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Dressage Breeds

This is a discussion on Dressage Breeds within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        11-27-2012, 08:11 PM
      #21
    Foal
    I'm definitely partial to Arabian crosses.
    Maybe an Arabian/Hanoverian cross. The extension, impulsion, and collection (including headset) of a Hanoverian mixed with the beauty, elegance, and free, floating gaits of the Arabian.
    Ah, now I kind of want one... :'D oops.

    I know a lot of people are big on purebreds, but every breed has their own talents and weaknesses. Why not try and combine both talents and try to minimize the weaknesses?
         
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        11-27-2012, 08:13 PM
      #22
    Green Broke
    I have yet to find a sinle standardbred that is suitable for dressage. The majority can't canter and have a useless walk.
         
        11-27-2012, 08:27 PM
      #23
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by InsaneDino    
    I'm definitely partial to Arabian crosses.
    Maybe an Arabian/Hanoverian cross. The extension, impulsion, and collection (including headset) of a Hanoverian mixed with the beauty, elegance, and free, floating gaits of the Arabian.
    Ah, now I kind of want one... :'D oops.

    I know a lot of people are big on purebreds, but every breed has their own talents and weaknesses. Why not try and combine both talents and try to minimize the weaknesses?
    One of my boys is a Hanoverian x TB (TB mare was approved into the Hanoverian studbook as a foundation mare and scored 8.5's in the performance and breeding test by the head of the Hano German stud book). I like some of the crosses, but you really do need to cross two very compatible horses with quality on both sides. My 2 year olds dam, as I said above, was rated extremely highly as a hanoverian breeding candidate by the visiting German assessor. He said out of the whole of Australia, she was one of his favourite TB broodmares and that we should be breeding with her type more and more to add refinement and athleticism into the Hanoverian breed.
    Crossing with TB's is very common.

    There are some nice Arab x WB's around as well, though I see less of them out doing well than I do of the WBxTB's. I think you really need to pick the arab of the combination as they can throw awful looking things as well.
         
        11-27-2012, 08:28 PM
      #24
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by faye    
    I have yet to find a sinle standardbred that is suitable for dressage. The majority can't canter and have a useless walk.
    I've seen one STB stud around here that is really quite nice as far as STB's go - even has a nice head! But it's still nowhere near the quality of conformation as a well bred warmblood.
         
        11-27-2012, 11:35 PM
      #25
    Started
    You know what forget I mentioned it. I knew it was a bad idea to even think of mentioning it. I was interested in dressage but you sort of reminded me why I quit years ago. You even consider doing something outside the warmblood cult and you are inferior (thats another rant for another time). You all keep your warmbloods and I will keep my ugly/useless/only good for trotting and dog food/can't canter/can't walk/big headed horse and be perfectly happy.
         
        11-27-2012, 11:43 PM
      #26
    Trained
    Wow rookie, over reaction!!!!

    Everyone without a warmblood seems to hold a massive grudge against those with a warmblood. Only reason I have warmbloods, is because I've worked my backside off and gone without a huge amount in order to afford them.
    Because I'm not a fan of STB's doesn't mean I'm in a 'warmblood cult'... I think you've seen red and completely misinterpreted anything I've said, hearing only "STB's suck" or something along those misinformed lines. It gets really quite frustrating, as soon as you say you ride Dressage and have a warmblood, you are immediately guilty or being snob, having a 'pack mentality', being elitist, assuming everyone is inferior.... sheesh, people, GET OVER IT! Yeah, there's a handful of people who think that they are the be all and end all because they have a warmblood, generally those are the people who's parents have money flowing from their behinds and brought their lovely child a very expensive, pre-trained horse. The rest of us want to pursue Dressage seriously, and understand that the best way to do that, is to invest in a horse that is purspose bred for the sport - which happens to be a warmblood.

    Faye and I have both not seen many STB's that have been build to suit Dressage. If we're talking Dressage at a competitive and reasonably high level - and going by the title of this thread I'd assume that is the direction it was intended - then no, a STB is not a recommended breed.

    I've trained and competed multiple ottbs, appy's, qh's, various ponies, a percheron x qh and others I'm sure! So please, do not tell me that I'm in a 'warmblood cult'.
    Tigo, minstrel and AllieJ333 like this.
         
        11-27-2012, 11:48 PM
      #27
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayty    
    Wow rookie, over reaction!!!!

