How do you pick the right breed of horse? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 35 Old 02-19-2011, 12:29 PM
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i agree with MIEventer here.

every horse is different, though there are some breeds that are known for being more mellow than others, but like with dogs, horses also have individuals that are exceptions.

overall also like dogs people will tell you that mutts are the best (grade horses) because they tend to be the most easy going sure footed laid back ones out there. again it varies by horse.

as for getting more than one horse - if you are a first time owner be aware it IS more time and work, however if you plan on keeping on your property most horses are happier with a companion. it's certainly doable and two is better if they will be alone.

good luck!

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post #12 of 35 Old 02-19-2011, 12:30 PM
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good advice by all :)
glad you have people to help AND that you are getting more hands on experience first! enjoy!!!!

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post #13 of 35 Old 02-19-2011, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by pawzaddict View Post
Yes you are correct, the list of attributes is more of a "well this breed tends to have these attributes" and then its finding an individual of that breed or a similar breed that matches what you want.
I am biased, of course, but if you'll be looking for a good, all around horse for pleasure riding, the stock breeds (Paint/QH/Appy) are generally very stable, smart, willing horses with good dispositions that can do just about anything. They also tend to be low maintenance, easy keepers (which saves you a bunch of $$s).

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I am interested for sure on getting an adult horse that is pretty much already trained and broke (is that the word?) unless its easy to do so.
An old, wise, horse person once told me that horses don't get brains until they are 10 years old We've bought a couple great 3 year old 'greenies' that you could put children on without a problem, but you can't beat our finished, seasoned, penning lead mare (who is now 16 years old) for being able to do anything and go anywhere without ever fussing.

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I know this may be a dumb question, but when you go to purchase a horse do you get to ride the horse? I think thats one of my biggest things, is being comfy on the horse.
Yes, and insist on riding at least a few times. I always tell folks to make sure they try the horse in the same environment that you plan to ride. Horses all act different in the arena, on the trail, in a group, and out alone. You can never be 100% sure, but walk away from any seller that doesn't give you the opportunity to feel comfortable about your decision no matter how much you like the horse.

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post #14 of 35 Old 02-19-2011, 12:40 PM Thread Starter
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What they don't tell you is how highly unusual it is to find a horse of this breed that has the temperament to do these disciplines.
I will definitely keep that in mind. :)

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Just like with dogs, these horses are usually best for people with some experience.
I definitely think I want a chill horse to start with, something older.

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A few high-energy breeds (in general of course) are Arabs, Saddlebreds, Thoroughbreds, Morgans. Some breeds that are known for being more mellow and laid back are Quarter Horses, Paints, and other stock horse breeds.
Good to know. We had a retired Thoroughbred who was pretty relaxed but he was old and had some injury to a leg to where he couldn't run? I can't quite remember tbh.
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overall also like dogs people will tell you that mutts are the best (grade horses) because they tend to be the most easy going sure footed laid back ones out there. again it varies by horse.
Grade horses are the mutts in the horse world? lol I would definitely not mind one :)

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as for getting more than one horse - if you are a first time owner be aware it IS more time and work, however if you plan on keeping on your property most horses are happier with a companion. it's certainly doable and two is better if they will be alone.
yea it definitely depends on where I am in the future career wise. I am hoping to run a boarding facility/rescue on my property but that is some wishful thinking! If I am going to be gone 8-9 hours a day then I will get a companion and most likely hire a helper.

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Originally Posted by CJ82Sky View Post
good advice by all :)
glad you have people to help AND that you are getting more hands on experience first! enjoy!!!!
I expect the same from new dog owners ya know what I mean? Get experience somewhere first, get an adult first instead of purchasing a puppy when you have no idea what to do, etc. Thanks to everyone for being so awesome
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post #15 of 35 Old 02-19-2011, 12:44 PM Thread Starter
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eep! Sorry I want to make sure I get to everyones responses :)

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I am biased, of course, but if you'll be looking for a good, all around horse for pleasure riding, the stock breeds (Paint/QH/Appy) are generally very stable, smart, willing horses with good dispositions that can do just about anything. They also tend to be low maintenance, easy keepers (which saves you a bunch of $$s).
We had a gorgeous QH when I was young, he was amazing with us kids.

Quote:
An old, wise, horse person once told me that horses don't get brains until they are 10 years old We've bought a couple great 3 year old 'greenies' that you could put children on without a problem, but you can't beat our finished, seasoned, penning lead mare (who is now 16 years old) for being able to do anything and go anywhere without ever fussing.
Ooooooh ok good to know! Is it hard to find older horses or is it easy much like in the dog world?

