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Impressive bloodlines

This is a discussion on Impressive bloodlines within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        11-01-2009, 05:41 PM
      #71
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nrhareiner    
    No actually only about 50% of Impressives get would be N/H and the other where N/N
    sorry I forgot that only one mutation would make him N/H. you're right
         
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        11-01-2009, 05:43 PM
      #72
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by farmpony84    
    I think she's saying it's "strange" that it only happened to that one horse in particular... and I see her point, it is wierd that he's the only horse in the world that the genetic mutation happened to... and the funny thing is, had he been just a plain old average horse, he'd have been gelded and no one would ever have known... or if he had merely been a mediocre stud, his breeding would have been so much smaller and the spread not so much... it would have been something people rarely heard of... but since he was one of the great horses of halter, and he was so famous and built so well... and bred so much... HYPP is huge... I can see the use of the word... "strange"...

    Luck of the draw?
    Ok I understand what you mean now. sorry. It is, but I guess since the rate of mutation is so low anyways, and there are so many possible mutations he just got a strange one.
         
        11-01-2009, 07:34 PM
      #73
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by farmpony84    
    ...and the funny thing is, had he been just a plain old average horse, he'd have been gelded and no one would ever have known... or if he had merely been a mediocre stud, his breeding would have been so much smaller and the spread not so much... it would have been something people rarely heard of...
    I think this is a good point. I have to think it's certainly possible that any number of other non Impressive horses have had/have HYPP, and... just like in people, there are certainly many, many other 'bad' genetic mutations lurking around out there.
         
        11-01-2009, 11:21 PM
      #74
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by farmpony84    
    I think she's saying it's "strange" that it only happened to that one horse in particular... and I see her point, it is wierd that he's the only horse in the world that the genetic mutation happened to... and the funny thing is, had he been just a plain old average horse, he'd have been gelded and no one would ever have known... or if he had merely been a mediocre stud, his breeding would have been so much smaller and the spread not so much... it would have been something people rarely heard of... but since he was one of the great horses of halter, and he was so famous and built so well... and bred so much... HYPP is huge... I can see the use of the word... "strange"...

    Luck of the draw?
    Exactly!! It's really crazy... and just a strange thing to have happen! Haha
         
        10-15-2014, 05:17 PM
      #75
    Foal
    Being an owner/breeder myself, I was very fond of Impressive. I owned 3 Impressive bred horses (all bred by me). My first was Shesa Bold Bar a 1993 Palomino by he's Triple Impress (Skip by Impress x Vanbargo) a grandson of Impressive. He was about 15.2 hands and roughly 1400 lbs. Not quite so massive as today's popular stallions and at the time I bred my mare we were just learning about HyPP being named officially and that it could be identified via testing. Naturally I had my mare tested (N/N).
    My next Impressive bred horse, a nephew of my mare. Skip's Triple Dare a 1999 Palomino colt by DoUDare (Hes Triple Impress x Sizzle Raliegh Ann) I had the opportunity to use a friend's mare that I just loved - Miss Thirsty Jaguar (Mr Jaguar x Ima Thristy Angel) - I showed this colt at Halter even after a near fatal accident when he was impaled on T-Post and had the post go through his ribs, shred his lung and collapse it and lose a rib which after he spent 3 months recovering from, pulled through beautifully but the scar was obvious and so was the missing rib - I watched judges gather and debate looking at my colt but in the end he won. Later as a riding horse he was AWESOME, he was so smooth and so easy to train and work with he blew my mind - My mare was my personal favorite, last foal out of my first horse and a treasure. Later I had my colt tested (N/H) and decided at 2 to castrate him. I know many would have kept him a stud and said I was stupid for gelding such a nice colt, but hey - he ended up being an awesome kids horse. I've often said, responsible breeders will self police the industry without AQHA having to do much and for the most part the spread has been less prominent but I think after reading AQHA's stance on HyPP and future registrations that they are on the right track.

    Read all the comments here, Although the vid link to Kids Classic Style is no longer working I have seen him myself in person like 8 years ago and can say he is truly one massive horse - not particularly my slice of pie, I don't like them quite that heavy - I love a more refined performance typed halter horse than just pure looks. (my opinion of course) but, Kids Classic Style does look like he does in pictures and of the vids of him out there on YouTube.

