*ATTENTION all ottb owners* - Page 2
 
 

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*ATTENTION all ottb owners*

This is a discussion on *ATTENTION all ottb owners* within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Buying a 10 year old OTTB with suspensory ligament injury
  • OTTB

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    01-29-2012, 01:35 PM
  #11
Trained
We had an appendix off the track who was a nutcase. I mean, beyond repair, a screw horse. It was my Moms horse and she had her in training for six months bfore the trainer finally said no more, she was probably going to be ruined forever. Well she's a broodmare now.

But on that note, I know a barn that has an OTTB as a schoolmaster. Sweetest, kindest horse on the face of the planet. She's fifteen years old now and they adopted her when she was four, started her in eventing and she just excelled in every possible way.

You look around at a lot of the barrel races too and you will see a lot of OTTBs here. They do very well! Some will always be crazier than others, but its not uncommon to see children racing them after their parents have trained them.
     
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    01-29-2012, 02:08 PM
  #12
Teen Forum Moderator
The main thing that I worry about with OTTBs is soundness. So many of them are thin boned, and they're all started far before their bodies have finished growing. I would recommend that, once you decide on your OTTB, you should get a full (or ATLEAST the basic) PPE done on him/her. This isn't fool proof but it can give you a basic idea.

Otherwise, once you've gotten your OTTB over that training 'hump' they're generally very willing animals with huge hearts. The problem is just getting them over that hump. Since an OTTB is already trained to ride, most people just start them from the saddle and forget that these horses never did get the proper ground work that is necessary to have a safe mount, and they push the horse too far too fast. And as soon as they hit one of the gaps where their OTTB didn't learn something, trouble comes. I've mostly had problems with getting my ex-racers to engage their hindquarters, because they've been running for so long WITHOUT the need to do this.

What everyone says about them being crazy and unsafe is totally true though. As you can see, my OTTB 'Old Man Noah', a 17.3hh TB that's only been off of the track for about a year, is about to viciously attack this poor, innocent little baby here.


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    01-29-2012, 02:52 PM
  #13
Yearling
I own a horse that was meant to be raced, but he was too slow and lazy and had no inspirational to run fast. His name is Mustard. Good slow quite horse, only 6 years old. So far he's spooked twice with me but over general things that I don't blame him for as he's slightly green. Theres a ottb in the paddock next to him, His name is Mucho(pronounced mooch-o) and he has only been off track 6 or so months and his rider knows her stuff but he is amazing, he jumps like a pro and he's so friendly when I pat him and say hello. He gets a little hot but he's in capable hands. A little more work and he's going to go a long way.
When I bought my tb, I was in the same boat as you. Tbs are 'known to be strong, hot and spooky', can I actually do it? I'm so glad I said yes, Mustard has become my best friend and my partner. So thoroughbreds in general are a great breed worth taking a look at. Just be careful as a few can get hot and take your time buying one, don't rush into anything :) goodluck!
     
    01-29-2012, 05:19 PM
  #14
Trained
No kidding re soundness. My boy Hugo I purchased straight off the track a few years ago. He was dead quiet, tried his heart out and was ready for his first preliminary start within 3 months.
Then the soundness troubles hit. He started on the track as a 2 year old, had 32 starts, and retired at 7.
First we had the arthritis and fusion of his hocks. Then we found that he had probably had tears or weaknesses to the soft tissue in his lower legs. He tore his suspensory ligament just moving around the paddock, and shortly after ruptured the corresponding tendon in the same leg. He was put down a week ago as a result.
And yes, he had a PPE before I bought him.
     
    01-29-2012, 08:41 PM
  #15
Weanling
You need to really take your time in finding the right one. A lot of people are more than happy to let you get on and try them out, especially if they are finished racing. I have had my OTTB just over a week now (my first OTTB for the record) and I had looked at a few but with him I just knew he was what I wanted. He doesnt have a bad, "spaz" bone in him. I battle to get him to trot sometimes and he went for his first outride on saturday and led the group the whole way along the roads. Nothing scared him. We were faced with cars, ATVs, People, dogs barking at people's fences, bicycles and even other horses and he never put a foot wrong.

Will he have days of giving me grief? Possibly! And OTTBs have a tendancy to run up the vet bills too! Mine was kicked badly yesterday due to his lack of understanding about his fellow paddock mates body language and is on box rest for injuries to 3 legs. The vet is coming to check on him in case because of the swelling.

