Anyone have a retired race horse?
   

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Anyone have a retired race horse?

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  • Retired racehorse for a beginner?

 
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    01-10-2011, 01:58 PM
  #1
Foal
Anyone have a retired race horse?

I'm looking at buying my first horse (I'm a beginner), my dd has a quarter horse. I would like to ride with her. All I want to do is walk on trails. I found an almost 20yo thoroughbred that sounds great. SHe is in great shape, well behaved, very well trained, will neck rein, responds to voice commands. The owners say she will still GO! If you want her to, but she is perfectly happy to just walk. Her mouth is tattooed.

So assuming she has a great personality and we get along good, what can I expect out of this breed? I was wanting an older gaited horse, but her price is excellent and I though she was worth looking at. I haven't gone to look at her yet.
     
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    01-11-2011, 01:07 AM
  #2
Foal
Regardless of the breed of the horse as long as her personality is what you're looking for that's what matters. You also should take someone with some experience with you when you go look at this horse and have either them or the current owner ride her so you can see how she reacts... just in case.

I'm sure you'll get many more replies with more helpful advice but this is my basic advice for now :)
     
    01-11-2011, 01:15 AM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Porch Swinger    
I'm looking at buying my first horse (I'm a beginner), my dd has a quarter horse. I would like to ride with her. All I want to do is walk on trails. I found an almost 20yo thoroughbred that sounds great. SHe is in great shape, well behaved, very well trained, will neck rein, responds to voice commands. The owners say she will still GO! If you want her to, but she is perfectly happy to just walk. Her mouth is tattooed.

So assuming she has a great personality and we get along good, what can I expect out of this breed? I was wanting an older gaited horse, but her price is excellent and I though she was worth looking at. I haven't gone to look at her yet.
TO date I've rescued TWO retired race horses. One was a thoroughbred named "Gambler" ... and the other is our horse we have now "George" (a Standardbred.)
Gambler stole my heart! He was such a sweetie! And when we rode him (my husband or myself) if we wanted him to GOOO ... he would. He had the "get up and go" still in him! But he was very respectful and obedient and only did it when asked.
Our current horse "George" is another one of those heart thieves!! We've only had him for a month now, and we're still getting to know him, and vice versa. I don't know if he still has the "get up and go" in him ... because so far he's not interested in running at all. My hubby TRIED to get him to run ... and it was like pulling teeth just to get him in a trot. Which is fine by me - because all I'm interested in is a nice and easy walk on the trails.

I would recommend either breed in a heart beat. Sounds like the one you're looking at would make a great horse. Hopefully it all works out for you one way or another.
     
    01-13-2011, 05:54 PM
  #4
Showing
First off, every individual is different. BUT the breed characteristics of each filter into individual personalities.

I've had three off-track Thoroughbreds, and 2/3 have been very goey, 3/3 have been spooky, but they always calm down with time and training.

While you shouldn't go looking for a hot-blooded horse as a beginner, you shouldn't not consider a TB because he's a TB. Go try him out, don't be afraid to make mistakes, and see if he's bothered by those mistakes. If he seems tense or high-strung, he may not be the right horse.
     
    01-14-2011, 07:42 PM
  #5
Weanling
I agree with equiniphile, every horse is different. I worked at a sale barn and worked with a lot of OTTB's, some were hot tbs, others I couldn't get to move without spurs and were just generally very quiet. I currently own an OTTB and he is 9 out of 10 times very quiet. I have also found that the tb's get very attatched to their owners or riders and will usually do anything for them. Go try the horse see if you get along.
     
    01-16-2011, 01:41 PM
  #6
Yearling
If I may I'd like to share another Board I am a member on. It is exracers.com. There are some extremely experienced people there. Some still have TBs on the tracks and others take in OTTBs and retrain them for second careers.
     
    01-17-2011, 04:54 AM
  #7
Foal
My sister owns an older retired racehorse (he is 16). I agree that it totally depends on the horse more then the breed. Maybe you could take this horse for a trial to make sure she stays calm while you are riding her on the trail? From what I have noticed with the Thoroughbreds I have worked around are that they are not easy keepers. They need more food to keep weight on, especially in the winter, and they seem to be more prone to injury. Of course, this isn't all Thoroughbreds, I have known some that wern't, but my sisters TB definitely is more prone to injury then my Quater Horse. Now that said, that means nothing about this horse you are looking at. She could be the perfect horse for you. It is hard to say but that is my experience. I love TBs and think they're awesome.
     
    01-17-2011, 09:46 AM
  #8
Weanling
My Shasta is a an OTTB. I just love her (obviously)! She has never been an easy horse to ride, but you could always train and work with a problem until it's resolved unlike some other breeds that don't take direction very well once they have hit a certain age. I've ridden many OTTBs and one common theme is that I've never had to work to make them go, I work got make them stop. This coud be a great horse! Like the other posters said, try her out. I agree with furlongs that they can be more prone to injury dependng on what happened to them on the track so ask the owners if they know this horse's racing history and if she was ever injured on the track. I would also look for pinfire. If she has it then she can still be totally fine but can be an indication to ask mire questions and find ot why she was pin fired. The horse in my avatar was pinfired for what we now know to be arthritic changes. No big deal but need to know. If you aren't sure what pinfiring is let me know and I can explain what it looks like or else your vet should know what it is. Good luck =)
     
    01-17-2011, 10:27 AM
  #9
Weanling
Very good advice up there. I also had an OTTB. On the ground he was a gentleman. Up on his back was a crapshoot. He never was consistant, would walk right past something one day, the next day he was pretty sure it was going to eat him. Always a handful to ride. As long as he was ridden daily he was somewhat easier to deal with... miss a few days and was back to square one.
He was constantly injureing himself... a train wreck on 4 legs. Very hard keeper and took a lot to keep him at a good weight.
Go see this mare being ridden, make sure someone hadn't ridden her out before you get there... you want to see a fresh ride. Good luck!
     

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