Competition Warmblood and Tbs - difficult to handle? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 11:23 AM Thread Starter
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He's really a character so funny to hear stories about him. Have fun with him Anebel.

"I am not what just I am - I am who I am not yet" (M. Heidegger)
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post #22 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 11:47 AM
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I sometimes think they can look more intimidating than they are because our girl was in one of the Equestrian Colleges prior to the people we bought her off getting her and they were apparently terrified of her. We find her to be a real sweetie and very docile in the stable - no trouble to plait, clip, shoe, pull, trim mane etc. She isnt spooky but she does get very excitable about new things/places - yet never does anything to scare us - though it would worry a novice or someone who over reacted. My welsh cob x TB is exactly the same though, she was so badly behaved at the first few shows she went too that we were asked to leave but she got used to dealing with things in a more moderate manner
This is how she goes out most mornings but there is no malice in her, she stands and waits calmly while you take her headcollar off and if you walked back at at her with it she'd just stop and do exactly as you asked of her - its just high spirits!!!
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post #23 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 11:52 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
I sometimes think they can look more intimidating than they are because our girl was in one of the Equestrian Colleges prior to the people we bought her off getting her and they were apparently terrified of her. We find her to be a real sweetie and very docile in the stable - no trouble to plait, clip, shoe, pull, trim mane etc. She isnt spooky but she does get very excitable about new things/places - yet never does anything to scare us - though it would worry a novice or someone who over reacted. My welsh cob x TB is exactly the same though, she was so badly behaved at the first few shows she went too that we were asked to leave but she got used to dealing with things in a more moderate manner
This is how she goes out most mornings but there is no malice in her, she stands and waits calmly while you take her headcollar off and if you walked back at at her with it she'd just stop and do exactly as you asked of her - its just high spirits!!!
She seems to be a really nice girl. Indeed for a novice or non-horse person anything can be intimidating. I've even seen horse vets that were almost afraid of horses. They reacted at even the slightest move of the horse and was whoa-ing the horse every time so I'm not surprised that they were intimidated by your girl. She is beautiful, good luck with her.

"I am not what just I am - I am who I am not yet" (M. Heidegger)
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post #24 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 04:50 PM
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Rowan sounds like good fun Anebel ;) Spighi is different again, he's now in full work - HARD work 5 days/week with one easy day of either hacking out or popping him over some low cavaletti in the jump arena (I'm still not gutsy enough to actually jump him - the spooks usually mean that we take out 3 or more poles that are a few feet to the left or right of the cavs!!

On the ground, he's like a docile old grandpa horse most of the time. Bring him in and he'll stand quietly and have a snooze - usually while resting his chin on the nearest convenient 'chin rest'. When mucking out his stable or yard with him in it, he will follow me around like a dog, and every time I bend over, he either grabs the back of my pants and wedgies me, or falls asleep with his head on my back.

Saddling he is sensitive, very tickly to brush but oddly enough loves being clipped.
Also very good to plait - if you can't get plaits finished within 10minutes- then we start to jiggle.

Under saddle though, we are quite the explosive little sod!
He has a very big opinion and is sure to let you know about it. For instance, another horse was being led out the other night while I was riding, and had to walk through some crunching leaves. The handler yelled out and told me she was coming, Spighi saw the horse and handler there, kept working, and the second it took a step forward, all hell broke loose. First we went flat out left, then flat out right, then backwards, then tried to bolt, then just humped and jumped on the spot, before finally coming to a halt - Spighi now being a quivering, heart pounding wreck.
The energy did come in handy though, the hind legs work when he's fired up! It's just a matter of controlling it, and it has taken me the last 9 months of riding him, to actually figure out how to control that.

People like to think that warmbloods are big and dopey but this is SO not the case. Spighi is more reactive than any of the young ottbs I have owned and ridden in the past, and I have had some 'interesting' ones.

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post #25 of 25 Old 02-21-2013, 09:11 PM
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For what its worth a lot of ease of handling depends on the horse and its training/temperament. I have spoken to a number of vets, farriers and horse transporters who love working on standardbreds because even though they are performance horses at the track they are easy to handle. They are fed hot, and racing condition but in general are pretty easy to work with. One horse transported loved shipping the standardbreds because he could just walk into the barn, know what horse he was picking up, halter and load the horse without assistance. He said he would never dream of that at a thoroughbred track because the horses would not load easily. That is a general statement and of course their are exceptions to the rule. So, it does come down to handling and lines. That said most horses benefit from confident handling and performance horses are often the most obvious in that benefit. They are often fed hot, stalled long hours and certain bad behaviors are more likely to be tolerated because they do their job well.

I agree that most of the warmbloods I have met had sided more on the "hot blooded" side of the gene pool than the "cold" or "warm". That said I do know some lovely WB who are skilled and easy to handle. Its never good to make generalizations about one breed or another. Its always better to assume the horse will be difficult to handle and be pleasantly surprised as opposed to unpleasantly surprised and hospitalized.
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