Friesians
 
 

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Friesians

This is a discussion on Friesians within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Avarage size of a yearling friesian
  • Are Friesian Cross with Quarter horse a good eventing horse

 
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    02-11-2009, 04:44 PM
  #1
Showing
Friesians

I believe we have a couple friesian owners on here but me not being familiar with them I would love to hear some advice. Now keep in mind that tho I am wanting to educate my friesian knowledge further I am not looking into buying for myself I love them and I think they are stunning but know of someone who might be buying one and so my wheels got turning.

Let's say I were to start looking into buying a friesian, what are some things I should be looking at that are specific to them? Are there any comfo faults or health problems specific to that breed? Are there characteristics that are both good/bad that I should be looking for?

What is the average height and weight of a well bred friesian? What are things YOU would be asking when searching for the right friesian?

Thanks guys.
     
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    02-11-2009, 05:49 PM
  #2
Showing
Are friesians hot to ride? I was told they aren't but it seems to me like they really are more sensitive and react more than your more common breed. What are they like undersaddle? I always tell people to choose a purebred vs a cross when buying a horse BUT if you lived in a hunter/jumper populated area, would you think a purebred friesian or a cross be more of a resale appropriate decision? As I said, I would never go for anything but a purebred. To me there are so many horses around and the economy has been so bad for so long that owning a papered horse only makes sense to me (not putting anyone down by any means) but I find it would be safer to go that way but curious to hear what others have to say.

Purebred Friesians:
Drool...I ADORE black horses, so stunning.

I would love to sit this horse's canter:



Friesian Crosses:



     
    02-11-2009, 05:56 PM
  #3
Showing
Just found this, thought it was pretty funny and had to post it, a western pleasure/friesian class

     
    02-11-2009, 05:59 PM
  #4
Trained
Oooh, I love that last cross. I'm not going to be of any help but I'm wondering the same thing you are. I've never ridden a friesian myself so I'm interested to hear what people have to say other than they're pretty
     
    02-11-2009, 06:05 PM
  #5
Yearling
I have a friesian cross, so I couldn't tell you really about the full-breds. I have heard that the full bred friesians are very people-oriented and gentle, though like any breed, some will be hot. ;) I have a feeling most aren't.

There are many Friesian cross registries, so these horses (if well bred) still have papers and are recognized by the USDF and USEF. Beware with crosses--if a BYB gets a hold of a cross or a unfortunate friesian, this is where the really poor, awkward looking crosses come in (Poorly conformed mare with an even poorer stud... If a Friesian is bred with a stock horse (paint, QH), DO NOT BUY, lol! The stock breeds normally do not cross well at all)! With crosses, resale is all over the board--if the horse has quality parents and a good show record, they can command a price the same as a full, or more.
I have a cross colt now, and he is one of the nicest-tempered babies I've had the chance to work with. Level-headed, people friendly, but still sensitive enough so that he's not 'dull'.
The problem with riding fulls' is that they were never intended to jump/gallop etc.--these are your typical carriage horses, not riding ones! They were made to trot, which is why a lot of full bloods have weak hocks and croups. (See all the hock action in some of these horses? German's call these kind of horses 'leg movers'. Which is BAD, because you want a 'back mover'! The leg action does not actually do anything for collection, it's just pretty.) There are a few full-blooded lines out there that have a more 'modern' sport horse look, but if someone is looking to jump then a full is usually out of the question (I say usually... you'll probably pay a PRETTY penny to get a full that jumps well!). With the influence of warmbloods on the breed, they are begining to build horses that can jump and gallop well. The older more baroque fulls do okay in dressage, but despite their kind natures it usually takes a talented trainer to bring out the best in them, for they are often downhill and like previously mentioned, they're (comparitively) weaker hind ends take a while to truly condition well.

Heights and Weights REALLY vary, depending on what 'model' you get, lol! The Sport horses tend to be above 16 hands and a little thinner, but the baroque horses can be anywhere from 15.2-17 hands and have a LOT of substance to them.

Hope this helped!
     
    02-11-2009, 06:19 PM
  #6
Showing
Fantastic response, thank you for taking the time to type this up. That answer a lot of my questions and more. How did you find your guy? How did you know what kind of cross was a good cross?
     
    02-11-2009, 06:28 PM
  #7
Yearling
My little tyke is from Florida, by a fantastic breeder who is listed on the Friesian cross Website. I found him through a warmbloods-for-sale? I think, can't remember! Lol

Good crosses result, usually, in good conformation. I was lucky enough to see pictures of my boy when he was first born to get a decent idea of his conformation when full-grown. Warmbloods cross very nicely in my opinion. A lot of breeders are breeding a 'georgian grand', which is a FriesianXsaddlebred cross, but to me their necks look really... giraffe-like. They have 'warlanders'--friesiansxandulsians, but they occasionally come out too thick (but some are REALLY PRETTY! WANT! Lol), and your typical FriesianXTB, which is a good general sport horse.

Good crosses are usually just a result of good parents. If they have show records/good conformation, good chance is you'll get a good baby! If they are unknown, or have 'good bloodlines' but they've never done anything other then eat, don't buy a baby. ;) The parents have to have the same conformation in a way... this is why FriesianXstock horse crosses look so terrible. Friesians are built with high-set necks and somewhat long backs... and stock horses are built with low necks for pleasure/cow work and Long backs... so you get a really awkward necked, LONG backed baby with no gaits conductive to sport work! Lol

Let me dig up some pictures of my colt so you can take a look at him. :)
     
    02-11-2009, 06:31 PM
  #8
Yearling
(I have a huge inability to post pictures on the site, so here are the links. ^^ )
Baby:
Picasa Web Albums - Kelly - Baltic

Current:

Picasa Web Albums - Kelly - Baltic

We've got a lot of growing to do, but he's a great little guy. ;)
     
    02-11-2009, 06:40 PM
  #9
Showing
What a stunning photo of him as a baby. That's fantastic! Would you ever consider a full bred friesian as your next horse? What did you find were the advantages of buying a cross? How old is he now?
     
    02-11-2009, 07:01 PM
  #10
Yearling
He's almost a year now. :) Thanks!

I really want to event with him, so I needed a horse with more stamina and a good, ground covering canter/gallop. Fulls are not known for these attributes, as they have a more 'up' and almost wasteful canter (when it comes to long distances and jumping), a pretty poor jump seeing as they're body isn't always made to do it (I've seen a few with really nice ones, though... :) ). His father, a German warmblood (who does the 'eventing' whilst pulling the carts, lol), has a fantastic jump, good bloodlines/personality, and for me, the advantage in eventing for a cross is much much higher. Fulls just seem too heavy, and too much knee-action, to be good for long distances. (I do know of a few full drafts who event/jump... but their stride is long rather then UP!)

With that being said, if I ever wanted to do straight dressage (which I wouldn't mind either ^^), I would have no problem with choosing a full. I would be very picky, however, to make sure they didn't have a TON of hock action or a weak croup. They are out there, but they're not hugely common.

I really love the look, but wanted something a little more 'sporty', so I went with the cross. ;) My colt will get feathering, his tail is already wavey, and his mane will come in quite long. They tend to keep all of the 'pretty frieisan' aspects, just in a sport-horse package. I really like the black ones, however I DID see a buckskin mare cross who was absolutely gorgeous--same friesian attributes in a different color. :) I would definitely by a pinto friesian cross (without stock horse blood) in a heart beat, as well!
     

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