Competition Warmblood and Tbs - difficult to handle? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by ****edEvans View Post
Guess the problem is the way they are fed, when you give them so high-energy food they are hard to control, I can see this with our horses too. If we gave them supplements they tend to be harder to control on the ground or in the saddle. Even the gypsy cob even if he is so mellow almost all the time.
Thihng is that without being fed what they are then they could not preform to the level they are. High Energy food gives them the energy to preform and sparkle but can make them difficult to handle normaly because they are doing a Tigger impression whilst you are leading them.

Reeco my WBx has very very good manners on the ground but occassionaly he can just lose the plot and piaffe on the spot, simply because he is feeling good and he can!!

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post #12 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 09:46 AM Thread Starter
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Thihng is that without being fed what they are then they could not preform to the level they are. High Energy food gives them the energy to preform and sparkle but can make them difficult to handle normaly because they are doing a Tigger impression whilst you are leading them.

Reeco my WBx has very very good manners on the ground but occassionaly he can just lose the plot and piaffe on the spot, simply because he is feeling good and he can!!
I'm thinking that a horse like this would be difficult to clip or to plait? Is this the case or you manage to do it with some patience?

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post #13 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 09:56 AM
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Clipping mine is done with 2 people, steel toe boots, a chain, a twitch and stuffed ears.
He is so sensitive that the action of the big clippers on his skin drives him wacky. Little ones he is fine. Body clipping is a chore for sure.

I leave a halter round his neck to bridle, always have a hand on the reins and you bet I can sit all the fun stuff he throws at me. But I love riding on the days that he is hottest. It's terrifying the amount of power - it always feels like a controlled bolt.
This is however what is needed. He is a "rockstar" personality and turns on and performs. He is peak fit, fed well and trained to be sensitive. That's why he has a CDI win and scores well in general. I compared my CDI scores on him to Florida this year and he is right around where Mette's horse is.

All of the other high level horse I've handled are the same. They all have their quirks, some are fine to plait, some hate it, some are fine to clip, others hate it. Etc..

I have noticed though that if the same horses are let down - they do come off the fitness high and are better to handle. And most of the TBs and WBs that are used for pleasure riding are like most other horses. It is the training and I think the horses that are selected for it and who do well always have had that "spark" to start the fire.
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post #14 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 10:17 AM
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I came straight from the race track into a grooming position at a pro show barn.....after being at the track, it was seriously a piece of cake to be quite honest. But that's after being a foreman at two barns at the track and having to deal with and do a lot of stuff out of the scope of 'strapper'......I really think it depends on your experience level whether or not you will find the horses easy to handle or difficult.
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post #15 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 10:20 AM Thread Starter
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@Anebel: I was hoping that they were calmer than what you are describing but a little challenge should make my life more interesting.
Thanks Anebel, your horse sounds fun to have around but he is sure challenging .

@Muppetgirl: I admit that I'm used to more laid-back horses but I hope that I'll become accustomed with horses with such a high energy level. If I would find the opportunity to learn and get used to them I will take the challenge though I would be upfront with my level of knowledge. I wouldn't be able to act as an experience groom around this kind of horses right now with my level of training. Thank you.

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Last edited by damnedEvans; 02-21-2013 at 10:22 AM.
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post #16 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 10:25 AM
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The level of fitness and management system has a huge amount to do with behaviour. I always found that all the horses I have owned and worked with were like Jekyll and Hyde. For eg - In the winter when the (fox) hunters were in a lot of the time and being worked hard for 2 to 3 hours a day with a full days hunting twice a week they would be very high geared and use the slightest thing as an excuse to release some of that built up energy though I have to say that in the stable situation they all behaved really well because its drummed into them that that's whats expected - on a busy yard you simply don't have the time for prima donna behaviour.
Out of my current 5 I find that when our WB xTB is having a loony turn in the field the moment you put a headcollar/halter on her she is totally calm and obedient - our Clyde x TB - definitely not so much and sometimes it takes some 'stern words' to convince her that its unacceptable behaviour to continue with the prancing about
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post #17 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by ****edEvans View Post
I'm thinking that a horse like this would be difficult to clip or to plait? Is this the case or you manage to do it with some patience?
Reeco is excellent to clip he seems to enjoy it and you can do him totaly loose in his stable (including clipping his ears out).
Plaiting on the other hand is more difficult. I normaly get him in the lorry, pin him in place using the partitions and plait him there, saves me being knocked flying several times

And pulling his tail (required for showing in the UK) is done under sedation (strangely he is fine with his mane).

