Can i keep this horse on my land? - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeds

Can i keep this horse on my land?

This is a discussion on Can i keep this horse on my land? within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • How to keep a horse in woods
  • How do i know if i can keep a horse on my land

Like Tree4Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    12-18-2011, 08:24 PM
  #11
twh
Weanling
No offense, but I can't understand how you can afford the needs of a horse/mule/donkey/whatever if you can't afford boarding...
Posted via Mobile Device
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    12-18-2011, 08:52 PM
  #12
Showing
Keeping a horse at home is much cheaper than boarding. This land is awesome for your horse, it will keep her fit. Hills are greating for muscling up the hindquarters and building stamina. Don't worry about her tripping, the more challenging the course the more sure-footed she will become. It's a win/win. In summer you'll have to monitor the water situation. If the creek slows down to barely moving she may not drink it and you'll have to provide water.
     
    12-18-2011, 09:11 PM
  #13
Started
Given the heavy tree cover, I'd make sure to budget for hay and other feed since there may not be enough good quality grass for a horse to eat. But if you can get around just fine, a reasonably sound horse ought to be able to as well. It would be good to have a stall/shed/run-in built in case you need to confine the critter for any reason (farrier coming out that day, injury, etc) and if you can do that like you said, I don't see a problem.
     
    12-30-2011, 06:41 AM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by twh    
No offense, but I can't understand how you can afford the needs of a horse/mule/donkey/whatever if you can't afford boarding...
Posted via Mobile Device
Boarding in some areas can be very expensive. I had been paying $900 a month board for 3 horses. Now I have 5 horses at home and don't spend even nearly that much.
     
    12-30-2011, 07:38 AM
  #15
Banned
Be sure to thoroughly investigate what it will cost to put fence and a run in shed up. Also make sure you budget adequately for hay year round. Since there will be no natural forage/grass on your property, you will have to have hay in front of your horse at all times. I would allow a full square bale per day per horse.

Yes, keeping a horse at home is *can be* cheaper than boarding, but not necessarily depending on conditions. Pasture boarding self care at a place with with grass would be cheaper than keeping a horse on this set up; full care stall board will be more expensive because of labor and bedding costs. Feed and hay cost will be the same on your own place, possibly more as you'll be buying in small lots rather than bulk.

I don't have any concerns about the hilliness of the property.

Lack of grass would be my primary concern. Also, you don't mention how big the property is, or what the zoning regs are in your area. I would say it the property if 5 acres or less, you will also need a plan for manure handling or removal, which may be another expense.
     
    12-30-2011, 08:49 AM
  #16
Started
TWH,I have always had horses and was able to keep them at home.. If I had to pay board bills, I imagine I would not have horses.

Just because you can't afford to pay monthly board bills doesn't make you incapable of keeping or affording horses. I am constantly amazed at how much board is and how much a person pays for it.
     
    12-30-2011, 08:54 AM
  #17
Weanling
We moved ours from boarding 5 horses @ $150 and 2 @ $200 each. That's a total of $1150 a month. We now rent an old farm house with a couple outbuildings. The outbuildings aren't the greatest, but they do keep the wind and rain off them if they need to get in. House rent is minimal, but with 7 we feed hay year round. They are in paddocks and yes factor in manure removal. We either rent a skid loader and store it in a pile, then in the spring we will have the farmer come and clean it in the spring and he will take it and spread it on his fields. We buy minimal feed, some for our baby colt who is 8 months and some for the 2 older mares. The rest are all mountain horses which are very easy keepers.

Since you really can't figure in the cost of the house for rent they don't have any rent. Our cost is hay. They are broken into sets of 3 to a paddock so it works out to pretty much 4 1/3 bales a day. At $4 a bale we pay about $550 a month for hay. Feed runs around $50. That's a savings of $600 a month.

The rest you would have to pay for if you at the boarding facility so that wouldn't factor in.

The property looks fine for a horse as long as there is an outside water source beside the creek with a water hydrant, with the trees the horse already has shade and some protection from the elements so a small lean to would work to store hay and allow the horse a place to get in. I have noticed more and more people buying this drive in metal garages and closing them in for horse and hay storage.

The last part would be is this in a cold enough climate that you would need to heat the water in winter.

Have fun with your new horse!
     
    12-30-2011, 09:13 AM
  #18
Banned
The hills are not an issue. There are some other possible issues, though. First, is there enough open ground for your horse to run? Unless they have some health issues, horses are healthiest when they can run. Second, horses aren't naturally woods type animals and can easily poke an eye with low dead branches sticking out. Third, I can't really tell what kinds of trees you have there, but some trees/leaves/roots are toxic to horses. If you have no pasture for grazing, and if your horse is turned loose in the woods, it will nibble at whatever it can find - whether it is good for him or not.

I generally don't suggest keeping a horse in a densely wooded environment unless there is an adjacent pasture. But if you don't have an alternative, my suggestion would be to first identify the trees and underbrush to determine if you have anything toxic in there, and second, spend a few days with a bow saw trimming the obvious hazardous dead branches you see - especially those at the head level of your horse.

And don't put a homozygous Appy there...
     
    12-30-2011, 09:41 AM
  #19
Banned
Great point, Face, about toxic plants, can't believe I missed that one.

We have a small, wooded dry lot for the fatsos, and have had to wrap any trees we wanted to keep with chicken wire. Bored horses confined to the dry lot will quickly gnaw bark off and girdle a tree. We also pulled up a lot of poisonous stuff - mostly wild cherry - when we rehabbed our pastures and fenced.

I also agree with limbing up trees, etc., to 6 - 8' above ground as well..
     
    12-30-2011, 11:03 AM
  #20
Weanling
This may depend on area but I'd be concerned about ticks. Do they make flea and tick preventative for horses? If they do you'll need to figure that into your expenses.
     

Tags
donkey, mule, woods

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is there any law about moving a horse off someone else's land without their consent Rider1023 Horse Law 6 09-21-2011 04:04 PM
How to Buy Land DieselPony General Off Topic Discussion 0 05-22-2011 10:58 PM
My land Cowgirl101 Horse Law 15 02-15-2011 02:02 AM
Hi from the land down under! Bears Girl Meet the Community 2 06-02-2009 11:48 PM
Need help from someone who knows about contaminated land Sliding4ever General Off Topic Discussion 4 10-15-2008 06:11 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0