    Everyone without a warmblood seems to hold a massive grudge against those with a warmblood. Only reason I have warmbloods, is because I've worked my backside off and gone without a huge amount in order to afford them.
    Because I'm not a fan of STB's doesn't mean I'm in a 'warmblood cult'... I think you've seen red and completely misinterpreted anything I've said, hearing only "STB's suck" or something along those misinformed lines. It gets really quite frustrating, as soon as you say you ride Dressage and have a warmblood, you are immediately guilty or being snob, having a 'pack mentality', being elitist, assuming everyone is inferior.... sheesh, people, GET OVER IT! Yeah, there's a handful of people who think that they are the be all and end all because they have a warmblood, generally those are the people who's parents have money flowing from their behinds and brought their lovely child a very expensive, pre-trained horse. The rest of us want to pursue Dressage seriously, and understand that the best way to do that, is to invest in a horse that is purspose bred for the sport - which happens to be a warmblood.

    Faye and I have both not seen many STB's that have been build to suit Dressage. If we're talking Dressage at a competitive and reasonably high level - and going by the title of this thread I'd assume that is the direction it was intended - then no, a STB is not a recommended breed.

    I've trained and competed multiple ottbs, appy's, qh's, various ponies, a percheron x qh and others I'm sure! So please, do not tell me that I'm in a 'warmblood cult'.
    I think the disdain some of us have for warmblood owners is just that we meet waaaaay too many of the conceited, my-horse-is-better-than-yours-in-every-single-way type of people. I have nothing against a good horse or the people who own them. My personal problem arises when they decide that they are superior to everyone else and think they have some sort of duty to let us know at every turn that no matter what our "lesser" horses are worth less than the manure they excrete. I don't care that your horse is lovely...just don't go telling me that mine is a useless piece of crap XD

    In fact, quite unfortunately, my entire experience with people who have WBs has consisted of that type...aside from perhaps one or two people here (albeit, I don't know any of you in person).
         
        11-27-2012, 11:56 PM
      #28
    Trained
    Well, I don't believe I have EVER told a single person that their horse is a 'worthless piece of manure'.
    I am honest, and if I see a horse that I don't think will excell in what the owner is wanting it to, I will speak up. But I ALWAYS explain why I am of that opinion. I have never told anything that they MUST get a WB to be good at anything.
    I think people that get their noses out of joint about warmblood owners, often judge before they speak to that person, and that assumption gets in the way of the truth.
    I have always taught people who do not own warmbloods, and only over the last 3 years have I had my own warmbloods to compete.
    As I've said thousands of times (I feel like a broken record) I started out with a multitude of other breeds and did well on them.

    But if a horse just isn't cut out for something, then it just isn't. That's not snobbery, its just honest. I understand that people don't want to hear any kind of negative feedback on their horses, and if that's the case, don't ask anyone for advice. Us 'warmblood people' cop A LOT of flack over our choice of horse, probably more so than what the 'non-warmblood' people do.
    AllieJ333 likes this.
         
        11-28-2012, 12:00 AM
      #29
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayty    
    Well, I don't believe I have EVER told a single person that their horse is a 'worthless piece of manure'.
    I am honest, and if I see a horse that I don't think will excell in what the owner is wanting it to, I will speak up. But I ALWAYS explain why I am of that opinion. I have never told anything that they MUST get a WB to be good at anything.
    I think people that get their noses out of joint about warmblood owners, often judge before they speak to that person, and that assumption gets in the way of the truth.
    I have always taught people who do not own warmbloods, and only over the last 3 years have I had my own warmbloods to compete.
    As I've said thousands of times (I feel like a broken record) I started out with a multitude of other breeds and did well on them.

    But if a horse just isn't cut out for something, then it just isn't. That's not snobbery, its just honest. I understand that people don't want to hear any kind of negative feedback on their horses, and if that's the case, don't ask anyone for advice. Us 'warmblood people' cop A LOT of flack over our choice of horse, probably more so than what the 'non-warmblood' people do.
    I like to hear things my horse can improve on, if possible. That's not what my experience has been away from this forum, which is the problem. Even people who haven't ever seen my horse will automatically turn up their nose and act all superior as soon as I mention anything about owning a Thoroughbred. That particular kind of behavior, in my opinion, is downright rude.

    I LOVE warmbloods. They're gorgeous. I just don't like the bad apples that crop up in the people that own them. You, however, are not one of those thankfully (or so you have appeared).
         
        11-28-2012, 12:04 AM
      #30
    Trained
    My favourite horse was a thoroughbred, I don't think I'll ever be able to replace him, no matter how good any new horses are.
    If you've read any of my posts in training/riding etc. I will always, without fail, try to give the poster advice on what they can do to improve the horse that they have.

    That issue is NOTHING to do with people owning warmbloods. Don't try and throw it into the mix to add more ammunition.
    It really does irk me that we all get heaped into the same basket. As soon as I type a response I'm deemed a warmblood snob if I didn't tell the poster that they're perfect in every way. It's really quite infuriating, and does make me hesitant to offer advice. I am here because I like to help other people with issues they're having with their horses, and frequently take a lot of time to come up with a response for them.
    Muppetgirl likes this.
         

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