors in horses. While the term is usually used to refer to a copper-red shade of chestnut, in some places it is used generically in place of "chestnut" to refer to any reddish horse with a same-color or lighter mane and tail, ranging from reddish-gold to a deep burgundy or chocolate shade. The term probably comes from the color of the flower spike of the sorrel herb.
    The term "chestnut" is the more common term used to describe horses of a reddish-brown color. Chestnut is more often used to describe this color in England and on the east coast of the USA, while the term "sorrel" is more common in the Western United States. Some horse enthusiasts insist that chestnut and sorrel are two distinct colorations, but there is no known genetic difference between the two and no clear consensus on what the distinction is. Some argue that "sorrel" should be used to describe only lighter shades, or shades with a very clear reddish tint, while "chestnut" denotes darker shades or shades with more brown in them. The American Quarter Horse Association, which uses both terms, describes a sorrel as a type of copper-red chestnut, but allows that chestnut is also a correct term.
    In terms of equine coat color genetics there is no difference at all. Solid reddish-brown color is a base color of horses, caused by the recessive "e" gene.
    Sorrel or chestnut coloration can be distinguished from dun by the fact that a dun horse has a gene that causes slightly washed-out yellowish color, with a darker mane and tail than the rest of its coat, may have areas of darker color on the shoulder and forelegs, and also possesses a narrow, dark line down the middle of the back.
    A sorrel and a bay, especially a "blood bay," may be confused with one another. However, all bays have "black points" - a black mane, tail and lower legs. Light-colored sorrels, sometimes called "blond sorrels," especially if they have flaxen manes and tails, may resemble a palomino. However, true palomino coloration is the result of a horse's being heterozygous for the cream dilution gene.

    A Quarter Horse registered as "sorrel"
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    What are her chances of slipping again? Redial Horse Breeding 4 10-11-2010 08:30 AM
    Chances Diet Good or bad? HorsesAreForever Horse Health 16 12-26-2008 10:29 PM
    Chances Conformation! HorsesAreForever Horse Riding Critique 14 09-01-2008 10:59 AM
    Chances Weight Update! HorsesAreForever Horse Health 5 06-12-2008 04:23 PM
    colour chances??? jazzyrider Horse Breeding 7 12-25-2007 05:21 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:07 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0