Dressage Breeds - Page 5
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeds

Dressage Breeds

This is a discussion on Dressage Breeds within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

    Like Tree66Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        11-28-2012, 06:22 AM
      #41
    Weanling
    Clydesdales are relatively new to the dressage arena but make fabulous dressage horses. They have fabulous movement and considering their size, are very light on thier feet. They are moving up in competitions and I think it wont be too long before we see them competing at top level. My wee lad (18hh) has won his novice and intermediate class. I am so proud of him.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        11-28-2012, 06:43 AM
      #42
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BBBCrone    
    This brings up a good point. I would think Arabs would be wonderful in this sport at high levels. Is there a reason they aren't up there? I'm guessing this is a newbie question but I know absolutely zero about dressage. I just love to watch it :)
    I was heavily into Arabs when I was younger. Most don't have the hind end to do high level dressage. What I ran into is the majority are very straight in the croup, with straight hind legs. Some lines are still bred for athleticism under saddle, and they've done quite well in dressage (with the right trainer).

    I have seen a few really nice Arab thoroughbred crosses. I was impressed with the Arab friesian cross I saw. But I think the warmblood Arab crosses usually look like someone just added pieces together at random (I did see one that looked good).

    It really just comes back to correct conformation for dressage. If you can find an Arab, or Arab cross, that's got the conformation for dressage then it can do well. If not, it's a struggle when you start working on collection.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    gypsygirl likes this.
         
        11-28-2012, 07:35 AM
      #43
    Green Broke
    Bluebird, there is no such thing as an intermediate dressage test.

    There are 2 Intermediare levels but you would never be doing Inter 1 or 2 on a horse that is also doing novice as Inter 1 is higher than PSG.

    Pure Clydesdales do not generaly have the conformation/strength behind to do upper level work however there have been a few very sucessful Clydesdale x TB dressage horses (upto PSG I think)
    ~*~anebel~*~ likes this.
         
        11-28-2012, 08:17 AM
      #44
    Yearling
    As soon as you say warmbloods are the best breed for upper level dressage....

    In a similarly themed thread, I posted a picture of my draft cross and asked if people thought she would be suitable for reining. As expected, several people took me seriously and explained that she did not have the right conformation for a reining horse and, surprise, surprise, no one went nuts and accused them of being quarter horse snobs.

    Funny how that works.
    ~*~anebel~*~, Chiilaa and minstrel like this.
         
        11-28-2012, 08:37 AM
      #45
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by faye    
    bluebird, there is no such thing as an intermediate dressage test.

    There are 2 Intermediare levels but you would never be doing Inter 1 or 2 on a horse that is also doing novice as Inter 1 is higher than PSG.

    Pure Clydesdales do not generaly have the conformation/strength behind to do upper level work however there have been a few very sucessful Clydesdale x TB dressage horses (upto PSG I think)
    I think before anyone starts to criticise pure Clydedales having or not having the 'right' look to do dressage, actually needs to do two things: First-ride a Clydesdale (not a cross or a heavy cob but the real thing). Secondly, go and watch Clydesdales do dressage. You may find your jaw falling on the floor. Have a look at this video and then tell me agin what you said....LOL
         
        11-28-2012, 08:52 AM
      #46
    Trained
    Bluebird, one does not need to ride or own a horse to have a valid opinion on its conformation. It's not about the 'right look', it's the 'right build'. We look at the build because a correct build with make the sport mitch easier for the horse.
    Yes like any breed, there are a handful of clydies that might do alright in dressage, but that doesn't mean that they are all going to go FEI. They are built to pull things with their front legs - this has been red into them for hundreds of years. Just as warmbloods have been been bred for hundreds of years to carry weight on their haunches. I have yet to see a Clyde with quality enough paces to be competitive in dressage, and most of these 'clydies doing dressage' videos do not show them in true collection.
    Like friesians, they bend their knees and hocks a bit to look fan y pulling a cart, but don't sit behind.
    I think they're gorgeous horses and it's lovely seeing them being competed in dressage, but for the serious, competitive dressage rider they are just not suited.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        11-28-2012, 09:02 AM
      #47
    Green Broke
    Nope no jaws dropping, I see a horse that is at the limit of its ability, is struggling to sit on its hocks and is not straight, the half pirouette in walk was not good. It is doing its best (and doing it well enough) but it is not easy for it. It is struggling to collect and conciquently the quality of movement is not there

