A stagy gelding
   

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A stagy gelding

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  • Gelding very protective of his mare
  • Do geldings have testosterone

 
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    12-03-2012, 01:40 PM
  #1
Foal
A stagy gelding

Would like to know more information about stagy geldings in any stages.

My boy was 2 years old when he bred three mares. He turned into a terror, caused injuries and was gelded at 3 years old.
He has been a gelding for 4 years now and still act's studly to an extent.
The vet gave him an exam two years ago and cleared him of any testicle problems and cryptic issues and he is 100% fine just may have testosterone left.

He is the alpha in the pasture, moving mares around from other geldings. He will run himself into the ground circling his band of mares. He acts like a stallion in the wild. He will toss his head around and always be first for anything. From water trough to being lead in or out. If there is a foal in the herd he is a babysitter and always close to the broodmare but never to close.

Very interested to find out what everyone here thinks about stagy geldings.
I have known a few different stallions gelded at different ages with many foal crops and none of them act like a stud anymore.
     
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    12-03-2012, 02:07 PM
  #2
Green Broke
My gelding was gelded young [and for good reason - conformationally he's a bit of a train wreck] and he went REALLY studdy when I got my filly. All of a sudden presence like WOW and sweet-talking everyone with those low nicker-growl sort of noises and licking constantly. He started yelling... a lot... out on rides, got incredibly possessive of his girls to the point of almost running the little pony gelding through a fence, the list goes on.

He's settled down now but for a few days there I had me a stud with no balls. Only thing I didn't catch him doing is actually mounting mares. He is definitely a gelding despite his behaviour those few days.

Some geldings are just studdy. Some studs you would never guess were entire. The later you geld them the more likely they are to be studdy later in life, I worked for a big-name breeder for a little while and was told to be careful of the late-cuts [late-cut meaning cut after covering a few mares] because even though they were "geldingy" 99.99999% of the time you just never really know.

I have seen late-cuts marketed as "for men only", which I don't personally agree with after hearing about my current boss's experience with her stallion [he was dangerous for the man she bought him off, quiet as a lamb for her], but that fact sort of highlights for me that a lot of boys cut after they've sired some foals are more studdy than a gelding cut young.
     
    12-03-2012, 02:31 PM
  #3
Green Broke
My gelding was cut at 18mos when I bought him and to my knowledge never covered a mare at the time. He's always acted on the studly side, gets really excited around some mares in heat (not all) and will mount them in a pasture.

I had a talk with my vet when he was gelded. He said how a gelding will act depends on how much testosterone their body makes from other sources after gelding. Produce enough and the guy will never know he was cut, which probably means an uncontrollable stallion if not cut.
     
    12-04-2012, 03:00 PM
  #4
Weanling
I think you may have answered your own problem. Although he was gelded, you're still running him with mares. He doesn't know he's been gelded and its his natural instincts taking over. Have you thought about running him with some other geldings for a while without mares in the same field? We keep mares and geldings separate and it seems to work for us. There is always a dominent horse in each herd be it mares or geldings. Geldings will also 'babysit' youngsters and become very protective of their charges but normally it does no harm. However, if we were to put mares and geldings together, all hell would break loose. We tried it once, never again. They all got far too stressed. Its a bit like showing a kid candy then not letting him eat it.
     
    12-04-2012, 03:21 PM
  #5
Started
I've seen so many that go both ways.

My clyde covered at least one mare, was gelded at 5.5 years old, and you would never, EVER know it.

On the other hand my BO bought a 3 month old colt. He was an angel to work with, so super quiet and smart. Gelded at 10 months(i watched the surgery) with no issues what so ever. Never acted study, never bred a mare. Started getting studdy at 4, even to the point of fully breeding mares.
     
    12-05-2012, 10:51 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
BlueBird, I think you may have answered your own problem. Although he was gelded, you're still running him with mares. He doesn't know he's been gelded and its his natural instincts taking over. Have you thought about running him with some other geldings for a while without mares in the same field? We keep mares and geldings separate and it seems to work for us. There is always a dominent horse in each herd be it mares or geldings. Geldings will also 'babysit' youngsters and become very protective of their charges but normally it does no harm. However, if we were to put mares and geldings together, all hell would break loose. We tried it once, never again. They all got far too stressed. Its a bit like showing a kid candy then not letting him eat it.
I have kept him at a boarding facility a few times over the years for camp, lessons or winter. He has been pastured with just geldings and he has to go out with the big dogs. IE: Draft horses... He is a complete jerk with geldings and will pick fights, beat up on and just be a pest. But if he with the big dogs he gets tore up.
The barn owner puts him out with the mares and he is at peace without geldings. He is her only exception. When he comes home he is out with all mares too. Until our colt was born and he has had a best friend since and protects him.

I just went smart and bought mares instead of geldings to keep him happy.

It seems though he will never loose the studly in him.

Although it doesn't bother me as he is not harmful just annoying at times.
But he only acts like this in a pasture. Yet since the colt he can changed alot.
     
    12-06-2012, 10:19 AM
  #7
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokum    
I have kept him at a boarding facility a few times over the years for camp, lessons or winter. He has been pastured with just geldings and he has to go out with the big dogs. IE: Draft horses... He is a complete jerk with geldings and will pick fights, beat up on and just be a pest. But if he with the big dogs he gets tore up.
The barn owner puts him out with the mares and he is at peace without geldings. He is her only exception. When he comes home he is out with all mares too. Until our colt was born and he has had a best friend since and protects him.

I just went smart and bought mares instead of geldings to keep him happy.

It seems though he will never loose the studly in him.

Although it doesn't bother me as he is not harmful just annoying at times.
But he only acts like this in a pasture. Yet since the colt he can changed alot.
The behavior you describe is not unusual. Some geldings just acquire a mental attitude while still intact. After gelding it's not a hormone thing, but rather just a carryover in attitude. Some get over it quickly, with some it takes longer, and some never get over it. Almost invariably they get along just fine with mares, but have problems with other geldings or stallions. A lot of it arises from "gelding play". As most people know, geldings play rather rough - mares rarely play, and a gelding with an attitude will consider the play competitive to establish dominance (which is the basis of the play to begin with in males), so you end up with one gelding playing for fun and the other playing with intent - a bad situation.

I've raised and trained a lot of horses and don't have any advice to offer on modifying their behavior...you can train them to behave when you are with them, but there is nothing you can do when they are out in the pasture...usually the attitude wears off with time, but some just stay that way...
     

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