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paint question--kind of long

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  • Bald faced horses superstitions
  • Bald faced horses prone to cancer

 
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    09-22-2009, 07:27 PM
  #11
Weanling
I appreciate the answers. You have confirmed what I thought, but I just didn't have the backround to know for sure. I really do trust this instructor to make the best match of horse to kid, so I'm not going to ask to change. I think that would be just silly.
Here is a picture of them the first time they loped together.


And the smile on my daughter's face as they came around by me:
     
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    09-22-2009, 11:39 PM
  #12
Started
Oh gosh. He looks just like my Joey. Too cute. :]
     
    09-22-2009, 11:40 PM
  #13
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunny06    
Actually, little piece of trivia:

Bald faces are said to have the cancer gene as well as grey horses.

This dosen't mean they will get cancer but it does mean that they have a higher chance than let's say a sorrel.

This is not made up. There have been many tests. All come up positive. Our bald-faced grey horse had cancer. Died.

Sorry, not trying to scare OP.
Also, sorry for the double post.

Would you equate that to fair skinned people being more prone to skin cancer than dark skinned?

I think the OP was referring to color affecting the disposition of an animal.
     
    09-23-2009, 12:06 AM
  #14
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeahKathleen    
I think the OP was referring to color affecting the disposition of an animal.
Yes, that's what I was referring to. Thanks so much for the replies.
     
    09-23-2009, 05:35 PM
  #15
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeahKathleen    

Would you equate that to fair skinned people being more prone to skin cancer than dark skinned?
Well, I don't know. Is it a fact?

Quote:
I think the OP was referring to color affecting the disposition of an animal.
Random piece of trivia then.
     
    09-23-2009, 05:56 PM
  #16
Showing
I honestly don't think there's a problem with riding a bald faced, blue eyed horse. There are superstitions about sorrels being hyper, etc, etc, etc, when in reality, a horse's color or markings does not determine its temperament or ability. However, some horse people do believe that black feet tend to be harder than light feet, or more brittle than light feet. If this was true, you would expect to see a noticeable difference in health and lameness of different colored horses. The same goes for bald-faced, blue eyed paints. I wouldn't worry. Also, trust your trainer. If she says your daughter should try another horse, try another horse. If not, don't. Has the paint worked well in the past? Ever acted up before? There could very well have been a horsefly that bit him that caused him to react by bolting. As you probably know, the instinct for a horse is 'flight, not fight.' The rider could have been tense or ahead of the horse's movement and the horse picked up on it, or, as you mentioned, he might just have been raring to go at being in the outdoor arena....you never know. I wouldn't worry about it;)
     
    09-23-2009, 06:21 PM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by equiniphile    
I honestly don't think there's a problem with riding a bald faced, blue eyed horse. There are superstitions about sorrels being hyper, etc, etc, etc, when in reality, a horse's color or markings does not determine its temperament or ability. However, some horse people do believe that black feet tend to be harder than light feet, or more brittle than light feet. If this was true, you would expect to see a noticeable difference in health and lameness of different colored horses. The same goes for bald-faced, blue eyed paints. I wouldn't worry. Also, trust your trainer. If she says your daughter should try another horse, try another horse. If not, don't. Has the paint worked well in the past? Ever acted up before? There could very well have been a horsefly that bit him that caused him to react by bolting. As you probably know, the instinct for a horse is 'flight, not fight.' The rider could have been tense or ahead of the horse's movement and the horse picked up on it, or, as you mentioned, he might just have been raring to go at being in the outdoor arena....you never know. I wouldn't worry about it;)
This horse had been a perfect match for my daughter. I don't doubt the trainer matching them, I just wanted to know (which has been answered many times, exactly as I had expected) if there was any truth to the wild bald faced horses statement. He's a really sweet horse, and I think my daughter would be heartbroken to not ride him again.
     
    09-23-2009, 10:48 PM
  #18
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunny06    
Well, I don't know. Is it a fact?
Yep. Fair-skinned individuals are more likely to develop skin cancer than those with dark skin. Fact. :]
     
    09-24-2009, 04:34 AM
  #19
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunny06    
Actually, little piece of trivia:

Bald faces are said to have the cancer gene as well as grey horses.

This dosen't mean they will get cancer but it does mean that they have a higher chance than let's say a sorrel.

This is not made up. There have been many tests. All come up positive. Our bald-faced grey horse had cancer. Died.

Sorry, not trying to scare OP.

Yes, this is the same with people--certain races have higher chances to get certain diseases/cancers, etc.. However, this not the 'color' affecting the people to predispose them to a disease.

Same with the horses.
     
    09-24-2009, 04:03 PM
  #20
Weanling
Just a quick comment on the "cancer gene" post--

There CAN be animals (including peole) who inherit a gene or genes making them more susceptible to cancer (which is abnormal uncontrollable growth of cells). However in most cases, it is not that not that bald faced/blue eyed horses, or greys, have a "cancer gene".

With the bald faced/blue eyed horses, it is like in fair skinned people--- fairer skin is more vulnerable to sun damage because there is less melanin (pigment) protecting the skin cells. Thus, the environmental damage can cause cells to be altered, and respond by growing in a cancerous way. Bald faced horses have pink skin on their faces rather than pigmented skin, thus they are more vulnerable to cancerous growth caused by sun damage.

With grey horses, it is NOT lack of melanin-- as grey horses (assuming they do not also have pink skinned areas caused by other genes/patterns) have normal dark pigmented skin under their white coats. Ther problem is somewhat the opposite. The gene which causes greying shuts off the melanin from entering the hair shafts, so as a 'grey' horse ages its dark hairs are gradually replaced by white hair. The melanin continues to be produced however. The tumors that some grey horses get appear to be little pockets of collected compressed melanin. This type of 'cancer' is uslally benign and usually not life threataning-- although if tumors occur inside the body and constrict organs and/or compromise body functions, it can be fatal.
     

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