How smart do you think your horse is? (honestly) - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 41 Old 02-13-2012, 10:02 AM
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Smarter than me.
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post #12 of 41 Old 02-13-2012, 10:14 AM
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I think there is a range of intelligence, just like people. I've worked with some really smart ones, and some really really dumb ones! I'm not talking stubborn "dumb" I'm talking dumber than a box of rocks!
Having worked with all sorts of animals in my lifetime (so far) from wild, to domestic, to livestock there seems to be a range of intelligence within any given animal species.

As for my current horse, I think he is somewhere above average. Being a prankster takes some smarts and for the most part he really wants you to think he is dumb. That way he can pull a funny on you because you are not expecting it.
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post #13 of 41 Old 02-13-2012, 10:26 AM
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IMO the fact that they have a sense of humor( and they DEFINITELY do!!) is a huge indicator of their intelligence level. I think they can be likened to a child/young teen quite often. They learn exactly what buttons to push and not to push with their people, know how far they can push. I have watched my boy display surprising problem solving abilities, have temper tantrums, apologize( though that's rare, lol Jack has no shame) and obviously be very proud of himself. There are times when I could not be prouder or more amazed at the capabilities of my Jackson, and times when I canNOT believe he acted such a fool(for instance when we fought for 40 min over crossing a teeny tiny rivulet of water that was literally 2 in deep and maybe 5 in across, after which he finally took a flying leap and managed to land in the MIDDLE of the teeny tiny rivulet) I have a younger brother, only 12, and the similarities between the two are astounding,lol. I wouldn't be surprised in the least to catch them both side by side sticking their tongues out at me someday!
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post #14 of 41 Old 02-13-2012, 10:39 AM
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Lola is smart when she wants to be, but that's only like 50% of the time haha.
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post #15 of 41 Old 02-13-2012, 11:16 AM
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My mare is a walking disaster and she needs her very own roll of bubble wrap. Yet, I marvel at her intelligence. Just yesterday, I told her to 'watch her feet' as we were working over raised poles. I didn't expect much to come from that cue and it was meant more as an idle remark in my one-sided conversation with her, but she immediately dropped her head and appeared to 'watch her feet' as she carefully lifted them up and over the poles. I thought it was a fluke, so I gave the command again and she dropped her head to her knees again. Hm, I started thinking, and led her away from any raised pole. In the middle of her pen, I asked her to watch her feet again. She wasn't moving, she knew that and she knew she had no reason to watch her feet... but she dropped her head again. I don't know where she knows that cue from, but it was a surprise to me. She's constantly surprising me with the little things she knows, things that I wouldn't ever think were important on the race track.

Another thing she surprised me with... if I drop her lead to let her graze, she will never step on the line. She'll graze around the lead and when she wants to move to a new spot, she will pick up the line and carry it to the next location. Then she'll drop it, sidestep away and resume grazing. I don't know where she learned this habit, but it amazed me.
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post #16 of 41 Old 02-13-2012, 04:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Courtney View Post

Another thing she surprised me with... if I drop her lead to let her graze, she will never step on the line. She'll graze around the lead and when she wants to move to a new spot, she will pick up the line and carry it to the next location. Then she'll drop it, sidestep away and resume grazing. I don't know where she learned this habit, but it amazed me.
That is fascinating! I think I will go and test my mare to see what she does with a dropped lead rope.
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post #17 of 41 Old 02-13-2012, 04:04 PM
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Dobe and Denny are both too smart for their own good. Jesse, on the other hand, is about as good natured as he can be, but he's a bit of a goofy dumb-butt. There are times I can almost hear him say "Herp, derp, duuuuhhhh"

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post #18 of 41 Old 02-13-2012, 04:17 PM
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My horse is very smart but he's very stubborn at times.. he's my match. We once were going over lowering the head with pressure release... I kid you not, I prompted with as much pressure as he was bracing, kept it on.. for over 30 minutes, and he finally gave a little and I gave too.

Now I just ask with the lightest touch and he obliges.

But man!

Other times, he just appears "dumb" to get out of doing things (how smart is he?!,) usually with other people.

He picks up a new cue so quickly it makes my head spin.

He's definitely met his match though.. and I the same!

"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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post #19 of 41 Old 02-13-2012, 04:28 PM
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I asked "Ciri" ( the smart phone Knowledge Goddess) which is smarter, a horse or a dog, and SHE said, referecing some internet sites, that horses are more intelligent than dogs. H m m m. Are they?
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post #20 of 41 Old 02-13-2012, 04:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Courtney View Post
M
Another thing she surprised me with... if I drop her lead to let her graze, she will never step on the line. She'll graze around the lead and when she wants to move to a new spot, she will pick up the line and carry it to the next location. Then she'll drop it, sidestep away and resume grazing. I don't know where she learned this habit, but it amazed me.
If she were really smart and trained, she would be ground tied with a dangling lead...just funnin' with you a little, but it's true...
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