Which breed would be best for my riding interests? - Page 3
   

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Which breed would be best for my riding interests?

This is a discussion on Which breed would be best for my riding interests? within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        04-14-2013, 12:53 AM
      #21
    Started
    This thread has made me wonder about the OP's actual knowledge of horses, considering the questions she has asked. This especially, since she is considering giving lessons to youngsters.

    I would think for lessons to very young children, the smaller size range would be preferred. Also, the horse must be incredibly well trained. Age wouldn't really matter. Breed wouldn't matter. Training and being a solid and forgiving mount, would.

    I could be wrong, but by what the OP has said so far, I don't think I'd be placing my very young grandchildren with her, for lessons.

    Lets hope also, that she will be carrying the correct insurance for lessons.

    Lizzie
         
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        04-14-2013, 12:39 PM
      #22
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FeatheredFeet    
    This thread has made me wonder about the OP's actual knowledge of horses, considering the questions she has asked. This especially, since she is considering giving lessons to youngsters.

    I would think for lessons to very young children, the smaller size range would be preferred. Also, the horse must be incredibly well trained. Age wouldn't really matter. Breed wouldn't matter. Training and being a solid and forgiving mount, would.

    I could be wrong, but by what the OP has said so far, I don't think I'd be placing my very young grandchildren with her, for lessons.

    Lets hope also, that she will be carrying the correct insurance for lessons.

    Lizzie
    To me, breed does matter. I don't know why, just seeing the typical temperamant of a breed. I wouldn't put a little kid on a pure bred Arabian, but maybe an old QH.
    I agree with all of you! The training matters way more! I just have to find the right horse that would fit my needs and a youngsters needs!

    Also, I don't think I mentioned this, I'm partnering up with my trainer to teach lessons to younger kids. I'm just getting another horse to show and then maybe the little kids could show it too. My trainer has a beginner horse for them and then I'd have a horse for the kids who've mastered basic riding and would need a different horse to give them challenges.

    I do not know everything there is to know about horses. I'm getting there!
    My trainer would be handling cost/insurance and I wouldn't get any money out of it. I'd be volunteering there over the summer and I thought it would be a good way to see the insights of lessons to younger kids at a large riding facility.

    Thank you to everyone who has answered my questions!
    Best of luck to y'all!
         
        04-14-2013, 12:42 PM
      #23
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by LoveForHorses97    
    . I wouldn't put a little kid on a pure bred Arabian, but maybe an old QH.
    Well there you go, I would put anyone, even my brand new baby grandson on my Ace, and she is 100% Arab, but a great baby sitting mare, wouldn't put a youngster on her daughter Emmy though, breed is not a predictor of behaviour.
    smrobs and FeatheredFeet like this.
         
        04-14-2013, 02:06 PM
      #24
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
    Well there you go, I would put anyone, even my brand new baby grandson on my Ace, and she is 100% Arab, but a great baby sitting mare, wouldn't put a youngster on her daughter Emmy though, breed is not a predictor of behaviour.
    True. Well, I guess I'm relying way to much on my personal experience with the breed rather than the breed in it's entirety.
         
        04-14-2013, 02:27 PM
      #25
    Trained
    I know that feeling, I had an irrational and totally unfounded bias against Arabs for years, if I had known the truth, rather than reading all the hysteria I would have found my perfect horses a lot earlier.

    My previous experience was with an Arab who was more like the stereotype, and she made me think that Arabs were crazy, NO she was crazy, either by nature or had been made that way.

    I don't think you can beat a good Arab if you want something that has a little spark to them, but you have to appreciate them for what they are, and work with them
         
        04-14-2013, 03:16 PM
      #26
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
    I know that feeling, I had an irrational and totally unfounded bias against Arabs for years, if I had known the truth, rather than reading all the hysteria I would have found my perfect horses a lot earlier.

    My previous experience was with an Arab who was more like the stereotype, and she made me think that Arabs were crazy, NO she was crazy, either by nature or had been made that way.

    I don't think you can beat a good Arab if you want something that has a little spark to them, but you have to appreciate them for what they are, and work with them
    Yeah. Haha Well, thank you! I'll be on the lookout for something awesome, no matter what the breed :)

    Thanks everyone! :)
         
        04-15-2013, 03:29 PM
      #27
    Yearling
    Breed can be an indicator of a "general rule"... But I see it more in the sense that some breeds have purposely been bred "dumbed down" for a specific job (breeding that often require a very quiet, solid, take orders kind of horse) while others have been bred to be more "hyped up" ("hot") and others still have been bred in-between.

