gypsy horse? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum

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post #21 of 29 Old 02-02-2013, 07:17 PM
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I'm not saying anything bad about them, in fact I've said that I like them. Would I own one? Probably not, they don't suit my needs. I just don't understand the need for ridiculous prices. Like I said on dreamhorse the first few pages the absolute cheapest was $4,500. I know people like what they like, but again I just don't understand the reasoning behind the prices.
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post #22 of 29 Old 02-02-2013, 07:24 PM
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Forgot to add, that a couple of months ago, I was looking at a Mini stallion I liked. He is a pretty buckskin tobiano, with a nice pedigree. He has produced some nice offspring. However, his $12,000 price tag, is more than we could afford or be willing to pay. I looked at another, who was a bay roan stallion. Gorgeous, but way more than I could afford. Minis are two-a-penny now, with thousands being sold for nothing, given away or ending up in auctions. Very sad for the breed. When was the last time you saw a Gypsy in a public auction or rescue. I know of less than a handful which had to be rehomed and only one which was at an auction in Florida. And this with Gypsies having been in the US now, since the 1980's.

Incidentally, the Gypsy seen in the Florida auction, was bred and sold originally, by a fairly famous trainer, who breeds and shows several other breeds. He also breeds designer dogs. Too bad that he would not agree to get this horse back and rehome it.

Forgot to add, we also have Minis, an Arab and a palomino Paint mare, which my granddaughters own.

Lizzie

Last edited by FeatheredFeet; 02-02-2013 at 07:28 PM.
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post #23 of 29 Old 02-03-2013, 10:23 AM
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my bad guys I misread the story


In 1968, the top auction price for a top-quality Arabian was $25,000. In 1970, the average price was $30,000 and by 1985, the average price would jump to $478,000, and in between, numerous breeders tried to hitch their wagon to this shooting star.

Arabian Market

Here's the reasoning for the prices - basic marketing/business

First, supply and demand. This was a 'new' breed so there weren't very many and you could charge what you wanted. People saw them liked them and purchased them for the asking price.

Then from there it really comes down to what someone's willing to pay. Obviously there are people in the USA not willing to pay what you all describe as a 5 figure sums for the average aqha un/barely started and unproven yet, there is/was a demand for gypsy horses and there is/was someone willing to pay the asking prices. If there wasn't someone willing to pay the asking price they wouldn't be able to charge it.

life has no remote control hitch them up and drive them your self

Last edited by Ashleysmardigrasgirl; 02-03-2013 at 10:32 AM.
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post #24 of 29 Old 02-03-2013, 02:47 PM Thread Starter
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So if they are not using the vanner registry are they registered as gypsy horses or gypsy cobs? Is there any resistance by the traveler/romani community who often finds the term gypsy to be a derogatory term? When you did import how did you research the horses? I just feel that when importing a horse (no matter the breed) you can easily get shafted because you could be seen as the wealthy american with more money then brain.

I am sorry for starting this thread where people would feel that their breed was being bashed. I own standardbreds and I hate it when people bash my breed, so I am sorry.

I think price is all about what you feel the horse is worth. "A horse is only worth what someone will pay for it". If someone wants to pay 20,000 dollars than that horse will be worth 20,000 dollars. Its not my place to say a horse is or is not worth x amount. I know a whole bunch of well bred and well trained mini's that sell for thousands. It not my place to say that people are over or underpaying. If you like your horse then you probably don't feel that you paid to much for it.
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post #25 of 29 Old 02-03-2013, 03:12 PM
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If theyre not a registered gypsy vanner theyre considered a gypsy cob or gypsy horse, generally speaking of course. Hopefully featheredfeet can answer your other question since she's much more educated in personal experience with the gypsy/romany people. Im quite certain featheredfeet has stated that she often went to the uk and spoke with the people breeding these horses and personally chose her breeding stock. Please correct me if im wrong. Anyone can be had especially when purchasing a horse sight unseen so its kind of a mute point imo. Anyone in their right mind would do their homework first, imo, of course. I couldnt agree more with your last statement, until someone not willing to pay the price then that's when something has got to give same with everything not just horses.

I personally just plain love horses

life has no remote control hitch them up and drive them your self
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post #26 of 29 Old 02-03-2013, 03:28 PM
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So if they are not using the vanner registry are they registered as gypsy horses or gypsy cobs? Is there any resistance by the traveler/romani community who often finds the term gypsy to be a derogatory term? When you did import how did you research the horses? I just feel that when importing a horse (no matter the breed) you can easily get shafted because you could be seen as the wealthy american with more money then brain.

We have several registries. I wish we had less. However, some register in all and others only in the registry of their choice. In the early days of the breed in the US, the person who started the vanner registry and many of his cronies, put about that vanners were somehow better than those registered in other registries. Ridiculous of course, since many full siblings/sires/dams, were registered in other registries. Luckily, his many ridiculous statements, have now almost disappeared.

The Gypsy breeders in the UK, are not at all upset by the 'Gypsy' name. Maybe more would be upset by the 'Tinker' name, used for the breed in most European countries.

When importing, I think it is important to always do a lot of homework. Visit the seller and see their horses, when at all possible. In fact visit all the breeders of quality horses. That, or go with someone who can introduce you to those who have a good history in the breed. If you cannot visit, see horses and talk to people here who have imported. Find out how the deal went and if they were happy. Remember, whatever the original cost, you can add a huge amount of money for importing and quarantine fees. Then there is transportation from the quarantine station to your home. If a stallion refuses to breed and settle a mare while in quarantine (which they are required to do) then if he must stay for a long time, fees add up quickly.

Lizzie
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post #27 of 29 Old 02-03-2013, 06:14 PM Thread Starter
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Lizzie that's really interesting. I was sort of confused by all the registries. I went to equine affaire and there were like three breed booths and I was like why?

Can you explain the negative connotation behind the "tinker" name is it just a something associated with the way of life that was the travelers?
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post #28 of 29 Old 02-03-2013, 06:36 PM
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Can you explain the negative connotation behind the "tinker" name is it just a something associated with the way of life that was the travelers?

Exactly. Generations ago, Gypsies and Irish Travellers, would go around repairing tin pots and pans. That is how they became known as Tinkers.

I remember when Gypsies delivered out green vegetables, in a cart each week. That was when I saw my first Gypsy Horse. I also remember a Gypsy fellow in Wales, who would come around to my grandmother's house and others, to sharpen our knives. He pushed a large peddle, grinding wheel, from which he would on the road outside.

Lizzie
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post #29 of 29 Old 02-05-2013, 11:27 AM
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We purchased our first Gypsy in 2003. I chose to register that mare, along with all of our subsequent Gypsies, with the Gypsy Vanner Horse Society. I wanted to show and, at the time, the GVHS was the only registry with a show schedule.
There are several registries, and I wish there were fewer. There are differences between them (for example some register cross breds, some don't) but many of the horses are duel or triple registered. Although my horses are registered with the GVHS, I have never led anyone to believe that my horses are different than those registered in other Gypsy registries. I have represented the GVHS in breed booths and shows and explained the lack of difference in public as well.
In my opinion, it is unfortunate that developing an organization and then gathering a support base through the use of technology is extremely easy in today's world. Facts spread quickly, but misinformation seems to whiz around the world at warp speed. So hard to separate truth from untruth.
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