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Dressage Breeds

This is a discussion on Dressage Breeds within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Smooth breed dressage
  • "dressage breeds" AND spots

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    11-22-2012, 04:05 PM
  #11
Foal
I would say it depends on how far you want to go in dressage and what your budget is. I personally like Holsteiners and Hanovarians the best. Most horses with the stallion Donerhall in their background are great for dressage. You could also try leasing differnt horses for a couple months to see which type of horse you like the best. Best of luck!!!
     
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    11-26-2012, 04:39 PM
  #12
Started
I know I am outside the box on this one. I also know that my breed bias will come out but, consider a standardbred. Great brain, height, a wonderful extended or collected trot and a smooth as butter canter. They also are willing to do whatever their rider would like. I have a few friends who do dressage with their standardbreds and really would not do it with any other breed. I am looking into doing dressage with mine as he really seems to enjoy it.
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    11-26-2012, 05:50 PM
  #13
Yearling
I think there was a Irish Sports Horse competing in the Grand Prix dressage, though can't remember 100% is it was show jumping.
     
    11-26-2012, 06:00 PM
  #14
Banned
Holsteiners all the way!
Thyme likes this.
     
    11-26-2012, 10:38 PM
  #15
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by rookie    
I know I am outside the box on this one. I also know that my breed bias will come out but, consider a standardbred. Great brain, height, a wonderful extended or collected trot and a smooth as butter canter. They also are willing to do whatever their rider would like. I have a few friends who do dressage with their standardbreds and really would not do it with any other breed. I am looking into doing dressage with mine as he really seems to enjoy it.
I'm pretty open about breeds in Dressage, but I'm definitely not a fan of standies. Yes, SOME *read, minority* have a conformation good enough to do quite well without breaking down, but the majority of them are definitely not built for the sport if you wish to be competitive and/or ride at higher levels with a greater need for collection.
     
    11-26-2012, 11:01 PM
  #16
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by steedaunh32    
What are your favorites? Does anyone that rides dressage own a Haflinger? Just curious, as I am beginning lessons soon with the hopes and goal of owning again in the next year or so...I like the shorter guys but it seems most dressage prospects or experienced horses are huge! Looking for opinions...
Arabian!

I've seen a few haffies at low level shows. But then again I see just about everything there! I don't go to the fancy shows often and when I do I'm usually working and can't see much of who is riding what.
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    11-27-2012, 07:35 PM
  #17
Started
KayTy I agree that not all standies are designed for it, just like not all warmbloods are designed for it. I think they are just as likely to break down as thoroughbreds that are just as often selected for the events. I would personally never own a warmblood or a thoroughbred as I don't often meet one that I like. That's neither here nor there, and I don't see us convincing either one the opposite direction.

I think in the end the OP needs to pick a breed she likes and decide the level she wants to pursue. In the end, what is more important the event or the horse? If you want a horse you will have fun with then go with a halfie. If you want a horse that will excel at dressage and take you to the highest levels than look for a horse with the features that will allow that. If the OP wants a halfie she should get one. In the end, she will probably have more fun doing dressage with a horse and breed she likes than in doing something with a breed she does not like. In the end, all horses require the same amount of care.
     
    11-27-2012, 07:45 PM
  #18
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by rookie    
KayTy I agree that not all standies are designed for it, just like not all warmbloods are designed for it. I think they are just as likely to break down as thoroughbreds that are just as often selected for the events. I would personally never own a warmblood or a thoroughbred as I don't often meet one that I like. That's neither here nor there, and I don't see us convincing either one the opposite direction.

I think in the end the OP needs to pick a breed she likes and decide the level she wants to pursue. In the end, what is more important the event or the horse? If you want a horse you will have fun with then go with a halfie. If you want a horse that will excel at dressage and take you to the highest levels than look for a horse with the features that will allow that. If the OP wants a halfie she should get one. In the end, she will probably have more fun doing dressage with a horse and breed she likes than in doing something with a breed she does not like. In the end, all horses require the same amount of care.
I think the point is that conformation is a big part. If the horse doesn't have conformation appropriate for the discipline then it won't do as well as a horse that does. I'm not picky with breeds, as I love all horses and don't bash any disciplines (unless they harm the animal, of course). I'm sure there are a few wonderful Standies out there who would do well in dressage, as I'm sure there are some WBs out there who aren't cut out for it. Heck, I'm only schooling my TB in lower level stuff just because it's good for him to have something to do and jumping is out of the question right now. Peace
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    11-27-2012, 07:47 PM
  #19
Started
I completely agree Reno. I think if the OP has her heart set on a halfie she should look for a halfie that has the conformation to do dressage. It might take awhile but she could have her cake and eat it too.
core likes this.
     
    11-27-2012, 08:01 PM
  #20
Trained
Conformation is exactly what I was getting at. I have seen so few stb's that are suited to Dressage beyond Elementary level, that I could count them on one hand.
Just like how many warmbloods do you see that could do well in harness racing against stbs?

Tb's can be hit and miss. Some have excellent conformation for Dressage - I had a stunning grey with the most beautiful hock and knee action, uphill, short back that swung so naturally.
But again, the majority of racing bred tb's are not cut out for it.

Compare 100 Dressage bred WB's to 100 racing bred TB's to 100 racing bred STB's.
The warmbloods are going to win out on the Dressage ability. Sure, some won't be any good, but if they're bred in the purple, you've got about a 90% strike rate that they'll do well. If we're talking Grand Prix, it's significantly less - and in those groups of 100, maybe 2 warmbloods will Grand Prix, if you're REALLY lucky with the TB and team it up with a fantastic rider, maybe 1 will GP, and the STB's.... well you'd need a much bigger selection to chose from than 100.

Absolutely, if you love a breed and want to get that breed over doing well in a sport, then you go and get that breed.
BUT, if you want to be serious in a sport, it's best to find yourself a talented and purpose bred horse.
Just like for Cutting or Reining, you'd be far more likely to pick a QH than a WB.

It's horses for courses. Not breed prejudice, just truth. And I've competed Dressage on multiple breeds, but none have been as talented as my warmblood. Luckily I enjoy warmbloods, and have managed to select two that I get on with very well. Both are very sweet and affectionate, but talented in Dressage.
AllieJ333 likes this.
     

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