QH bloodlines vs temperment - Page 2
   

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QH bloodlines vs temperment

This is a discussion on QH bloodlines vs temperment within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        01-28-2014, 04:39 PM
      #11
    Started
    Quote:
    Many of them were very sensitive and tended toward over-reaction, especially during the training phase. If you ever got one broke enough you could trust him, then you'd have a stellar horse...but getting them to that point wasn't for the faint of heart.
    the mare I mentioned above I ADORE, to the point I'm selling my 3 year old I really like and buying her instead. She is hardworking, athletic, honest, intelligent and responsive. Exactly what I want in a saddle horse for myself personally. Near as I can figure(all conjecture) She was owned by someone and kept at a barn with an indoor, blanketed and in her own pasture. I'm guessing she badly intimidated her owner with her sensitivity and reactiveness, so she was sold. She can turn right out from under you if you don't pay attention. But an awesome, awesome little horse, with tons of heart.

    two of the doc bar horses I worked with were sensitive to the point of being explosive, they could out buck most rodeo horses, and they were in general a huge handful. Athletic? Yes, extremely. Responsive to cues? To a fault. Recreational rider friendly? NOPE.
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        01-28-2014, 05:16 PM
      #12
    Showing
    LOL, the more I thought about it, I remembered that I have a total of 3 offspring of that Doc Olena stud in my pasture. The oldest is Nester. He's our old bombproof, kid-catcher that is so ploddy and pluggy that I hate riding him. BUT, he's over 21 years old now. He was a bit of an outlaw in his younger days.

    The second is Snuffy, the horse that I was discussing earlier. Put a kid or a beginner on him and he's a plug. Put someone on him that really knows how to ride and he'll hop around and puff and squeal the first time you put him on a cow or the first time you ask him for a lope.

    The third is my Dad's horse Pokey. He's a monster. I've ridden some pretty rank horses in my day and I don't think I would have had the balls to break him to ride. He wouldn't really buck, but he's spook and bolt and spin with the very best of him...and he was so athletic that you just couldn't stay with him. I don't think he'll ever be "user friendly" LOL.
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        01-28-2014, 07:28 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    

    Though, if it's not broke, I wouldn't advise a green horse with those bloodlines for anyone less than an expert rider....just to be on the safe side.
    too late --- she's been in the pasture since august -- just trying to figure out how hard it is going to be, or if it is worth the time and trouble only to find out she is too much
         
        01-28-2014, 07:32 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    LOL, the more I thought about it, I remembered that I have a total of 3 offspring of that Doc Olena stud in my pasture. The oldest is Nester. He's our old bombproof, kid-catcher that is so ploddy and pluggy that I hate riding him. BUT, he's over 21 years old now. He was a bit of an outlaw in his younger days.

    The second is Snuffy, the horse that I was discussing earlier. Put a kid or a beginner on him and he's a plug. Put someone on him that really knows how to ride and he'll hop around and puff and squeal the first time you put him on a cow or the first time you ask him for a lope.

    The third is my Dad's horse Pokey. He's a monster. I've ridden some pretty rank horses in my day and I don't think I would have had the balls to break him to ride. He wouldn't really buck, but he's spook and bolt and spin with the very best of him...and he was so athletic that you just couldn't stay with him. I don't think he'll ever be "user friendly" LOL.
    sounds like they can be all over the place as far as reliability and sensitivity goes


    Anyone have experience with the other side of her line -- the docs hickory side?
         
        01-29-2014, 10:06 AM
      #15
    Showing
    Best advice I can give you is to find a good trainer. Horses who breed true to the temperament of their lines, you want them to get a good start from day 1. If they are ever allowed to start dumping people on purpose, then you'll just be stuck with something unrideable.

    Something to consider...you spend the dough to get her trained only to find out that she's a little too much for you. With her lines, if she's built well, you could market her to a ranch/cowboy market and, if her training is good, then she'd be worth a pretty penny even with a sensitive temperament. Because she's a mare, she'd also be worth more than a gelding due to the possibility of being a broodmare...if her conformation is good.
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        01-29-2014, 10:20 AM
      #16
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    Best advice I can give you is to find a good trainer. Horses who breed true to the temperament of their lines, you want them to get a good start from day 1. If they are ever allowed to start dumping people on purpose, then you'll just be stuck with something unrideable.

    Something to consider...you spend the dough to get her trained only to find out that she's a little too much for you. With her lines, if she's built well, you could market her to a ranch/cowboy market and, if her training is good, then she'd be worth a pretty penny even with a sensitive temperament. Because she's a mare, she'd also be worth more than a gelding due to the possibility of being a broodmare...if her conformation is good.
    thanks smrobs -- I appreciate the advice

    Still too young to ride, but I have her started with ground work, and I am considering sending her away for a month to get a foundation on her

    Will get some pics up sometime this summer for conformation critique
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        01-29-2014, 10:45 AM
      #17
    Weanling
    I have a colt who is Docs Hickory down to High Brow Cat bred, and he is smart as a whip and nothing seems to really phase him. He picks up things quickly, is not high strung (not to say he does not spook a little still when trying to get a blanket on him), and he was raised wild until we got him at 10 months. Most of the things he tries to pull are what I chalk up to as typical youngster antics that he is not allowed to get away with.
         
        01-29-2014, 10:45 AM
      #18
    Yearling
    My gelding has both doc bar and colonol freckles up close. And he is hot as all get up when he wants to be. But it is a completely controllable hot.
    Posted via Mobile Device
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        01-29-2014, 12:47 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    QHD--I had an Impressive bred filly. Though I never really connected with her (which was due mostly to my own inexperience) everyone absolutely loved her.
         
        01-29-2014, 01:19 PM
      #20
    Started
    I would have to say that, from what I have seen, definitely yes. Bloodlines do seem to make a huge difference in temperament. I have noticed a certain line that is quite athletic and easy-going, and another that was downright mean and nasty. It pays to look at the pedigree.
         

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