Drafts 101
   

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeds

Drafts 101

This is a discussion on Drafts 101 within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • How much weight can a 16 hand irish sports horse carry
  • Pros and cons on buying a irish sport horse

Like Tree1Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    07-06-2008, 05:43 PM
  #1
Green Broke
Drafts 101

So, as we all know I am somewhat new to the horse world. I donít own my own horse, but have been taking lessons and I feel that I am catching on quickly. The lesson horse that I ride is a draft/paint cross; he is the sweetest horse ever and I just absolutely love him. Long before I started riding, I have always had a love for the larger horse; granted, I love all horses big and small, but I tend to favor the draft breeds mostly.

Iíve been on this site for a little while now, and I tend to get a little overwhelmed with the information pouring in here, there is so much to learn, so much to soak in. So, Iím asking for help, itíll be awhile before I am able to buy my own horse, but at this point, Iím leaning toward a draft, or draft cross. However, like a lot of my major Ďpurchasesí (for the lack of a better term) Iíd like to research what Iíd be getting into.

What are some of the pros and cons of owning a draft? I tend to wonder how much of all the information being exchanged on our site actually pertains to drafts. How much extra special treatment do drafts get vs. smaller horses? Do they require a special trailer, tack, hoof care, diet, treats, etc. What makes a draft good for riding? Do they tend to be more spooky, or laid back? Over all, what are their temperaments like? Do they thrive more when they are boarded outdoors, or indoors, or a combination of both? How do I know how much weight a draft can carry? How do I know what discipline would be best for a draft? Are some drafts gaited, if so, which breeds?

I know that a lot of information varies from horse to horse; I know no two are alike, but what are some of YOUR experiences with drafts? Iím really just looking for any information at all, anything you can think of that pertains to draft breeds would be a wonderful help.

Thanks everyone!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    07-06-2008, 05:56 PM
  #2
Showing
There are the obvious differences between the light bred and the drafts or draft crosses. If you go with a draft cross be careful what the cross is and make sure you get familiar with the horse before purchase him/her. (I own 3 horses, one being a light bred, one a draft cross and one a full draft) so I would know.

A lot of people assume that because they are getting a draft, everything will be easier because they tend to be "calmer". In a sense they are a bit easier to work with because they are cold blooded so they usually are more laid back about life. Having said that some can be very stubborn, some are also VERY mellow which makes it harder to convince them to do something. You also can get the ones get excited very easily and need an experienced hand as they will get strong or look and spook at things etc.

Because you have little experience with horses I would recommend for you to stick with a light breed. A horse that has done a lot of different things. A horse that will be easier to work with and a horse that will teach more so than be taught.

There is so much to learn about horses! Give yourself a break and have fun. Learn from a seasoned horse then decide if you want to move to something bigger :)
     
    07-06-2008, 06:06 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Thanks for the info M2G!

So, in the sense of sticking with a lighter breed, which breed (lighter) would be better suited for carrying a larger rider?
     
    07-06-2008, 06:26 PM
  #4
Foal
Hehe,

I'll be honest...my first horse was a draft horse...I had very little horse experience (very little) and I was like 16 years old or something like that. My draft has treated me well. Now, I am NOT saying that you should go out and get a draft horse because they are 'great' first horses for the inexperienced! M2G has good points!! You might want to start with a smaller breed...I think it depends on the horse.

Here is my 'personal' experience with my draft.

Everything is usually more expensive. Bigger farrier bills, boarding is more, supplies are more (because I need more), food is more (once again, because I need more to keep her ideal). The vet is more, worming is more. How much more, well....my farrier does regular horses for $40, I pay $65. That's not that bad but other farriers are worse. I have to use two wormer tubes to worm her, so that's double the price of a smaller horse. I'll just say,for me, personally, a light breed horse would be alot cheaper to own in general.

It's also hard for me to find things that fit her. I usually always have to order things (tack, blankets, ect..) 87" sheets aren't found in my local feed store.

My draft horse tends to need a lot of upkeep too. I can't just let her sit in a pasture...she'd fall apart. The flies love her! Her feathers need constant care too. If you got a non feathered breed, you wouldn't have that work.

I can ride and drive her. She's much better at driving though... She very mellow, but at the same time, she has a lot of perk to get up and go. She's fun! I've also noticed that she's an eye catcher (most drafts are). I always get compliments and such...she stands out!


