Peruvian Paso's
 
 

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Peruvian Paso's

This is a discussion on Peruvian Paso's within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • The health of the Peruvian Horse
  • Problem with peruvian pasos ankles

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  • 1 Post By Viranh
  • 1 Post By 4horses

 
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    09-09-2013, 01:10 PM
  #1
Weanling
Peruvian Paso's

Can they be used for jumping?
     
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    09-09-2013, 01:28 PM
  #2
Weanling
Oh yes, they can jump. Any horse can, it just depends on how the horses goes with it.
     
    09-09-2013, 02:15 PM
  #3
Weanling
I've seen gaited horses jump very well despite common belief. In my opinion, gaited horses seem to have a greater tendency to hollow out their back, therefore, it is evermore important to teach them to carry themselves properly. Otherwise, you may end up with a horse that has a very sore back. Look up "kissing spine".
     
    09-09-2013, 02:52 PM
  #4
Weanling
One of the Peruvians I ride certainly manages to hop over ditches and creeks nicely. At least it's an improvement on not crossing at all.
I do think that individual conformation plays a role in jumping, as does proper training, but I don't see why they couldn't do it a little for fun. I don't know that you'd ever place in a show, but I think the horse can probably do it.
smguidotti likes this.
     
    09-11-2013, 02:59 AM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilikehorses2    
Can they be used for jumping?
I suppose they could, but why? Peruvians have never been bred to be used as jumpers, hunters or eventers. Peruvians are bred to be the best and smoothest *riding* horse in the world. Jumping is really not their forte.

You didn't say how much jumping or what kind of jumping you want to do. An occasional small jump on a trail ride or trail course is no big deal, and of course they can do that. But if you're thinking of hunter/jumper type competitions you probably would be better off looking for a horse bred for that discipline.

What kind of jumping do you want a Peruvian to do?
     
    09-11-2013, 09:43 AM
  #6
Weanling
Just an ocasional small jump on the trail. Thanks everyone!
     
    09-13-2013, 12:15 AM
  #7
Yearling
I would suggest getting your Paso's ankles checked first. Paso's are prone to DSLD. If you have any puffiness, swelling, hind limb lameness, or the horse seems to hyperflex more than usual in his ankles, it could be DSLD.

Since Paso's are prone to DSLD, you do not want to stress the suspensory ligaments, as even years from now your horse could suddenly develop it.

I've also seen the initial signs in 4 yr old Saddlebreds. All I can say is that if your horse is an at risk breed, watch those ankles throughout the horse's life.

Some Personal Thoughts About DSLD & The Peruvian Paso Horse - Peruvian Horse World
HorseAndAHarley likes this.
     
    09-13-2013, 06:08 PM
  #8
Foal
Could they, sure. Would they be very good at it or place very well at a show? Not likely.

They are a gorgeous, wonderful breed of horse who was designed to have a smooth, ground covering natural gait. Part of their gait is their "termino" or the sort of paddling motion that they do with their lower leg from knee down which can be fairly counterproductive to jumping. As someone else said, it also comes down to the individual horses conformation as well.

For the amount of money a good registered Peruvian will cost you, you would be better off getting another breed more suited to jumping if that is what you really want to do. I know in my area a young Peruvian just started in bit goes for $7,000.
     
    09-15-2013, 06:02 PM
  #9
Foal
Please don't post opinion as fact

Quote:
Originally Posted by 4horses    
I would suggest getting your Paso's ankles checked first. Paso's are prone to DSLD. If you have any puffiness, swelling, hind limb lameness, or the horse seems to hyperflex more than usual in his ankles, it could be DSLD.

Since Paso's are prone to DSLD, you do not want to stress the suspensory ligaments, as even years from now your horse could suddenly develop it.

I've also seen the initial signs in 4 yr old Saddlebreds. All I can say is that if your horse is an at risk breed, watch those ankles throughout the horse's life.

