Mustangs. Please help! - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 31 Old 07-11-2008, 01:52 AM
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mustangs are WONDERFUL with barrel racing take it from me i got a mustang a couple years a go she was completely wild and now she can smoke a barrel or pole pattern they are quick learners and they love to run so if you can put the speed to a pattern (which with as good of learners as they are it is easy) you can SMOKE IT! good luck and let me know if you need more advice let me know i have lots of experience and know how they think!

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post #22 of 31 Old 07-12-2008, 08:33 PM
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mustangs for barrel racing or anything else

My daughter, Amy is a professional trainer, ridign instructor, barefoot trimmer and lives in WA state. She has trained mustangs in CA when she lived there. I had horses, trained them showed them so I can speak with some authority to verify her ablity which far exceede my own. She is the most patient, kind, loving trainer I have ever met.
Okay here is her website and address. There are two here for she is moderator of the Wa Equestran something or other.
Just say 'your mom sent me." lOL
Jane
OOPS I forgot to paste her urls
http://aaequestrian.tripod.com
http://www.waequest.com
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post #23 of 31 Old 07-16-2008, 02:00 AM
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Mustangs

I have adopted a couple of mustangs over time. They are smart, attentive, sturdy and easy to keep. Adopting a yearling or younger is easiest to get them trained and attached to you quickly. Mine have been very willing. But for a barrel racer you may need to get some help for body type and bone and angles in conformation to lend it to speed, if you want to win. My gelding was very short and stocky, and not real fast, but had the endurance of a giant, and could clim uphill all day. He might not have been a good canidate for speed, and the sport you are targeting. Go to a BLM adoption center and get some help from a knowledgeable wrangler who can help find theright body type and style to make a bet on his speed.
Laurie
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post #24 of 31 Old 07-19-2008, 08:22 AM
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I say if you are willing, and can handle the training of a mustang then go for it. I think my mare would be great for any speed events. And she has the heart to do it as well. But be careful mustangs aren't like domesticated horses, they have a very different temperament They are NOT push button horses, and are stubborn, and most of the time set in there ways(if that makes any sense.) It takes a bit more persestance and time to get something
stuck in there head. They don't accept much until they really trust you.however they bond well with their owners and once bonded, become very attached to that person. Highly intelligent with an innate sense of self-preservation, they are not prone to put themslves into any situation which may be destructive or dangerous. I hope this helped. And good luck! I know I ramble.
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post #25 of 31 Old 07-19-2008, 09:45 PM
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Do you mean adopt a mustang from the wild or the one thaTS IN THOSE SHELTER THINGS?


*opps! Sorry caps lock was on!*

Rach
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post #26 of 31 Old 07-30-2008, 02:41 PM
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I have 2 mustangs and from my experience, they are more stable and dependable than most domesticated horses. I have experience with TB, QH, and some Draft breeds. There is no doubt that it would make a solid barrel horse. Maybe not the fastest but a very good horse anyway. I have decided that I will never pay money for a quarter horse again when I can get a lot better horse for 1/10 the money.

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post #27 of 31 Old 11-19-2008, 12:52 AM
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Smile

I met who is now my trainer, friend, and web site client, bout 2 years ago - they raise Spanish Mustangs as well as train. When I begin a new web site I study the subject of the site, so began studying Spanish Mustangs, learning what I could. Pretty soon I began to really like them. The more I was around my friend/trainer's horses, the more I liked them. This past June they gave me an older range mare that I had borrowed as a companion for my mare last fall. All winter I kept telling them they could have her back in oh bout 10 years, just absolutely love that old mare. She's a classic with an old soul and wonderful personality. In Oct my appaloosa mare had got too tall and stocky for what I wanted so after much thought and discussion, I traded her for a 2 1/2 yr old grulla appaloosa Spanish Mustang. So now I have 2 SM's and I love them! They are quick, smart, fast learners. That old range mare had me caught within the first 15 mins of her arrival last November. My friends/trainers told me that mustangs pick their people and she had picked me.
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post #28 of 31 Old 11-19-2008, 02:08 AM
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I am definitely drawn to the mustangs. I'd like to adopt one or two sometime in the future. From what I hear, a mustang would be a pretty good horse for me. I definitely love a smart horse that will bond closely with me after learning to trust me... and one that is hardy. Not many mustangs are likely to be prone to chronic colic or other issues either, I'm willing to bet the Darwin system took care of that.

I think with enough time and patience I could go some pretty amazing places with the right mustang, and I bet you can too. ;)

You might consider looking into adopting a mustang that has already been trained to some extent. There are some prison programs where they train the mustangs a little before auctioning them, and other similar deals.
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post #29 of 31 Old 11-19-2008, 02:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plain Jane View Post
My daughter, Amy is a professional trainer, ridign instructor, barefoot trimmer and lives in WA state. She has trained mustangs in CA when she lived there. I had horses, trained them showed them so I can speak with some authority to verify her ablity which far exceede my own. She is the most patient, kind, loving trainer I have ever met.
Okay here is her website and address. There are two here for she is moderator of the Wa Equestran something or other.
Just say 'your mom sent me." lOL
Jane
OOPS I forgot to paste her urls
AA EQUESTRIAN
Washington Equestrian Network
wish it wasn't 3 hours away, or I'de seriously consider having her help me with my 2 yr old :)
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post #30 of 31 Old 11-19-2008, 10:28 AM
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I have a mustang colt, and he is so nimble and agile I am definately using him for reining. He is also more laid back than other horses I have ever known.

I would definately go into it with your mustang.

Good luck, and thanx for not being a breed snob!

Know thyself, know thy horse.
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