What Do You Consider A 'Breed-able' Horse?
 
 

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What Do You Consider A 'Breed-able' Horse?

This is a discussion on What Do You Consider A 'Breed-able' Horse? within the Horse Breeding forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
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    02-08-2012, 06:16 PM
  #1
Green Broke
What Do You Consider A 'Breed-able' Horse?

Firstly - I do not intend for this to become a debate, I have purely posted this so I and other Forum members can become more educated. I don't plan to breed - my horse is a gelding, even my un-educated (from a breeding point of view) know's that won't work.

What do you consider a horse which you would classify as breed worthy? What do you instantly say no to?

Personally, I consider a horse which is breed-able to have a good health record and a solid conformation. I wouldn't breed a horse that shows negative personality traits - Aggression or extreme misbehaviour (rearing, ground manner issues, etc). Also, maybe it's just my own thoughts but - I wouldn't breed a horse which hasn't 'succeeded' at anything. Example - if it was a horse which had only done well at one pony club event, compared to a horse which had competed successfully at many high level shows. I would easily look into the second one as a breeding prospect over the second one.

So, share your thoughts? What are your key positives and negatives?
     
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    02-08-2012, 06:27 PM
  #2
Yearling
That is a good question that I think all of here should stop a minute, actually take time to think about.

I go to school part time at a secondary school to major in Horse Production. We started on judging about two weeks ago, so I feel as if I am more educated on the stand point of conformation. Conformation will no matter what play a part in a horses life. A solid conformation would be a must in a "breed-able" horse. Just because a horse can't do anything preformance wise, because of the defects does not meen it is worth to breed. Lineage, would also play a role. If I wanted a little reiner, I wouldn't pick a stallion or mare that has mostly racing lines. So basing the disipline of said horse, would also be characterized. Also, if you plan on selling the product you created by breeding these horses, you would want it to be something someone will want to buy. Going back to my school, they breed and sell horses, along with train outside horses and sell-prep as well. Some of the babies that were born last year are getting ready to sell. The lady who puts them up for sale was being told that we(the students) have been taking them through a in-hand trail class. Making them go over trot-overs, over a bridge, side passes, pivots. The lady suggested video taping this, because that is what some people will want.

I got little off subject. Though I would for solid conformation, what that horse's ability is, and its lineage. I wouldn't go by performance record, not much of a bit deal to me. Though I guess that is m opinion.
     
    02-08-2012, 06:31 PM
  #3
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChingazMyBoy    
Firstly - I do not intend for this to become a debate, I have purely posted this so I and other Forum members can become more educated. I don't plan to breed - my horse is a gelding, even my un-educated (from a breeding point of view) know's that won't work.

What do you consider a horse which you would classify as breed worthy? What do you instantly say no to?

Personally, I consider a horse which is breed-able to have a good health record and a solid conformation. I wouldn't breed a horse that shows negative personality traits - Aggression or extreme misbehaviour (rearing, ground manner issues, etc). Also, maybe it's just my own thoughts but - I wouldn't breed a horse which hasn't 'succeeded' at anything. Example - if it was a horse which had only done well at one pony club event, compared to a horse which had competed successfully at many high level shows. I would easily look into the second one as a breeding prospect over the second one.

So, share your thoughts? What are your key positives and negatives?
Naturally I look at their pedigree. What did the sire and dam do? What has the horse in quesion accomplished. Has the sibilings(brothers and sisters) accomplished anything? Conformation is a must. This isn't a perfect horse, but it's best to get as close as possible with good legs, a nice lengthy neck, a short back, a great topline over all, and good muscling. There are other things to concider that the others will fill in, but that's just a basic idea . I also look at temperment. I want a foal to have the best temperment as possible so yeah, nothing aggressive and such as you mentioned. :)
     
    02-08-2012, 06:52 PM
  #4
Green Broke
I very much agree with the pedigree point you made, I forgot to mention that in my original post.

Horses are like humans - like all animals. If you look at your grandparents, parents or siblings. You will see many of the same physical and emotional traits.
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    02-08-2012, 07:34 PM
  #5
Yearling
Conformation should be basically correct, if not very correct. Correct being function for the job they are bred to do... While most of the basic conformation points are the same for all breeds, there are breed variances that come into play.

Temperment... Is a huge must for me, mare AND sire. I once owned a little stallion who had a bit of a nasty streak which only seemed to surface with people who were not firm with him... I originally thought it to be human caused, and thought little of it beyond correcting him if he stepped out of line. This was a fabulous little guy, large pony sized, very correct conformation, nice lines.... And an apparently hereditary mean streak. He passed the trait to four out of five offspring, I own the fifth (large pony gelding with a fantastic personality)... Later, after I had already gelded and sold him, I found out his sire was known for his bad attitude and hard to manage temperment, which sometimes seemed to show up in his offspring. So some temperment can be passed from the sire, in some cases!

Ability... I don't really care if a horse has never been shown, personally I think there is more to life than showing, but the horse does need to have a job it is GOOD at, or better yet, excels at.

Pedigree... I would never breed on pedigree alone, but it is never a bad idea to look over previous generations for genetic traits which may be desireable, or not.

For breeds where it is an issue... DNA testing for hereditary diseases is a huge must. Now that we know these things are definitely genetic, there is no excuse not to test and refrain from breeding horses who are known carriers of such. (HYPP, HERDA, PSSM (I think is the abbreviation) ...to name a few)

There is probably stuff I am not thinking of right now... But those hit the top of my list.
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    02-08-2012, 09:54 PM
  #6
Foal
Registered, have some sort of proven performance record or talent. No genetic issues and be conformationaly correct. Good minded and good tempered. A foal that you are planning on keeping or campaining before selling. JMHO
     
    02-08-2012, 10:51 PM
  #7
Yearling
I base what I would like to breed on conformation and pedigree. I won't breed an unregistered big horse and I want a horse to be able to do his job well and not have any flaws that can keep it from being successful in what it was meant to do. I won't breed a horse with a bad temperament and am really coming to like horses who show a very willing attitude, they seem to be not as dense and are much more easy to train!
     
    02-09-2012, 12:17 AM
  #8
Trained
Subbing so I don't forget to comment about this.
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    02-09-2012, 01:37 PM
  #9
Trained
1) Pedigree. What does the pedigree say about the horse? Was s/he a result of backyard breeding or was s/he carefully thought out before the sire and dam were ever brought together.

2) What have the sire and dam done? Do they have a show record? What about the grandsires and granddams? I don't have a problem with breeding to a horse that hasn't been shown before, but I want to know what they were good at. Or were they just pasture puffs?

3) Conformation. The horse has to be as correct as possible for the breed that they are, and the discipline that they are specializing in. Quarter Horse race horses have different conformation then cutting quarter horses, as opposed to western pleasure quarter horses and so on...

4) Temperament. The horse cannot have a bad attitude. They can't be nasty, have to be easy to handle and willing.

5) Registered. I have no problem owning a grade horse, but honestly, if something were to happen and you had to get rid of your horses, usually the registered ones go first. It makes them more valuable, unless the grade horse is a top notch show horse, but even then, they can't be shown in breed shows. I personally wouldn't breed a grade. There are too many horses out there that needs homes.

6) DNA Testing. The horses must be tested for any and every possible genetic defect that can come up with that particular breed. LWOS, HYPP, HERDA, etc.
     

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