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Thinking about saving this horse...

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        01-27-2008, 05:34 PM
      #21
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Delregans Way
    Going back a fair while, about you saying making a profit out of horses seems "cold". I disagree, when you ride a horse, ur not suppose to be in love with it, on the ground, yeh go for ur life... I don't think its cold, or mean... that's pples job, that's there life, they breed, sell, buy and make a profit... that's what the horse industry is all about. :)

    Ok... well I'm just not that kind of person.
    I keep my horses for life! :)
         
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        01-27-2008, 05:40 PM
      #22
    Showing
    HorseLuver, no I don't own any horses right now, although I'm hoping to in the near future. I have owned 2 in the past (Highland Dancer, a TB mare, and Cinzano, a Holsteiner gelding)... along with training countless others.
    I'm currently training one and looking to take on a couple more, as well as get my own.

    And I agree with Delregan's Way - I will probably be looking to buy a horse to train and re-sell... that way I can work up to the horse I really want. Yes, I develop relationships with my mare, however I have no problems with buying to sell.
         
        01-27-2008, 05:43 PM
      #23
    Yearling
    Cool hope all goes well! :) Do you just train Dressage?
         
        01-27-2008, 05:46 PM
      #24
    Yearling
    I couldn't sell Janie though. She's more than just an animal to me. :)
         
        01-27-2008, 05:50 PM
      #25
    Showing
    Well, yes.. I do enjoy Dressage a lot, and I believe it is the base to all riding, however it's not my ONLY discipline. For the first 12-13 years of my riding career, I was a devoted hunter, and still really enjoy jumping. I've also dabbled in a good portion of everything else out there as well :)

    And it's understandable that you are so attached to Janie, I was very attached to Dancer when I owned her, however I surpassed her abilities and so decided to sell her to a nice family... and then somehow she ended up being bought by my trainer, so I can see her and ride her whenever I want and I know she's in a good home.
         
        01-27-2008, 06:34 PM
      #26
    Yearling
    I got bored doing dressage at the last place I rode however it helped with the overall smoothness and head carrige of the horse. I now do Jumping, Reining, and small amounts of Dressage.
         
        01-27-2008, 06:45 PM
      #27
    Showing
    I like to think of it this way:
    All (high-level) jumpers are dressage horses... haha but not all dressage horses are jumpers. Jumpers have to have that base of high-level dressage in order to get around the courses safely and effectively.
    And I agree, lower level dressage is as boring as watching paint dry... but when you get into the higher level stuff, like piaffe, passage, half-pass, travers, renvers, and pirouettes, it becomes very interesting because of the complexity of it. I love it :) There's nothing like jumping on a horse (in my case it was my ex-trainer's stallion) bareback and in a halter, and getting him to preform those movements... *wistful sigh*
         
        01-27-2008, 07:10 PM
      #28
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Delregans Way
    Going back a fair while, about you saying making a profit out of horses seems "cold". I disagree, when you ride a horse, ur not suppose to be in love with it, on the ground, yeh go for ur life... I don't think its cold, or mean... that's pples job, that's there life, they breed, sell, buy and make a profit... that's what the horse industry is all about. :)
    i agree. There is nothing cold about saving horses from one place or another and then finding good homes for them later. A lot of horses that have been neglected don't catch the eye of many people but once they have been feed up and had some work done they can be lovely horses. I find it admirable that there are people out there who fix horses up and find them forever homes. By them not keeping the horses it means they have the time and resources to save and fix even more horses.
         
        01-27-2008, 08:26 PM
      #29
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt
    I like to think of it this way:
    All (high-level) jumpers are dressage horses... haha but not all dressage horses are jumpers. Jumpers have to have that base of high-level dressage in order to get around the courses safely and effectively.
    And I agree, lower level dressage is as boring as watching paint dry... but when you get into the higher level stuff, like piaffe, passage, half-pass, travers, renvers, and pirouettes, it becomes very interesting because of the complexity of it. I love it :) There's nothing like jumping on a horse (in my case it was my ex-trainer's stallion) bareback and in a halter, and getting him to preform those movements... *wistful sigh*
    I agree, once you get to the higher level dressage it's really neat. Do you train horses to do the piaffe and passage? How do you get them to do that?
         
        01-27-2008, 11:38 PM
      #30
    Showing
    Yes, I was working on the piaffe, passage and pirouette with my trainer's stallion. He and I had this really neat connection :) Anyways, it's fairly hard to explain, at least for me :P but with the piaffe I just thought of creating a wall in front of him with my seat and hands while asking him to keep trotting with my legs. Use of a whip to teach impulsion from behind was really useful as well. It's just a really really collected trot while encouraging animation from the legs. The passage is an extension of this.
    Of course it goes without saying, but it takes a LONG time for horses to reach this point as they need to build the muscle required for the movement, and the stallion I was working was 8 before I could ask it of him, and I would strongly warn you (meaning anyone) to not try this before your horse is ready.. at best it could not work and at worst you could hurt your horse. The only two horses I've ever done a piaffe on were well schooled in dressage and had the muscular control to be able to do it :)
         

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