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but walk away from any seller that doesn't give you the opportunity to feel comfortable about your decision no matter how much you like the horse.
I will absolutely keep this in mind. I like the idea of testing out a horse for a week to make sure it does well at home :)
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post #16 of 35 Old 02-19-2011, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by pawzaddict View Post
Ooooooh ok good to know! Is it hard to find older horses or is it easy much like in the dog world?
'Older' (over 10) horses are easy to find in general, but finding those very calm, go anywhere, ones is not...or folks want a premium price for them. Most of my over 40 friends (I'm 56) that have had enough bumps, bruises, falls, and broken bones living through having young and/or 'crazy' horses start looking for that older, 'reliable' horse at some point. They all find that most folks that own these horses do not want to part with them....they're just to valuable as reliable mounts (even though their dollar value may not be that much). You just need to be patient while looking and having a little bit of luck doesn't hurt.

On the sixth day, God created the Quarter Horse.
On the seventh day, he Painted the good ones.
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post #17 of 35 Old 02-19-2011, 01:06 PM Thread Starter
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Makes sense! ty
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post #18 of 35 Old 02-19-2011, 01:49 PM
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Well as a fellow dog person I can see how you would relate that. But really, just like dogs, each horse has there own personality. But most horses aren't as drastically different like dogs are. There is such a wide variety of dogs that look nothing like another dog from a different breed. Some dogs you can mistake for different species all together. Horses aren't that way, except in somewhat extreme cases. You never see a horse and think it looks like a gazelle or something like that. xD Like if you saw a certain dog you might mistake it for a rabbit.

I would just suggest to look for horses that are what you want, not a specific breed. If you are looking for a horse that is just going to be a pleasure riding horse as a hobby, then find some sort of mix that is already broke. Just look for a horse that is easy to look at and has a good personality plus is trained to what you are planning to do with it. If you want a trail riding horse don't get a high strong greenbroke arabian, but lean more towards a laid back Quarter horse that is broke and listens well. While the arab might be gorgeous, you would want to go with the more subtle Quarter horse if you are going on a trail. But of course it depends on the horse. I've seen Arabs that are just the sweetest thing (more often then not if they've had good training), and Quarter horses that have a bit more spunk (as a result of bad training or breeding, usually).

So pretty much find a personality you want and go for it. While spunky horses might be quite, the are a pain in the rump to try and break. And for a beginner horse you do NOT want to be breaking your own horse! (I know this from experience, my first horse that my parents got me wasn't broke. He's much better now, but don't make a dumb choice like that. xD)

As for getting one or two horses, I'd suggest just one if you want to be very close to your horse. I started off with just my gelding and we were as the best of friends, and when we got our second horse he pretty much forgot about me. A pasture mate isn't really a requirement if you can give them the time they need. If you do get a buddy for your horse, make sure to separate them and make sure they don't get too attached. Keep 'em in different pastures from time to time, and give love to the both of them.

But please, just look at every horse. Don't stick to breeds with the false sense that one is better than another. It's really training and personality. I would pick my green gelding over my trail mare any day because the gelding listens. The mare is stubborn as heck, but the gelding will do whatever I say because I say so. If I want him to jump over a barrel he will because he knows I'll make him do it. He is trained in Parelli and that's the sort of thing that specific training is. But the mare was just trained like shove a bit in her mouth, get on her back and lets go. (That's what I'm assuming because she acts as if being ridden is a punishment.) If she doesn't listen, lets make her lunge. When she's tired, lets get back on her and go. (That is what my gelding was started to be trained like, but I switched after I fell off multiple times. Haven't landed and broke anything yet, but there is always time for that. xD)

Sorry for the novel, I'm bad at summerizing.
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post #19 of 35 Old 02-19-2011, 06:11 PM
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Originally Posted by gottatrot View Post

if you want a dog to go running with you every day you wouldn't start looking at Bulldogs. And if you wanted a quiet house dog you wouldn't search through ads for Border Collies.
Totally off topic but i just had to laugh when i read this because when i was looking for a dog i wanted to get an English mastiff, want to guess what i ended up getting...a border collie, total complete opposite lol, i did know a lot about the breed, so i didn't go in blind(my mom owns a boarding kennel and i was a vet tech for 4 years before i got pregnant) and i did want to do agility

back in topic, everyone has given great advise , my first 2 horses were arab/quarter horse crosses, and both in their 20's, sadly Tiffany was put down about 7 years ago, but blue is still going strong 13 years later, look at many horses before you decided, you will know when you found the one! after the first few rides you will realize that you just click with that horse. Good luck when you do start looking, also when you go to look at a horse it's a good idea to show up earlier then your expected time so you can watch the horse being tacked up(or tack it up your self) and make sure they don't drug the horse. For a first horse a gelding might be better then a mare, mares can be moody, not all mares, but it's just something to think about when you are looking, geldings are usually more consistent in their temperament, a mare can be great one day, and a total witch the next lol
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post #20 of 35 Old 02-19-2011, 08:49 PM
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Yep, since you know dogs (OP) you can think of a mare like an unspayed female and a gelding like a neutered male. The unspayed female's temperament is a lot different from the neutered male's temperament.
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