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How Tall?

This is a discussion on How Tall? within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

     
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        01-06-2008, 10:14 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    Re: How Tall?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by koweta
    This colt is the first baby we have had around. I personaly want to geld him because of the fact that we had no clue on how to work with any foal especialy a colt.
    Also lately he has been trying to 'play' with me as I am trying to work with him. Playing im mean rearing up beside me and trying to bite and run around me. But he seems to only do that once I strart to make him actualy think. Other than him playing with me like im another horse he is realy calm. When im not working with him he dosnt even atempt to bite me or anybody. Any sugestions?
    How old is he now? Young horses are very mouthy, and stallions are even more mouthy. You should not tolerate any amount of this. Height wise from what you say, I would guess you will have a stallion around 16HH. The last thing you want is a gigantic stallion who thinks it is okay to bully you by biting, rearing, etc.

    Stallions also tend to rear, strike, and kick - especially when young and testing the waters. You can nip that in the bud, but you have to really know just what to do and do it at the exactly correct time.

    Discipline for stopping those behaviors is hard to explain without knowing exactly how, when, and what circumstance surround them, SO I would recommend hiring a reputable and experienced trainer to work with you and him on a regular basis or send him somewhere well recommended for his initial training.

    One thing that I will warn against is being too harsh or too soft with him. This is what I think goes wrong with many stallions. People think "stallion" and get really hard and rough on their discipline making a resentful and angry stallion- dangerous. Others think behaviors are cute until one day they realize their full grown stallion is dominating them and very dangerously pushing them about. I have always treated my stallion like a gelding who I expect the highest level of behavior from. I do not let him get away with the little things, but I am not overly harsh to him when he messes up. You do need to always remember that he is a stallion though, and keep others safety in mind when handling him at all times - you can never really drop your guard.

    Remember that there is more into keeping a horse a stud than bloodlines. How is his overall balance? Is he eye catching? Sound? Healthy? How is his movement? How is his temperament? His trainability? When you start showing him, how does he perform? If you post a picture of him in the critiques section, there are some people on here with a really good eye for conformation that might be able to give you an honest critique of him as a stallion prospect.

    Remember you can always geld at the first sign of trouble :) I threatened my stallion in his younger days with it..."if you don't keep your nose in line you will be a gelding" :) Now I have a stallion that most think is a gelding.
         
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        01-07-2008, 11:47 AM
      #12
    Foal
    Thanks He is 9 months now. I will try to get some pictures of him up. He is normaly a very calm colt, its just when he gets bored or upset about what Im making him do he tells me by nipping, stomping, ect... I had my trainer come out and show me what to do when he rears up or trys to nip at me, or whatever he happens to do. He has yet to try to kick at me with him back feet but he tends to stomp his front legs when agrivated. But he has never kicked at me or lunged at me. As for his conformation I will get a picture of him standing in the correct position, also we are getting him tested to see if we do stud him out, if he will give the foal the paint markings. He should have the homozygous dominant gene for paint color hopefully since his mother is homozygous dominant.

    This is him at 5 months, its not a great one seeing as he is laying down and you can't see his marking very well or his conformation...il try to get a differnt picture up later



    This is his mother.
         
        01-07-2008, 03:40 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    His mother is beautiful and he a quite a cutie. I love how he has less white (even if it is on the legs - hard to clean :) ). BUT definitely get a conformation shot up there (or better yet, under the critique thread) and some people on here who are better than me at critiquing conformation can give you some real honest feedback (I only have an eye for obvious confo. Issues and overall balance). There are some on here who are really good with conformation.

    Definitely don't let him keep up with the stomping thing - it can turn into striking. All the young (sort of cute now) behaviors are capable of turning into a more dangerous stallion behavior. When he stomps, immediately give him a firm NO with your voice and back him a couple of steps (only one suggestion, many things can be tried to correct behaviors). Then immediately go back to what you were working on. Your trainer might have some other ideas.
         
        01-07-2008, 03:42 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    Is he overo? If so, be sure to have him tested for the lethal white gene as well before breeding him in the future.
         
        01-07-2008, 04:49 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    If his dam was a homozygous, he'd have to be a tobiano, but he could still carry the lethal white gene. I agree, if you keep him as a stud, I'd test him for that.
    As for the behaviour, everyone is completely right. Nip that in the bud. I do not put up with that kind of behaviour from my colts. I'm not mean and don't beat them, but I teach them right from babies that I do not allow nipping, striking or kicking. Pawing isn't allowed either. Often, all I ever have to do is holler "Hey" at them. It gets their attention and usually stops the bad behaviour. If they continue with the bad behaviour, I will make them do some work. Maybe just leading over the trail bridge, or trotting around the yard, but it generally gets them thinking that it's easier to be good than bad.
         
        02-07-2008, 11:08 AM
      #16
    Foal
    What is the lethal white gene?
    He looks REALLY cute! Good luck with him!
         
        02-07-2008, 01:15 PM
      #17
    Trained
    He is definitely a cutie!

    I agree with what everyone said about nipping his bad behaviors in the bud.

    As for lethal white, here's a website
    http://www.stallingspainthorses.com/lethal-white1.htm
         

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