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The height of Mustangs.

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  • Height for a mustang foal
  • Mustang foal height

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    10-04-2011, 11:29 PM
  #21
Weanling
My Mustang mare is on the shorter sign at 14.3 hands tall and 21 years old.
     
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    10-05-2011, 01:19 AM
  #22
Showing
Mestano, just so you know, it won't be a good idea to try to break into the breeding world until the horse market is stabilized and a whole lot better than it is right now. As it is, unless you have the funds to buy crackerjack breeding stock that have been winning championships everywhere they go, it's virtually impossible to make any kind of profit breeding horses, no matter the breed. Shoot, in my area, you can get foals out of semi-successful show parents for $200-$500. Considering that it probably cost the breeder anywhere from $1000 to $5000 just to get the foal to weaning age (stud fee, extra vet care and added feed during pregnancy, plus the added price of farrier care and vaccinations for the additional 3-5 months until the foal is weaned and ready to be re-homed, and that's if nothing goes wrong that requires serious vet care or surgeries).

Any person who claims themselves a "breeder" and doesn't incur those expenses isn't really someone that I would buy from because that means that the foal/dam received sub-par care during and after the pregnancy. It also means that there is that much more expense and time for me to dish into the colt before he's worth what I paid for him.
Tabbi Kat and Day Mares like this.
     
    10-05-2011, 01:26 AM
  #23
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
Mestano, just so you know, it won't be a good idea to try to break into the breeding world until the horse market is stabilized and a whole lot better than it is right now. As it is, unless you have the funds to buy crackerjack breeding stock that have been winning championships everywhere they go, it's virtually impossible to make any kind of profit breeding horses, no matter the breed. Shoot, in my area, you can get foals out of semi-successful show parents for $200-$500. Considering that it probably cost the breeder anywhere from $1000 to $5000 just to get the foal to weaning age (stud fee, extra vet care and added feed during pregnancy, plus the added price of farrier care and vaccinations for the additional 3-5 months until the foal is weaned and ready to be re-homed, and that's if nothing goes wrong that requires serious vet care or surgeries).

Any person who claims themselves a "breeder" and doesn't incur those expenses isn't really someone that I would buy from because that means that the foal/dam received sub-par care during and after the pregnancy. It also means that there is that much more expense and time for me to dish into the colt before he's worth what I paid for him.
I completely agree with Smrobs!
     
    10-05-2011, 06:07 AM
  #24
Foal
Wow. Mustangs really do come in all shapes and sizes and colours don't they?
     
    10-05-2011, 08:28 AM
  #25
Foal
A friend of mine has a mustang gelding that grew up to the time he turned 6. He had a random growth spurt as a 5 yr old which plateaued around 6. Not only did he grow UP (he's about 16 hands) he grew OUT. He's as wide as a tank. On the other hand, this same friend has about 3 other mustangs. Two are over 6 yrs old and only about 14.2. One is a 2 yr old and already surpassed 15 hands.

Mustangs are ... like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're going to get!
Tabbi Kat likes this.
     
    10-05-2011, 10:53 AM
  #26
Trained
Thanks Tabbi Kat!!!! Loved looking at those pictures! Felt like I was there!
I'd never adopt one, not experienced enough to train a completely feral horse,
But I've seen them in the wild and would love to go to a BLM adoption just to
Look! The grey arab looking mare and your bay are spectacular!

Mestano, check out SBHA. If you have a dream you could get involved and do
Some research on Spanish Barbs. There are only 2,000 pure breds in the US.
A massive breeding program/herd is NOT responsible these days, but
Having a passion for a particular breed that is endangered and supporting them
By purchasing/showing and then one day possibly breeding a couple excellent foals to propagate the breed isn't an alltogether bad idea!
Most people here don't know about each others backgrounds with horses, their
Experience, or capabilities. So don't let the dream die, but just make sure it's
A well thought out one!
     
    10-05-2011, 11:45 AM
  #27
Yearling
Every mustang is different. Here's my current 'stang. I've owned 8 over my lifetime and each one was vastly different, but the traits I love about them are why I keep coming back to them.

1. Strong survival skills. I live in a predator rich area.

2. Easy keeping. Yes, my mustangs dine on good feed, but they love burdocks, thistles, and other pasture weeds. They keep the pasture clean so the pansy QH's will eat the grass.

3. Genetically healthy. They are darned healthy.

4. Hooves. USUALLY are very tight, hard, flinty hooves that crush rocks.

5. Surefootedness- I ride on rough trail- I don't want my horse to slip.

6. The "Bond". Yes, I do believe that when you take an animal from the wild and tame it, it forms a bond with you. Nothing is more evident than with a mustang.
Tabbi Kat likes this.
     
    10-05-2011, 11:48 AM
  #28
Yearling
Well crud, pic didn't work to edit it. Here it is.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 103_0181.jpg (95.2 KB, 38 views)
Tabbi Kat likes this.
     
    10-05-2011, 11:52 AM
  #29
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by draftrider    
Every mustang is different. Here's my current 'stang. I've owned 8 over my lifetime and each one was vastly different, but the traits I love about them are why I keep coming back to them.

1. Strong survival skills. I live in a predator rich area.

2. Easy keeping. Yes, my mustangs dine on good feed, but they love burdocks, thistles, and other pasture weeds. They keep the pasture clean so the pansy QH's will eat the grass.

3. Genetically healthy. They are darned healthy.

4. Hooves. USUALLY are very tight, hard, flinty hooves that crush rocks.

5. Surefootedness- I ride on rough trail- I don't want my horse to slip.

6. The "Bond". Yes, I do believe that when you take an animal from the wild and tame it, it forms a bond with you. Nothing is more evident than with a mustang.

Hey, those are the reasons that I own BLM mustangs! The bond you form with a wild horse is like none other that I have experienced! They are amazing horses!
     
    10-05-2011, 11:53 AM
  #30
Super Moderator
Gorgeous 'stang draftrider!
     

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