    For instance, it would be rather impractical for a plough horse to be very highstrung - chances are, few people breed high strung drafts for that purpose. As a result, many drafts (but not all... The general rule always has exceptions!) are quiet minded and appear quite "placid". Now this does change a bit depending on which draft breed too... But for argument's sake, it is generally perceived that draft breeds are "quiet".

    Likewise, it wouldn't really be ideal to have a "sleepy" Thoroughbred if considering their main job... Their job is, generally, to race, so generally those animals which are quick reacting and sensitive to everything are going to be what is bred... Which carries forward those traits more often than not. This gives the "impression" that TB's as a breed are "hot".

    So yes, breed does "matter", to a point.

    I would not be looking at a full draft for a serious dressage prospect, for example. If one came across my path which had the qualities and talent of a dressage horse I wouldn't turn it down without checking it out first though.

    I would not go hunting for a TB or Arab for a beginner horse... But again, if one with the temperment suited for a beginner came along, I wouldn't say no based on breed alone.

    So really, breed gives us a way to narrow a search for the right horse down - but it cannot be used as an absolute.

    When it comes to a lesson horse, I would rarely, if ever, look for a "competition horse" to fill the role of "beginner mount", at least not for jumpers or dressage. The reason being that usually horses who are true competitors also have a temperment which is just too much horse for a person just learning. They are often "unforgiving" of mistakes because they are usually trained to a finer point and of a temperment which is just a bit more sensitive than what tends to make an ideal lesson horse.

    I choose a lesson horse, always, primarily on temperment. Let's face it, a new rider does NOT need a Grand Prix mount... They need something patient, quiet, well trained and forgiving to their early mistakes. They don't need to be fancy, nor especially athletically talented, just sound - they are worth their weight in gold based on their mind alone.

    So my one bit of advice is... Decide whether you want a horse YOU can show and move up on, or if you want "a packer" to give lessons on who also has enough ability for you to show from time to time on, because it is very rare you will find one capable of being both. Trying to make a horse meant for competition fit into the role of "packer" will almost always end up in injury sooner or later. (with that said, I have seen plenty of RETIRED show horses go on to be good intermediate level lesson mounts, and a few also suit SOME beginners... But this is after their careers as show horses are over and they are starting to slow down a bit)
         
        04-15-2013, 05:36 PM
      #28
    Started
    We had three perfect beginners horses on the farm in the last year, one pure arab, one arab x quarter and one appy.

    I trust my arab with my life, and would far rather put a kid on her back than on most other horses I've owned.

    My experiences with qh's? Bad, bad and bad. I live in QH country and you would have to give me one for me to own one. The only good one I have ever been around was grade. She was a bit 'bland' in the personality department, but OK. Otherwise I have been bucked off, bitten, kicked at, struck at, reared on and generally abused by more quarter horses than any other breed. There is one on the farm right now(out of 20 head) and her owner has been bucked off many times in the ten years she has owned her, and even recently(mare is 18) was bucked off when her mare spontaneously turned into a bronc. This mare has been ridden for thousands and thousands of hours. I'm not judging the whole breed, but in my personal experience I would far rather trust an arab or thoroughbred.
         
        04-15-2013, 07:09 PM
      #29
    Green Broke
    In my experience, Quarter Horses are much easier to deal with than Arabs. I ride an Arab and I like them. I would not recommend my horse for a beginner.
         
        04-17-2013, 07:41 PM
      #30
    Yearling
    For what its worth, I think you have to look at what the horse was bred for both historically and in recent times. Where I live a lot of arabians are halter bred, they are smaller, more delicate looking and much hotter than what I personally desire in a riding mount. We have a lot of quarter horses that are spoiled and snotty. This is in part because we don't have many working for survival cow places where I live and the QH has a reputation as being a beginner horse. This means people can breed them without much consideration for things like ability and temperament. They are also owned by people who let them get away with murder.

    I like standardbreds. I think they illustrate the point I am trying to make well, so please indulge me. Where I live there are a few harness tracks. Standardbreds are born to trot or pace fast; however, they are of no use to anyone if they are not safe. At the end of the day, the guy sitting in the bike behind the horse is often the same guy who trains and the guy who owns the horse. Which means that if a horse is dangerous its not going to make it. So, look at the area and what the horses are bred for. I had a great arabian mare who was not refined, not delicate and totally not a halter horse. She was the best horse to learn to ride on and would jump anything you pointed her at. If you live in an area that has a bunch of horses that are being bred for one task and you are not interested in that task its harder to find a horse. If you want a QH to jump and you live in a place where the majority of QHs are cow horses you have a harder time finding one built to jump because conformation is going to follow functional. They cow horse is built different than a jumper. Its like the difference between a bench/show bred English Setter and a field/work bred English Setter. Almost two different breeds.
         

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