TB + Beginner = no no? - Page 2
 
 

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TB + Beginner = no no?

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  • Are tb goid beginner horses

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    03-13-2013, 11:35 AM
  #11
Foal
Thank you! This is the feedback I needed. I love the IDEA of a TB. I run a greyhound adoption group, so TBs have a sweet spot. I guess I need to stick to finding a 14-15hh horse that's broke, docile, friendly, and great with kids. Easy peasy right? Lol.
     
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    03-13-2013, 11:45 AM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by greytpets    
Thank you! This is the feedback I needed. I love the IDEA of a TB. I run a greyhound adoption group, so TBs have a sweet spot. I guess I need to stick to finding a 14-15hh horse that's broke, docile, friendly, and great with kids. Easy peasy right? Lol.

That's the way I would go, good luck.

Kind of like a first time dog owner getting a rescue greyhound. Would not recommend it.

I met some people on an airplane that told me all about their rescue greyhounds.
I had no idea. They had me in stitches with the stories. They had no idea how to walk down stairs, they would walk into the glass doors, jump on the coffee table, had to have a very secure fenced in yard. I have always wanted one, but that's a lot of work.
     
    03-13-2013, 11:54 AM
  #13
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taffy Clayton    
That's the way I would go, good luck.

Kind of like a first time dog owner getting a rescue greyhound. Would not recommend it.

I met some people on an airplane that told me all about their rescue greyhounds.
I had no idea. They had me in stitches with the stories. They had no idea how to walk down stairs, they would walk into the glass doors, jump on the coffee table, had to have a very secure fenced in yard. I have always wanted one, but that's a lot of work.
Greyhounds are WONDERFUL, we've adopted out several to first time dog owners. Really, the only big rule is no off-lead. They're perfectly fine with 3-4 walks a day. They're built for short bursts of speed, so they arent very active in a home... Just a few minutes of goofiness every day and then they find a spot and lay down. They're huge velcro dogs... I guess the horse term would be "in your pocket".

Their acclimation period is the only thing to worry about as far as rules and glass doors, stairs etc. After the first week or two, they are comfortable in their environment, and its no longer an issue.

I dislike the word rescue, lol. They really are treated well while racing, and adoption rate as a whole is over 90% (Far more than any other dog breed, more goldens are euthanized in shelters per year than greyhounds), so I personally don't think I'm "rescuing" them from anything. Now, Spanish Galgos, THOSE are rescues. They string those guys up in trees after hunting season is over.

.......and there I go on a greyhound tangent..... I would love to go on a horse tangent someday!!
     
    03-13-2013, 11:58 AM
  #14
Trained
[QUOTE=. Now, Spanish Galgos, THOSE are rescues. They string those guys up in trees after hunting season is over.

.......and there I go on a greyhound tangent..... I would love to go on a horse tangent someday!![/QUOTE]

I've always wanted a Spanish galgo. I found one a few years ago on Petfinder named Zara that I was in love with, but didn't have the money to adopt one then. My two breeds that I absolutely WILL own one day are a cairn terrier and a galgo.
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    03-13-2013, 12:32 PM
  #15
Foal
Really depends on the particular TB, honestly if a horse used to have big bucking problems, etc but has been doing better it still may be a bad choice as horses who learn they can get away with something can regress rather quickly in their training and behavior. I would go with something that is a proven steady eddy, been there done that kind of horse, even if its not fancy or anything (just my personal opinion)
I have a TB and I would not put a beginner on her, she is 16 yo but is too sensitive and if she knows you don't know what you're doing or are not paying attention she will take advantage. My Saddlebredx who people tend to assume will be a bit of a nut when they hear he is half saddlebred is so good for beginners though bc he would really rather go as slow as possible :p so, proof that it really just depends on the particular pony!
Good luck in your horse search!!
     
    03-13-2013, 12:32 PM
  #16
Trained
I have owned two OTTB's and they were both hard keepers. That is more of a problem if you board bc others will complain that you don't feed your horse.
Almost ALL TB's on the market are OTTB's (Off the Track Thoroughbreds.) Track trainers see little need in many ground manners, and sell them off before they are trained to:
1) tie to a post
2) flex
3) give to the bit
4) listen to walk and trot and canter cues
Hunter/Jumper ppl like to buy and retrain them bc many are scopey.
Why should you care? BC they HAVE been trained to run fast, in a straight line, as if a predator was chasing them.
The least expensive TB's are right off of the track bc:
1) Not fast enough to cover their keep$
2) Injured/recovered from an injury and cannot cover their keep$
Sometimes somebody will train one of these well and then resell. If I did that it would be bc the OTTB:
1) Suffers from a permanent, recurring injury and not always sound
2) Cannot handle desensitization training to those noises and objects I would meet trail riding, etc.
(I am retired from CW Reenacting, after 26 years.)
Still interested?
     
