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Dressage Breeds

This is a discussion on Dressage Breeds within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
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    11-28-2012, 05:10 PM
  #61
Yearling
It's an American gaited horse. Never seen one out here. I just had a look at YouTube and there are plenty of examples of people doing lower level with them, except for this video, which looks like PSG. It's all right. Still doesn't look like it has the carrying power behind of warmbloods.


If you're after a "non-traditional" breed for your FEI dressage, that's fantastic, but you'll have to look hard and get lucky. Because I like an easy life, I'd buy an Iberian if that's what I wanted to do.
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    11-28-2012, 05:19 PM
  #62
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebird    
I'm not familiar with what a saddlebred is. Can you explain?

This is a Saddlebred https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRpjVbiUIAA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n3ynW0fDBuI

But they most commonly are used here as Park Horses. Shown in 3 gaited and 5 gaited classes. Like this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKzF0muYS3A Contrary to recent popular belief, these are not sored horses and are not BIG LICK horses. These horses are bred to move like that, and enhanced through collection and muscling just like in dressage.

More breed information. American Saddlebreds At Work and Play
I honestly believe them to be one of the more diverse breeds and have a great work ethic "game" and are also amazingly sensitive, gentle horses. Often great with jr. Riders and even elderly. There used to be a woman in her late 70's early 80's that still showed park horses. She was amazing and I hope I can still ride like that at that age.
     
    11-28-2012, 06:56 PM
  #63
Foal
I don't know that this thread has been very helpful to the OP - it may be true that to compete at "the very highest levels of dressage" one needs a Warmblood-type mount, at least these days. However, most people just don't compete at those levels. Many horses can be successful dressage mounts and bring lots of excitement and fun to the majority of riders.

I prefer my horses in the 15-16 hand range and love the underdogs so I'd rather work on a smallish thoroughbred or one of the shorter breeds. Everyone knows this horse, I guess, but he's worth watching again and again -


No disrespect meant to Warmbloods, honest.
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    11-28-2012, 07:14 PM
  #64
Trained
Maisie,
My warmblood is only 15.2hh with fully imported lines.
My 2 year old WB x TB is probably going to max out at 16hh... 16.1hh if I'm lucky.
They're not all 18hh monsters ;)
     
    11-28-2012, 07:17 PM
  #65
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by maisie    
I don't know that this thread has been very helpful to the OP - it may be true that to compete at "the very highest levels of dressage" one needs a Warmblood-type mount, at least these days. However, most people just don't compete at those levels. Many horses can be successful dressage mounts and bring lots of excitement and fun to the majority of riders.

I prefer my horses in the 15-16 hand range and love the underdogs so I'd rather work on a smallish thoroughbred or one of the shorter breeds. Everyone knows this horse, I guess, but he's worth watching again and again -

Seldom Seen Retirement Dressage At Devon 1987 - YouTube

No disrespect meant to Warmbloods, honest.
I love it, I love it, I love it, I love it. See, that is what happens when people say "what? Why Can't I do it?" and they try. Told again and again, she couldn't do it and... I did it, I did it, I did it. Just imagine if more would follow suit. Great little horse there. Thanks for sharing that fun and inspirational video of the horse that could, and did.
     
    11-28-2012, 09:10 PM
  #66
Foal
I just bought a haflinger gelding and once we get a few things worked out he's going to be a great dressage horse. My trainer was really impressed at his size (15.2ish), conformation, and movement. I was told his father shows grand prix dressage. We are getting over some issues with him paying attention to me and his job but other then that he is AWESOME. I never regret buying him and can't wait to show him! If you are thinking of a hafligner I would for sure look into it more!
     
    11-28-2012, 09:32 PM
  #67
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by maisie    
I don't know that this thread has been very helpful to the OP - it may be true that to compete at "the very highest levels of dressage" one needs a Warmblood-type mount, at least these days. However, most people just don't compete at those levels. Many horses can be successful dressage mounts and bring lots of excitement and fun to the majority of riders.

I prefer my horses in the 15-16 hand range and love the underdogs so I'd rather work on a smallish thoroughbred or one of the shorter breeds. Everyone knows this horse, I guess, but he's worth watching again and again -

Seldom Seen Retirement Dressage At Devon 1987 - YouTube

No disrespect meant to Warmbloods, honest.
Thank you very much for sharing that. It is truly an inspiration.
     
    11-29-2012, 11:02 AM
  #68
Foal
Quote:
My warmblood is only 15.2hh with fully imported lines.
My 2 year old WB x TB is probably going to max out at 16hh... 16.1hh if I'm lucky

Read more: Dressage Breeds
That's true. However, I still maintain that there are horses of a variety of breeds that can compete in dressage at the levels that most of us will reach, and these are not shining exceptions like Seldom Seen. I for instance, really want to pursue dressage for as long as I enjoy it. I'm 57 and have been re-riding for 2 years. A Halflinger, Morgan, Arabian, OTTB or anything with the right general conformation & personality would be awesome for me to take to maybe levels 1 & 2, especially since I may seldom or never ride in a recognized show. There are also some Warmbloods that might suit me, but I don't consider it necessary.

That's all I'm saying.
     
    11-29-2012, 03:40 PM
  #69
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by maisie    
I don't know that this thread has been very helpful to the OP - it may be true that to compete at "the very highest levels of dressage" one needs a Warmblood-type mount, at least these days. However, most people just don't compete at those levels. Many horses can be successful dressage mounts and bring lots of excitement and fun to the majority of riders.

I prefer my horses in the 15-16 hand range and love the underdogs so I'd rather work on a smallish thoroughbred or one of the shorter breeds. Everyone knows this horse, I guess, but he's worth watching again and again -

Seldom Seen Retirement Dressage At Devon 1987 - YouTube

No disrespect meant to Warmbloods, honest.
I really like what you're saying about dressage!
     
    11-30-2012, 12:39 AM
  #70
Banned
I guess I'm not understanding the problem. I didn't pick up that anyone was saying you could not use XYZ horse in dressage. All they were saying was that to reach the highest levels of that sport, you'd be better off going with breeds that were designed for it. You might get an exception to the rule. It does happen. But if your plan is to do it big, you might find the path of least resistance a much easier road to follow.

If I'm going to be going out cutting cattle I'll be looking for that athletic, quick, low to the ground Quarter Horse that can get low, dip and dive and turn on a dime. I could do this on a different breed for sure. But will it be as graceful or done as well? Probably not. Exceptions to the rule not withstanding of course. :)

And just for fun ... this was one of my favorites to watch. May she RIP.

~*~anebel~*~ and Chiilaa like this.
     

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