    I know enought about the clydesdale conformation to be able to comment on it as I worked one summer at a heavy horse centre doing displays, showing inhand, riding, schooling and generaly educating visitors about the breeds of heavy horse. They had a soppy Clyde stallion called Sam who was gorgeous and honestly tried his best for me but he just was not built for dressage. They are built to pull which means that whilst there is driving power in the hind end the slight croup high nature of the breed (slightly croup high being a desired trait in Clydes) makes it very difficult for them to get their behind underthem sufficiently for dressage and making them tend dump onto thier forehand.

    I have ridden quite a few clydes and shires.

    When you cross a clyde with a TB in general you tend to loose the croup high aspect and lighten the forehand making it more athletic.

    ETA oops Kayty I crossposted with you, I agree it is not hte look it is the build that they don't have.
    ~*~anebel~*~, Kayty and minstrel like this.
         
        11-28-2012, 09:15 AM
      #48
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by steedaunh32    
    What are your favorites? Does anyone that rides dressage own a Haflinger? Just curious, as I am beginning lessons soon with the hopes and goal of owning again in the next year or so...I like the shorter guys but it seems most dressage prospects or experienced horses are huge! Looking for opinions...

    I have a haflinger mare and hope to do more dressage next year, my riding instructor thinks she has a lovely action and good potential.

    One day....
    In our dreams...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUiC...Y&feature=plcp
         
        11-28-2012, 09:37 AM
      #49
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayty    
    Bluebird, one does not need to ride or own a horse to have a valid opinion on its conformation. It's not about the 'right look', it's the 'right build'. We look at the build because a correct build with make the sport mitch easier for the horse.
    Yes like any breed, there are a handful of clydies that might do alright in dressage, but that doesn't mean that they are all going to go FEI. They are built to pull things with their front legs - this has been red into them for hundreds of years. Just as warmbloods have been been bred for hundreds of years to carry weight on their haunches. I have yet to see a Clyde with quality enough paces to be competitive in dressage, and most of these 'clydies doing dressage' videos do not show them in true collection.
    Like friesians, they bend their knees and hocks a bit to look fan y pulling a cart, but don't sit behind.
    I think they're gorgeous horses and it's lovely seeing them being competed in dressage, but for the serious, competitive dressage rider they are just not suited.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Well I have seen some fabulous Clydesdales doing excellent dressage, especially in Scotland. We'll wait and see who has the last laugh. As I said, they haven't been doing it for too long on a competitive level but all it takes is the right horse and the right rider. Too many people are far too quick to label horses they know absolutely nothing about.
         
        11-28-2012, 09:41 AM
      #50
    Green Broke
    Some people are far to quick to train horses for things that they are just not suitable for and then wonder why they don't get good results or the horse breaks down on them.

    You wouldnt expect a shetland pony to do well at BSJA showjumping, or a highland pony in a flat race! Yes you will always get the exception to the rule, but in general those exceptions are not good examples of the breed in the first place.

    Bluebird, have you ever owned connies or warmbloods or TB's or Quarter horses? By your own logic if you've never owned one then you have no right to comment on anything even the training of those breeds.

    You've already prooven your ignorance of dressage might be time to stop digging that hole.
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Breeds for dressage? MethowHorses25 Horse Breeds 20 04-18-2011 12:24 AM
    Non traditional breeds in dressage. Spyder Dressage 33 06-19-2009 03:55 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:33 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0