Hanoverian/Thoroughbred
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeds

Hanoverian/Thoroughbred

This is a discussion on Hanoverian/Thoroughbred within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Hanovarian-tb cross
  • What is a thoroughbred oldenburg cross called

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    09-03-2008, 04:26 PM
  #1
Yearling
Hanoverian/Thoroughbred

Has anyone seen this cross? What are your opinions on this cross? Specifically for hunter/jumper purposes?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    09-03-2008, 07:16 PM
  #2
Showing
I've seen them (well one of my friends has one actually) & she does jumping- I think that's a fabulous cross.
     
    09-03-2008, 11:38 PM
  #3
Yearling
I've seen a lot, they are actually pretty common around here and I think they cross wonderfully (if the correct horses are chosen)

http://www.hanoverian.org/mares/TBmares.shtml

http://www.flixya.com/video/613411/W...hbred_for_sale
(Here is one doing hunter/jumper)
     
    09-04-2008, 02:22 PM
  #4
Foal
I'd have to agree, this cross also makes for great jumpers!
     
    09-11-2008, 11:00 PM
  #5
Weanling
I had one :)
He was lovely, although too small for me.
He had natural talent for jumping and more importantly, had a fantastic mind undersaddle.



And this was baby's first jump (which, considering it was his first time ever seeing a jump, isn't bad position! LOL)


He was sold, and is now being ridden in dressage and hunter jumpers :)

Just like any cross, it depends on the breeding and what you want the foal to inherit from its parents.
     
    09-14-2008, 01:48 AM
  #6
Yearling
What a cute guy...how big was he... I thought that cross would generally be quite large?

This brings up another question...is an Oldenberg the result of crossing approved TBs and Hanovarians? OR is an Oldenberg and actual breed? What about a Hanovarian...is it an actual breed? What is the difference between Dutch, Swedish, and other warmbloods?

I am really most familiar with paints and QHs, so these breeds still make little sense to me. :) Any expert knowledge on the subject would be appreciated. :)

Also, What exactly is the 100 day test? How do these various horses get "approved" for breeding? How are TBs approved for breeding with Hanovarians or Oldenbergs?

Sorry for all the Q's...just very curious. :)
     
    09-14-2008, 08:08 AM
  #7
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by AKPaintLover
What a cute guy...how big was he... I thought that cross would generally be quite large?

This brings up another question...is an Oldenberg the result of crossing approved TBs and Hanovarians? OR is an Oldenberg and actual breed? What about a Hanovarian...is it an actual breed? What is the difference between Dutch, Swedish, and other warmbloods?

I am really most familiar with paints and QHs, so these breeds still make little sense to me. :) Any expert knowledge on the subject would be appreciated. :)

Also, What exactly is the 100 day test? How do these various horses get "approved" for breeding? How are TBs approved for breeding with Hanovarians or Oldenbergs?

Sorry for all the Q's...just very curious. :)
You have a ton of questions there girl and I will see what I can do.

Oldenberg

Is a TYPE of Warmblood. No WB is a breed as such but more a type. The various names are derived from the regions in Germany such as Hanover, Westphalia, Bavaria etc. The breeding of "approved" stallions to mares in that German district is what created the various "types" as it is the mare base that is a little different from district to district. Dutch are again an area that have created their own "type" based on their mare base and approval criteria. The hardest idea that most people have trouble getting their mind around is that a mating between the same stallion and mare producing 3 foals can produce 3 foals ending up in 3 different registries. In Germany it is WHERE the foal is born that determined the type it was. For example a Hanovarian bred to a Bavarian can produce a Westphalian if that foal was born in Westphalia. Also if the mare/stallion has breeding approval in more than one registry it will be able to produce foals in registries not normally expected from that sire.

Sounds clear as mud...right?

Also, What exactly is the 100 day test?

All stallions in order to have full breeding approval must do the 30 or 100 day test. It tests the soundness,ridability,conformation and other factors in each potential stallion and rates each one. Usually the score received is the score for life and you as a mare owner can see the results and make potential breeding decisions from that score and your own eyes.

How are TBs approved for breeding with Hanovarians or Oldenbergs?