Popping him out in the field can be a case of taking your life in your hands sometimes as when you take the head collar off there is a massive explosion of energy, normaly it is a case of spin galllop buck, but some times it can be bouncing on his back end or spin buck then gallop (in which case you need to duck quick so you don't get your head taken off)
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post #18 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 10:56 AM Thread Starter
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I know what you mean with getting him to the field, I am always a bit concerned when I have to let a horse free in the arena to run or in a field. Some of them are so happy to be free that they tend to buck all the time and I can't really find a way to take off the halter from a safe distance :)).

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post #19 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 11:12 AM
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Reeco is excellent to clip he seems to enjoy it and you can do him totaly loose in his stable (including clipping his ears out).
Plaiting on the other hand is more difficult. I normaly get him in the lorry, pin him in place using the partitions and plait him there, saves me being knocked flying several times

And pulling his tail (required for showing in the UK) is done under sedation (strangely he is fine with his mane).

Popping him out in the field can be a case of taking your life in your hands sometimes as when you take the head collar off there is a massive explosion of energy, normaly it is a case of spin galllop buck, but some times it can be bouncing on his back end or spin buck then gallop (in which case you need to duck quick so you don't get your head taken off)

Lol mine likes to use untoward feet as launching pads. Almost broke one of the BOs feet once. Now what we do is put him in the field and then take the headcollar off on the other side of the gait/fence. Also, facing him towards the fence helps if you have to be in with him.
He thinks it's funny to try to kick the vet during vet exams (drive by kicking as I call it). He is fine when we are standing there, but if I am trotting by the vet in a straight line WHAM he kicks out. Flexion tests are really fun - we do them mounted now to avoid the handler being thwacked. Hand walking he gives love nips. If you put the wrong blanket on you will get at least an ear pin and a bite warning. You have to watch him at shows because he loooves his turnout and will escape to go run free like a wild horsey and if you chase after him he keeps running, you have to wait for him to come to you (which is awesome to try to explain to people who are trying to "help". It's not helpful if you're driving the horse further away).
He also absolutely hates being lunged. He'll do it for a while and then at some point he bolts so hard and fast that he breaks free. And then it takes 4 people 30 minutes to catch him, with the lunge line trailing behind. So I've learned you just don't let go, because he won't drag you for long Did it once in front of the vet and I didn't let go, got up swearing and just continued lunging. He was like "Errrmmm..." hahaha. He also hates saddle fittings. The try a saddle, trot around, try something else, trot around, fiddle, go again, etc.. drives him mental. I can see him thinking "lets get on with it already!!". Don't even show him a bridle if you're not going to ride. He heaves onto the bit to get the bridle on as quickly as possible and once it's done up he's already headed for the arena. And goodness forbid if you want to do a nice long rein warm up for a whole 15 minutes.

But surprisingly - a really fun horse to hack out, beside roads, in fields, etc.. Just does not like dogs and motorcycles. And don't put any jumps in front of him without grabbing mane - loves it.

They are all a bit quirky!! But holy crap he is so much fun to ride :) People ask me why I always am smiling when riding.
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post #20 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 11:21 AM
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I always turn Reeco to face me when I turn him out. That way he has to spin before he can buck anywhere near my head. It gives me time to get out of the way.

He is generaly lovely to hack out and will do so on a long rein however in the school you have to have him up, forwards and concentrating on something difficult or you will end up on the floor. If it is easy it is fair game for a silly spook, whip round or handstand! This is the pony (yes little pony) that within 8 weeks of being broken was leg yielding like a pro, did 2 dressage tests scoring 58% (because I was to scared to push him forwards so it was an interesting ride, white boards are good to gawp at apparently) and 69% (because I gave myself a kick up the bum and pushed him forwards) Both tests were done with a fractured pelvis! (subsiquently diagnosed and treated).

He is a quirky little thing but I do love him.

ETA Flexion tests on Reeco are a waste of time. A vet who knows what he is doing can make a horse appear lame even if it is sound, except for Reeco, who despite having a fractured pelvis went through a full lameness work up at one of the UK's top vet hospitals, watched by 4 top lameness vets and they could not make him lame! Didnt matter what they did to him he was sound!!

Only my insistance that he wasnt right and one vet thinking that he was a little bit too sensitive when his pelvis was manipulated got us the bone scan that lit up like a christmas tree on his fracture
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Last edited by faye; 02-21-2013 at 11:27 AM.
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