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Breed for beginner

This is a discussion on Breed for beginner within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

     
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        02-08-2010, 11:04 PM
      #41
    Weanling
    >>>> Not any more. If there isn't a number of registered QH's in the first three generations, you're talking apples and oranges.

    Actually, if the predominant ancestry farther back in the Paint's pedigree is AQHA, just breeding "Paint to Paint" for a few generations would not be enough by itself to make the resulting horse completely different than its predecessors. There would have to be conscious breeder selection away from the ancestor's type and conscious selection toward another type-- and I do not see that happeneing, overall, in the Paint breed.

    >>>> Because of the need to specialize to excel in the various disciplines, the QH and Paint look nothing alike conformationally. In fact, within the QH breed itself, you will see a large variance in conformation.

    As has been said by myself and others in previous posts, there are variations within these breeds, yes, but Paints and QHs which are bred to excell in the same disciplines most often DO resemble one another in type, and are usually of similar bloodlines as well.

    >>>> The Paint and QH are no longer the same horse.

    Again I have not said that the paint and QH are ALL, breed-wide, "the same horse"-- individual lines do exist in each breed-- but the Paint breed as a whole DOES continue to be highly influenced by AQHA breeding.

    >>>> It's like saying the Lusitano and the Andalusian are the same horse. Umm....no, they aren't.

    What you are completely missing in your comparison is that the Andalusian and the Lusitano have been seperate CLOSED BOOK breeds for many generations---for many generations the two have not and are now still not allowed to interbreed.

    The American Paint Horse Association still allows AQHA breeding. It has not been discontinued or even really slowed down. There also have been and continue to be horses with full registration in both AQHA and APHA. BOTH registries still allow TB breeding.

    Did you look at the photos and pedigrees of current, winning Paint horses of several types that I posted in my last reply?

    Do you realize that the APHA still allows breeding to AQHA and TB?

    Do you know that there are many breeders that keep both AQHA and APHA papers on any horses that are eligible for registration in both registries? So there are a notable number of Paint horses that not only have AQHA bloodlines-- they *ARE* AQHA registered themselves.

    What experiences have you had with Paints and the APHA that have made you so adamant that Paints have been bred to a completely different type from QHs, and that as a breed they are a "tougher nut to crack" disposition-wise? Do you show at APHA breed shows? Do you subscribe to the Paint Horse Journal? Are you currently breeding and raising Paints that are competitive in events held by associations such as NSBA, NRHA, NCHA, and etc? If so, what part of the country/world are you in? What are the names and pedigrees of some of the Paints that you are breeding/showing/working with?
         
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        02-09-2010, 01:09 PM
      #42
    Foal
    Thank you all! You have given my a lot to think on and consider. I think that our next purchase will be much more suitable.

         
        02-09-2010, 09:34 PM
      #43
    Foal
    I didn't read any of the posts but I'm sure someone has mentioned the Quarter horse. They come in all sizes and are really layed back. A great first horse! Breeds not to buy? I'd say arabians or thoroughbreds definitely at the top of the list! There are some arabs and tbs out there that are great but because their cold blooded they have alot of energy and usually arn't the best beginner or first horse. Good Luck!!!
         
        02-10-2010, 06:20 AM
      #44
    Foal
    Connemaras are very nice,easy to look after , are willing to do what their told =]
         
        02-10-2010, 07:00 AM
      #45
    Weanling
    First and formost since this seems to have gotten off track with the Q/H Paint comparison, the OP needs to complete their training and learn the confidence and skill to be the herd leader or they will continue to buy and sell every horse they get. I don't care what breed or what age they are the same problems will arise with each horse no matter how old or trained they are. We have worked with so many great horses that for the lack of a proper leader in their owner develop bad habits. How many big trainers have said there are a lot of great horses with a lot of bad owners.

    I also cannot understand why you would get rid of this horse. If you cannot afford a trainer for this horse how can you afford another horse even if you sell?

    I also can tell you I have sold a few of those problem horses we have brought around and countless times have turned down people who want to buy a young horse for their beginner. I personally won't sell a youngster to a beginning rider. The best choice is an older 15+ been there, done that horse that can be leased. Good luck in your search. Once you and your children have the confidence and skill developed there will be plenty of chance to look around for the perfect breed.
         
        02-10-2010, 12:33 PM
      #46
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Macslady    
    First and formost since this seems to have gotten off track with the Q/H Paint comparison, the OP needs to complete their training and learn the confidence and skill to be the herd leader or they will continue to buy and sell every horse they get. I don't care what breed or what age they are the same problems will arise with each horse no matter how old or trained they are. We have worked with so many great horses that for the lack of a proper leader in their owner develop bad habits. How many big trainers have said there are a lot of great horses with a lot of bad owners.

    I also cannot understand why you would get rid of this horse. If you cannot afford a trainer for this horse how can you afford another horse even if you sell?