Rarely are TB stallions aproved but it is possible. Mostly it is mares and only fully registered ( JC) are acceptable for Hanovarian approval. I believe ( I don't know the Oldenberg registry as well) TB mares can be accepted into a lower Oldenberg book if papers are not available but someone will have to post and update me on this. ALL TBs MUST go through an inspection process and are rated and placed in various "books" to determine their breeding acceptance. A lower book means lesser choices in the future. The Hanovarian inspection is the toughest registry to get into.

How do these various horses get "approved" for breeding?

Each registry sets out its own approval regulations and here your best bet is to look at each registry's guidlines. I feel of all the registries, the Hanovarian is the toughest with various degrees of difficulty over the others.
     
    09-14-2008, 02:52 PM
  #8
Weanling
Spyder answered quite a few of your questions, but I'll see what I can do as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AKPaintLover
What a cute guy...how big was he... I thought that cross would generally be quite large?
Hah, well, he should have been. Dad was 17.1hh, mom was 16.1hh. He finished off at 15.2hh (and I doubt that at 4.5 years, he'd grow much more). Don't know why, as all his half siblings were well over 16.2hh. Like any breeding, its a crapshoot. Just because they "should" be tall, doesn't mean they will, much to my dissapointment.

Quote:
This brings up another question...is an Oldenberg the result of crossing approved TBs and Hanovarians? OR is an Oldenberg and actual breed? What about a Hanovarian...is it an actual breed? What is the difference between Dutch, Swedish, and other warmbloods?

How do these various horses get "approved" for breeding? How are TBs approved for breeding with Hanovarians or Oldenbergs?
First of all, people all over try to make sense of the warmblood registries. Its better to accept that its just royally confusing :P
As Spyder said, they are TYPES of warmbloods, depending on where they orginitated. Trakenhers from Trakehn, Holsteiners from Holstein, Oldenburgs from Oldenburg, you get the idea ;) Stallions and mares alike can get approved with different registries depending on what criteria the registry has (its why you see TB mares that can get approved holsteiner or oldenburg or whatever, because the breed likes to allow lighter mares in to give the breed more athletic tendencies) and the resulting foals can be registered with one or several of the registries of their parents
(for example, my guy is pure Holsteiner. His dad was approved holsteiner as well as with the Oldenburg Verband. His dam was approved with the Canadian Warmblood society as well as the North American Oldenburg Society (different from the Verband :P) So, I ran into a little problem here. His sire and dam were not approved with the same registries, so I had two options. I could have him registered with with his sire's registries and accept a Certificate of Pedigree (they ask for a DNA typing to verify that the sire is actually the sire), or I could take the dam to an inspection, hopefully have her approved and then have my guy rated and approved fully into the registry. That's what I did. Took the dam to the Oldenburg Verband, had her approved, had my colt inspected, and he was fully registered. But, here's the kicker. He IS a holsteiner, but because of his approval with the Oldenburg Verband, his "breed" on his papers and his passport became listed as Oldenburg, Confused? :)

Quote:
How do these various horses get "approved" for breeding?
Depends on the registry. Some registries are quite hard to get into...I find that the American/Canadian registries tend to have less regulations/qualifications then those that still remain controlled by Germany (such as the Hanoverian, Trakehner or Oldenburg verband) In North America, stallions aren't required to complete the 100 day or 30 day tests to be approved by their registry (which I think is too bad) and you see a LOT more influx of TBs then you would see in Europe.
     
    09-15-2008, 02:45 AM
  #9
Yearling
That was all very interesting and quite confusing. :) I am not sure it is fully clear to me, but I know more now than I did before...thanks to both of you.
     
    09-16-2008, 12:53 AM
  #10
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyhuntress
I had one :)
He was lovely, although too small for me.
He had natural talent for jumping and more importantly, had a fantastic mind undersaddle.



And this was baby's first jump (which, considering it was his first time ever seeing a jump, isn't bad position! LOL)


He was sold, and is now being ridden in dressage and hunter jumpers :)

Just like any cross, it depends on the breeding and what you want the foal to inherit from its parents.
It makes my heart break in half every time I see pictures of him
Really miss him skyhuntress...
     

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:13 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0