Some Personal Thoughts About DSLD & The Peruvian Paso Horse - Peruvian Horse World
I'm sorry, but it sickens me to read posts from people who know nothing about the Peruvian breed who somehow feel compelled to write nonsense like this. None of what is posted above, including the information at the link, is factual. It's opinion. It's wrong and it serves no good purpose to present opinion as if it were fact. Ignorance of the facts is not an excuse for posting rumor, innuendo and misinformation.

I think the thing that bothers me the most are the statements that have been made that “no Peruvian horse is safe”, “no bloodline is free of the disease” and “the disease is rampant in the breed”. The general message that is being fed to the public is that if you have a Peruvian Horse, sooner or later your horse will be affected by dsld. NONE of these statements has been backed up with any credible evidence whatsoever.

I have been in the Peruvian breed since 1995 so I have been paying attention to this issue for over 15 years. The facts about DSLD are as follows:

Nobody really knows what "dsld" is. Research done in 2006 concluded that dsld is an "abnormal accumulation of proteoglycans" in connective tissues. Research done in 2009, however, contradicts that theory and "found no evidence that DSLD is a systemic proteoglycan deposition disease."

There are a lot of self-proclaimed "experts" out there (like the woman in the linked post) who claim it's a genetic disease. Research on dsld has been underway for years and - I will point out - Peruvian breeders have provided MOST of the funding for that research. So nobody is hiding "their head in the sand".

Research thus far has not discovered a "dsld gene" - there is no genetic test for dsld. Usually one of the first things researchers discover about genetic diseases is the mode of inheritance. HYPP was shown to follow a dominant mode of inheritance even before the gene was discovered. SIDS in Arabs was a known recessive trait years before the gene that causes it was discovered. To this date the research on dsld has yet to reveal a genetic mode of inheritance. The condition doesn't seem to follow either a dominant or recessive mode of inheritance.

Some further background: The original "research" done on dsld was a simple data search query. The query gathered data from 29 veterinary school hospitals in North America over a 10-year period (1987 to 1997). Again, this was simply a data search - no horses of any breed were ever examined for this project.

The data was searched for the following diagnoses: Suspensory Ligament Desmitis, Suspensory Ligament Rupture, Suspensory Ligament Sprain, and Suspensory Ligament Laxity. At the time this query was run these were the only codes for suspensory ligament disease in the veterinary computer database. In other words, anything and everything that affected the suspensory ligaments of these horses got lumped together under the heading "suspensory disease". Suspensory rupture is not a disease. Suspensory strain is not a disease.

After the data was extracted by "breed", the number of horses diagnosed with any of the suspensory problems listed above was compared to the number of horses of each breed that were brought in to the veterinary hospitals for any problem. It was claimed that "That normalizes the percentages to the number of horses in the population." No, it doesn't. It only compares horses that have been diagnosed with suspensory problems to horses that have been diagnosed with other health problems at those veterinary hospitals. It does not compare the number of horses with "suspensory problems" to the population of healthy horses or to the total population of horses of each breed.

This was a very flawed "research project". But perhaps the most terrible result of this initial research is that it was used as the basis for even more flawed "research". And yes, this nonsense is still being used to blacken the reputation of a wonderful breed.

Regarding hyperflexion of the pasterns: Hyperflexion of the pasterns is NOT an indication of DSLD. Hyperflexion can be caused by fatigue. I wrote a post about this that you can see here:

http://www.horseforum.com/horse-riding/horse-sets-back-pasterns-canter-what-151918/page2/#post1873531

The photos in my post show horse after horse after horse both under saddle and at liberty, with horizontal fetlocks both front and back while the horse is in motion. When a horse is in rapid motion, especially with a rider on its back, the pasterns are going to flex more than they will when the horse is standing or walking around loose in a field. If the horse is tired, the pastern flexes even more. Does this mean that all these horses pictured with their pasterns level while in motion are dsld affected? NO. Does this mean they will all come up with dsld in the future? NO. Does it indicate they all may be carrying a lot of weight on that flexed pastern? Yes. Is it an indication that they all could be tired? Yes, especially if the photo was taken while the horse was working hard or after it had been working hard.
     

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