    I also can tell you I have sold a few of those problem horses we have brought around and countless times have turned down people who want to buy a young horse for their beginner. I personally won't sell a youngster to a beginning rider. The best choice is an older 15+ been there, done that horse that can be leased. Good luck in your search. Once you and your children have the confidence and skill developed there will be plenty of chance to look around for the perfect breed.

    I am answering the bolded question.

    We are selling Molly because we can't give her the instruction that she deserves. The money will be used for more lessons for us. We are not going to purchase another horse until we are more confident and knowledgable. Myself, my husband, and my trainer believe that we don't need to make another horse purchase until we can get on the horse and decide for ourselves if we're comfortable with it.

    As many of the posters and readers who have helped answer some of my quetions know, we bought this mare with the belief that she was beginner safe and kid broke and paid beginner money for her. Yes, I know we made the first beginner buyer mistake with buying on first visit, we've been over that. Lesson WELL learned. That is why I can't afford to send her to a trainer at this point.

    As much as myself and kids want a horse of our own, I agree that it isn't our time yet. I have learned a valuable lesson, and that is to not put the cart before the horse, literally. I also hope that this expreince will follow my kids in other directions as well. Knowledge and work, then reward.

    Please understand that I acknowledge that I (we) are not in anyway, form, or fashion experienced with horses, but we have a great love and desire to be included in their world. My goal is to learn as much as I can and aid my children (3 & eight) in their learning experience. The best way for me to do that is to ask questions and take in the opinions of those experienced in that area. I have learned a lot from you guys and our instructor and am still doing so. With so many views and opinions I am able to make better decisions for us. I understand that many adults my not be as open minded to others sharing their knowledge, but I do not have a know it all mentality. I welcome others instruction and opinions. Like I said, for me personally it helps aid me in the best direction for my family. This forum's members are who helped me decide to find a riding instructor and that is one of the best decisions I've made in our quest to get involved in the horse world. Horse lovers are some of the most passionate, dedicated people I have met. That is why I think this thread got a bit off track, but that's okay, becasue I have still learned a lot from each post. Thank you for sharing guys.
         
        02-10-2010, 04:04 PM
      #47
    Foal
    Hello,
    I also agree that breed isn't as important as temperment. We have a haflinger, a paint and a tb. We enjoy all of them and they each are unique in their own way. I do believe having the right size horse is important. I am 4'10 and saddling our 16'2 tb can be a challenge not because he doesn't stand still just because of his sheer size. Ask yourself what you are looking for in a horse be it good ground manners, gentle, not bothered by young children and their wonderful exuberance. I am sure there are certain things that are must and certain things that you will be able to overlook or overcome. Happy horse hunting!
         
        02-10-2010, 04:06 PM
      #48
    Foal
    Sorry I didn't read the post all the way through.
         
        02-10-2010, 04:27 PM
      #49
    Foal
    I have a welsh D now but spent a lot of time with a welsh A when I was younger might be worth thinking somthing along the welsh c lines but as said training and temprement should come high on priority list as the horse who gave me most of my experiance up to the age of 17 from the age of 2 was a piebald cob who stood 14.3hh! (the best horse in the world ever!)
         
        02-11-2010, 07:00 AM
      #50
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Horse Dreamer    
    I am answering the bolded question.

    We are selling Molly because we can't give her the instruction that she deserves. The money will be used for more lessons for us. We are not going to purchase another horse until we are more confident and knowledgable. Myself, my husband, and my trainer believe that we don't need to make another horse purchase until we can get on the horse and decide for ourselves if we're comfortable with it.

    As many of the posters and readers who have helped answer some of my quetions know, we bought this mare with the belief that she was beginner safe and kid broke and paid beginner money for her. Yes, I know we made the first beginner buyer mistake with buying on first visit, we've been over that. Lesson WELL learned. That is why I can't afford to send her to a trainer at this point.

    As much as myself and kids want a horse of our own, I agree that it isn't our time yet. I have learned a valuable lesson, and that is to not put the cart before the horse, literally. I also hope that this expreince will follow my kids in other directions as well. Knowledge and work, then reward.

    Please understand that I acknowledge that I (we) are not in anyway, form, or fashion experienced with horses, but we have a great love and desire to be included in their world. My goal is to learn as much as I can and aid my children (3 & eight) in their learning experience. The best way for me to do that is to ask questions and take in the opinions of those experienced in that area. I have learned a lot from you guys and our instructor and am still doing so. With so many views and opinions I am able to make better decisions for us. I understand that many adults my not be as open minded to others sharing their knowledge, but I do not have a know it all mentality. I welcome others instruction and opinions. Like I said, for me personally it helps aid me in the best direction for my family. This forum's members are who helped me decide to find a riding instructor and that is one of the best decisions I've made in our quest to get involved in the horse world. Horse lovers are some of the most passionate, dedicated people I have met. That is why I think this thread got a bit off track, but that's okay, becasue I have still learned a lot from each post. Thank you for sharing guys.
    Good luck in your search. I am sure you will have the horse you want eventually, you are definitely moving in the right direction. It saddens me that someone sold you an animal with dishonesty. I see way to much of that nowadays.
         

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