I love my big goofy girl...she cost alot though...I'll have her till she dies and I'll miss her soo much when she does...I enjoy her alot!

I would say that, just find a horse that you like. Find one with an attitude that you like and can deal with. Find one with movement and build that suits your needs. If it happens to be a draft, GREAT!! Just keep in mind, drafts do tend to be more expensive in care...at least, that's my experience.


And don't let them step on your foot!! OUCH!!!
     
    07-06-2008, 06:34 PM
  #5
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxie
Thanks for the info M2G!

So, in the sense of sticking with a lighter breed, which breed (lighter) would be better suited for carrying a larger rider?
Oh sorry I missed that piece of info. If that is the reason why you are considering for a large breed, then it is a bit different. Tho there are light bred horses that are large in build that would also be suitable.

Do you know of someone who has a draft you could try? Not all people who like drafts, should own one. Draft handle differently riding wise than their smaller counter part. I would make sure you are ok with their feel and handling when riding. Not all people like them.

There are full drafts that are well broke that have been up for sale.Here are a few older adds, to give you an idea.

http://horsetopia.horse-for-sale.org...fieds/ad309952

http://horsetopia.horse-for-sale.org...fieds/ad292809

http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse...rse_id=1243551
     
    07-06-2008, 06:41 PM
  #6
Foal
Personally I'd go with a draft cross. An Irish sport horse, a percheron/QH or /TB or something like that. The angle of their shoulder is less upright lending to a better riding horse. You get the calm disposition (usually) and smooth gaits in a smaller package that won't be as expensive. They tend to have good feet and keep weight on more easily then, say, a TB. Id go for one a little older. Maybe 15 to 18 and about 16 hands which is a reasonable height while being manageable (and mountable) Depending on how much cold blood in your cross, a 16 hand horse could hold 175 (maybe even 200) pounds, even if you bounce a bit.
     
    07-06-2008, 06:46 PM
  #7
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by flywithoutwings
Personally I'd go with a draft cross. An Irish sport horse, a percheron/qh or /tb or something like that. The angle of their shoulder is less upright lending to a better riding horse. You get the calm disposition (usually) and smooth gaits in a smaller package that won't be as expensive. They tend to have good feet and keep weight on more easily then, say, a tb. Id go for one a little older. Maybe 15 to 18 and about 16 hands which is a reasonable height while being manageable (and mountable) Depending on how much cold blood in your cross, a 16 hand horse could hold 175 (maybe even 200) pounds, even if you bounce a bit.
That's when getting familiar with the horse in question is very important. I don't know of a single Perch/TB cross I would ever buy and find the Irish Sport Horses very tempermental.
     
    07-06-2008, 06:50 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Yes, as it is right now, I am a larger rider. I plan on loosing like a million pounds HOPEFULLY before buying a horse, but I am going on what I am right now. My weight isn't the only factor in wanting a draft breed, although I will admit it is at the top of my list. Just the draw I have to them, and of course wanting a horse that isn't going to buckle under my weight. Lol

I ride a draft cross now, my Fritzy boy. He is wonderful, of course I am only with him for about 2 hrs every week, so, who really knows WHAT he's like. I have considered leasing him, that is still very much up in the air. Fritz is up for sale as well, and if all goes as planned, and he is still up for sale when I am looking to buy, he will be at the VERY top of my list, as I feel he would be a great companion, I would be learning everything with him, and I would already have a connection with him; it just seems like the best bet, ya know?

So, anyone know of any lighter breeds that are okay with heavier loads?
     
    07-06-2008, 06:59 PM
  #9
Green Broke
I thought I would post a pic of Fritz and I

Kcole34 likes this.
     
    07-06-2008, 07:18 PM
  #10
Foal
I think for the lighter breeds it is definitely a matter of the individual. A foundation type Quarter Horse witha broad chest and strong bones is a lot different from a dainty narrow one. The general rule of thumb is 20% of the horse's weight can be carried (including saddle) by the horse.
My2Geldings, the first horse I ever trotted on was a Perch/appendix (qh/tb) who was an absolute doll and started all of the adult beginners. There is also a Perch/qh cross at my barn now who packs a timid, larger woman around the hunter ring very well. My friend owns two Irish sport horses, one a 25% and one a 50% both excellent eventers at preliminary level and moving up. I've also known at least a dozen other ID crosses and only one of them would not have made my short list.
     

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0