    03-13-2013, 12:52 PM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal    
I have owned two OTTB's and they were both hard keepers. That is more of a problem if you board bc others will complain that you don't feed your horse.
Almost ALL TB's on the market are OTTB's (Off the Track Thoroughbreds.) Track trainers see little need in many ground manners, and sell them off before they are trained to:
1) tie to a post
2) flex
3) give to the bit
4) listen to walk and trot and canter cues
Hunter/Jumper ppl like to buy and retrain them bc many are scopey.
Why should you care? BC they HAVE been trained to run fast, in a straight line, as if a predator was chasing them.
The least expensive TB's are right off of the track bc:
1) Not fast enough to cover their keep$
2) Injured/recovered from an injury and cannot cover their keep$
Sometimes somebody will train one of these well and then resell. If I did that it would be bc the OTTB:
1) Suffers from a permanent, recurring injury and not always sound
2) Cannot handle desensitization training to those noises and objects I would meet trail riding, etc.
(I am retired from CW Reenacting, after 26 years.)
Still interested?
Interesting to hear that that's the case on your side of the pond. Over here less than a third of tbs are ottbs - most are bred as riding horses or eventers. I've ridden many tb riding horses, of which only one was a nutcase - most are very intelligent and want to work with you.

To the OP - I will agree that tbs can be more difficult to manage as they often have poorer foot quality (requiring shoes), thin skin (requiring rugs, but care in fitting rugs so they don't rub!) high withers (so careful saddle fitting) and are often poor doers, so need a good high quality fibre diet with high fat rather than high starch feed as some bloodlines can also be prone to laminitis. Whilst character varies between horses and some are ideal for beginners, they aren't the easiest breed of horse to keep...
     
    03-13-2013, 01:26 PM
  #18
Green Broke
Evaluate the horses individually, and ideally take a knowledgeable friend with you.

On the farm right now there are about 10 ottb's, half are very hard keepers, half are fat

Half are handfuls, half are really easyoing. One gelding is super safe and honest, and with only about 15 rides off the track he is beginner safe in the arena, and only needs an intermediate rider out in the open on trails, just because he is a bit more energetic.

I don't recomend an OTTB right off the track to a beginner, but one that has the right temperment and has be retrained right could be suitable.
     
    03-15-2013, 08:14 PM
  #19
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by greytpets    
We are planning on getting goats. Although my husband keeps telling me how "cute" the young calves are on the drive home. *eye roll*

We are taking this process slow. I want to make sure the horse we end up with is the Right fit for our family. My heart has tugged at two horses we've met already. But my head knows they weren't a good fit.

I ask about the thoroughbred because there's a rescue not far away that has one up for adoption. 15 hands. She came in bucking and biting and after lots of work and rehab they say she is a delight.
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Do not get a horse that came in with major issues. While she may be "delight" for them? She will more than likely revert to that behavior if new owners aren't experienced.

It costs just as much to keep a horse that you cannot enjoy, can't ride, and can't trust, as it does to keep one that you can do all of that with.

And have seen way too many rescues that tell folks the horse is perfect, when it isn't too.

Personally, I would rather deal with individual than a rescue. Many times, those horses are there for a reason, and it takes someone with experience to deal with them.
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    03-17-2013, 12:59 PM
  #20
Started
I would say no way for a fresh OTTB to a new horse person owner. I have seen it work out well. There is a period of handling off the track that for a certain percentage of TBs requires experience. I am breed bias towards standardbreds but I tend to feel that a new horse person owner and a standardbred is a better combination than a new horse person owner and a thoroughbred. As others have said there is a percentage of horses that are total sweet and great horses. I guess at the end of the day what are your plans for this horse? Find a horse that matches those goals regardless of breed.

That said, before getting any horse. Think and evaluate your horse experience and the horse experience of those around you. Be honest. Then find a horse that fits and matches that. This may mean waiting and it could mean getting a horse that is not that flashy. A steady horse that is safe to be around is worth more then all the good looks and good feelings you get rescuing a horse.
     

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