They need serious ground work. Although mine is out of action at the moment I spend a good half hour a day tecahing him to back away from pressure, 'woah' etc. He has no idea what leg aids are either under saddle. Everything in their lives is a new experience.

Would I change him for anything in the world? NO!
     
    01-30-2012, 10:12 AM
  #16
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endiku    
The main thing that I worry about with OTTBs is soundness. So many of them are thin boned, and they're all started far before their bodies have finished growing. I would recommend that, once you decide on your OTTB, you should get a full (or ATLEAST the basic) PPE done on him/her. This isn't fool proof but it can give you a basic idea.

Otherwise, once you've gotten your OTTB over that training 'hump' they're generally very willing animals with huge hearts. The problem is just getting them over that hump. Since an OTTB is already trained to ride, most people just start them from the saddle and forget that these horses never did get the proper ground work that is necessary to have a safe mount, and they push the horse too far too fast. And as soon as they hit one of the gaps where their OTTB didn't learn something, trouble comes. I've mostly had problems with getting my ex-racers to engage their hindquarters, because they've been running for so long WITHOUT the need to do this.

What everyone says about them being crazy and unsafe is totally true though. As you can see, my OTTB 'Old Man Noah', a 17.3hh TB that's only been off of the track for about a year, is about to viciously attack this poor, innocent little baby here.


Oh yes! So vicious!! That lil one is just too cute!! Also...probably a stupid question,,,but is it a good idea to continue to use the chain lead rope after you bring them home, or can you transition to a regular leadrope? I see so many of them with a chain over thier nose and wonder if that is something I need to consider or can retire after he has settled in his new home? Thanks!
     
    01-30-2012, 01:52 PM
  #17
Teen Forum Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by annaleah    
Oh yes! So vicious!! That lil one is just too cute!! Also...probably a stupid question,,,but is it a good idea to continue to use the chain lead rope after you bring them home, or can you transition to a regular leadrope? I see so many of them with a chain over thier nose and wonder if that is something I need to consider or can retire after he has settled in his new home? Thanks!
It's not a stupid question at all! Generally speaking, all racehorses will have a stud chain looped over their nose or under their lip as more of a habit than there actually being a need for one. Some OTTBs are very hot and need the extra control, but most are very well versed in walking on a lead and as long as you are confident, quickly teach them to mind their own space, and stay alert at all times, I would immediately transition them to a nylon or cotton lead. A lot of OTTBs that I've met have been very clueless when it comes your personal space, which is what causes the most injuries to the handler though, so I would recommend walking with a lunge whip in hand for the first month or two, just in case it is needed to reprimind.
     
    01-30-2012, 02:05 PM
  #18
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endiku    
It's not a stupid question at all! Generally speaking, all racehorses will have a stud chain looped over their nose or under their lip as more of a habit than there actually being a need for one. Some OTTBs are very hot and need the extra control, but most are very well versed in walking on a lead and as long as you are confident, quickly teach them to mind their own space, and stay alert at all times, I would immediately transition them to a nylon or cotton lead. A lot of OTTBs that I've met have been very clueless when it comes your personal space, which is what causes the most injuries to the handler though, so I would recommend walking with a lunge whip in hand for the first month or two, just in case it is needed to reprimind.
Thank you so much for the advice! Do you think a carrot stick or a long dressage whip would be just as effective? I am very big on horses not getting in my space...that can be dangerous...I want them to stay in thier space and only their space. Especially seeing as how tb's tend to be tall and I am only 5'1...I really don't want to get run over!
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    01-30-2012, 02:25 PM
  #19
Green Broke
It seems like the ones that did good on the track tend to be more, for lack of a better word, crazy.

I got my OTTB when she was 12, so I never got any crazies...
     
    01-30-2012, 02:32 PM
  #20
Teen Forum Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by annaleah    
Thank you so much for the advice! Do you think a carrot stick or a long dressage whip would be just as effective? I am very big on horses not getting in my space...that can be dangerous...I want them to stay in thier space and only their space. Especially seeing as how tb's tend to be tall and I am only 5'1...I really don't want to get run over!

Haha, I can relate! Noah, as I said- is a whopping 17.3hh, while I'm 4'11 when stretching!

I have to tell you, I'm not familiar with carrot sticks at all. From pictures they appear to just be lunging whips that won't bend. I suppose that would work, provided that you have a string attached to it. I always like to give a warning snap in the air before I actually make contact with the horse, and I'd hate to just be whacking at him with a big inflexible rod XD

A dressage whip would be fine as well.
     

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