    One question I found didn't quite get answered, which is the reason I am posting on this thread was, why only Impressive? Well, Impressive is not the only individual or species to have HyPP. It has been found in Humans as well, been well documented and I have heard through other sources that there may be a specific line of beef cattle suspected to have this mutation too (though can't say the beef rumor is true) But I do know it's not just Horses. As for heredity of HyPP:
    • H/H, meaning they have the mutation and it is homozygous. These horses always pass on the disease.
    • N/H, meaning they have the mutation and it is heterozygous. These horses are affected to a lesser degree and pass on the disease 50% of the time.
    • N/N, meaning they do not have the mutation and cannot pass it on.
    Disease in humans

    Although much less publicized, hyperkalemic periodic paralysis has been observed in humans. In humans the disorder causes episodes of extreme muscle weakness, with attacks often beginning in infancy. Depending on the type and severity of the HyperKPP, it can increase or stabilize until the fourth or fifth decade where attacks may cease, decline, or, depending on the type, continue on into old age. Factors that can trigger attacks include rest after exercise, potassium-rich foods, stress, fatigue, weather changes, certain pollutants (e.g., cigarette smoke) and fasting. Muscle strength often improves between attacks, although many affected people may have increasing bouts of muscle weakness as the disorder progresses (abortive attacks). Sometimes with HyperKPP those affected may experience degrees of muscle stiffness and spasms (myotonia) in the affected muscles. This can be caused by the same things that trigger the paralysis, dependent on the type of myotonia. (See also paramyotonia).
    Some people with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis have increased levels of potassium in their blood (hyperkalemia) during attacks. In other cases, attacks are associated with normal blood potassium levels (normakalemia). Ingesting potassium can trigger attacks in affected individuals, even if blood potassium levels do not rise in response.


    The above Information I found for quick reference is not my own just posting info that is readily available on the net.
         
        10-15-2014, 05:50 PM
      #76
    Foal
    Interesting thread! I own a mare with Impressive bloodlines. I don't have anything to add but wanted to say thanks because it's an informative thread for sure.
         
        10-15-2014, 07:29 PM
      #77
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DMoon    
    One question I found didn't quite get answered, which is the reason I am posting on this thread was, why only Impressive?
    I think the answer to that is that this particular mutation in Quarter Horses started with Impressive. And because he was so popular, his genetics were spread far and wide.

    Maybe we can't trace it or eliminate it in other species (I have no idea) but with Impressive we actually have that chance. We can keep his bloodlines while also eliminating the defective gene mutation. If we can do that, I think it would be win-win.

    And it would be good for Impressive lovers too, because then his name wouldn't have such a stigma attached. Because let's face it, when most people think "Impressive" they think "HYPP." I know I do. I really know very little about the horse, other than he is associated with HYPP and some breeders are breeding positive horses just because they show well (I guess that's why.....because why else would you purposely carry on a genetic defect?).

    So that's my opinion for whatever it's worth.

    I was actually considering a Paint mare once (for trails) and the fact that she traced back to Impressive was a bit of a turn-off. Although I did find out her sire was N/N, so it wouldn't have been an issue (her dam wasn't Impressive bred). So for a serious breeder maybe his name is a plus, but for joe-bloe horseman, his name has a stigma attached, which is a shame.

    Actually, I feel that way about halter horses in general, because I have this impression (wrong or not?) that they won't hold up to serious riding. I want a horse that stays sound for as long as possible because once I own a horse I tend to keep them. And I would rather feed a sound horse I can ride. :)
         
        10-15-2014, 07:37 PM
      #78
    Yearling
    This is an interesting thread, I just noticed it hadn't been posted in in almost 5 years though..lol
         
        10-15-2014, 07:40 PM
      #79
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gingerscout    
    this is an interesting thread, I just noticed it hadn't been posted in in almost 5 years though..lol
    I noticed that but still felt like responding.
         
        10-15-2014, 07:57 PM
      #80
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
    Actually, I feel that way about halter horses in general, because I have this impression (wrong or not?) that they won't hold up to serious riding. I want a horse that stays sound for as long as possible because once I own a horse I tend to keep them. And I would rather feed a sound horse I can ride. :)
    It is a misconception that every halter horse, especially Impressive line horses, have been bred to have terrible legs and feet. Our riding, Impressive line mare has very good feet, is very sure footed on and off the trail, and has had no health/physical problems after 9 years of road and trail riding. You do have to get used to riding them as she is very big barreled and those legs can really pound the ground at a gallop, but the only "problems" are that you feel like a bowl legged cowboy after you get off from a long ride and you have to watch for enough room for your legs when weaving through the trees or you'll take one on the knee.
         

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