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Breeds

This is a discussion on Breeds within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Extremly dished faced Arabian horses
  • Stallion breeds with feathered feet

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  • 1 Post By *ArabianPrincess*

 
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    06-29-2007, 12:14 AM
  #1
Foal
Breeds

How can you tell what breed horses are, just by their markings, shapes and sizes?
     
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    06-29-2007, 06:43 AM
  #2
Weanling
Stripes.. White on black or black on white.. Aka... A Zebra. Its its natrual colour.

Feathers.. Stocky built tall horses.. Could be a cob, Clydie, Shire.. ect ect.

Thin Dishy headded things.. Arabian.. Arabian x


Its just Instinc.

People see something and will go BLAH BLAH BLAH w/e there opinion.. Is!
EthanQ likes this.
     
    06-29-2007, 09:51 AM
  #3
Foal
Different breeds have different features, whether it be markings, build, etc that are common among that particular breed. It just kind of takes alot of practice and knowledge about the different breeds to recognize them.

Just as some examples (using some extremely different horse breeds, so you can kind of see the difference):

Arabian:

http://www.arabianhorses.org/images/424279.jpg

Notice the small, petite build, the high-set tail, the small, dished faced, etc. All of those features are extremely common among Arabs.

Paint Horse:

http://rockinkfarm.com/images/imprin...rultimate2.jpg

Notice, obvisouly, the coloring and the stocky, "bull dog" build of the horse.

Shire:

http://www.rossinger.at/bilder/shire-horse.jpg

A typical draft type horse. The massive built and the heavily feathered feet.
     
    06-30-2007, 02:41 AM
  #4
Foal
It is possible to tell SOME breeds. There are to many now that yuo can't just say its that breed. Like was said draft horses normally, arabians and paints sometimes. Some breeds are part this and part that. Like pintobian is a spotted up arabian you see the characteristics of both the dishy heads of an arabian and the color.of the paint. But if you get down to it sometimes you cannot derive the difference between a quarterhorse and a stocky throughbred (know one that thought was qh) or the difference bewteen a throughbred/quarter horse cross and a stock paint/walking horse cross. The mustang you can't pinpoint the breed of horse it came from because it is a cross of many. SOMETIMES yuo can tell a horse's breed by some of his characteristics or even if its a cross you can tell what it is a mix with but it has gotten to be too many the answer to the question is YES and No. Truly depends on the horse that is in question.
     
    06-30-2007, 07:05 AM
  #5
Started
Sometimes you might see a horse trotting in the paddock with it's tail up like an Arab so it MIGHT be one. A small fluffy thing would most likely to be a Shetland. A BIG, TALL, thin horse may be a TB.
     
    02-23-2013, 05:17 PM
  #6
Foal
Suitable breed

Hi I am new to this site hope I'm posting in the right place! I am a first time buyer and have 2 daughters 9 and 12 and want a horse that is suitable for a mother daughter share any recommendations for bleeds to look for and are geldings generally more Laidback? Thanks joxx
     
    02-23-2013, 05:53 PM
  #7
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juttley73    
Hi I am new to this site hope I'm posting in the right place! I am a first time buyer and have 2 daughters 9 and 12 and want a horse that is suitable for a mother daughter share any recommendations for bleeds to look for and are geldings generally more Laidback? Thanks joxx
Welcome to the forum, you might do better making your own thread (so people will be more likely to notice you). But in my opinion, while breeds are all a little different - the individual animal is what you need to know. I would avoid 'hotter' breeds like thoroughbreds, arabians, warmbloods - but there will still be exceptions in those areas. I would recommend quarter horses or draft crosses, they tend to be mellow and easy going.
No matter what breed you get you want to be sure to visit, ride, and get a pre-purchase vet exam on the horse before riding! If the seller won't let you do any of those things before hand RUN the other way! I also seriously recommend having a trainer and having the trainer accompany you while looking at horses, their experience they may notice something you don't. More eyes are always better anyway.
Personally I'd avoid ponies, unless they're larger pony breeds - as much as a good pony is worth their weight in gold, having to sell a pony when the kids grow out of them is just about the most heart breaking experience. Get a horse the kids can ride now safely and will grow into.
     

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