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Thoroughbred

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    02-10-2010, 01:42 AM
  #1
Foal
Question Thoroughbred

Today I was told that I should stay away from buying a TB as they are expensive to buy and extremely expensive to keep because they have a lot of problems with there legs, back etc. Is this true? What are everyones experiences with TB's?

Pure bred dogs I've heard get a lot more problems than a cross bred dog is this true also for horses?
Would it be best to try and find a cross breed rather than a pure breed horse? Are TB's good for jumping or should I look at other breeds? If so what breeds are best suited?
     
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    02-10-2010, 02:15 AM
  #2
Started
Thoroughbreds are great horses. They tend to have a bit more energy than other horses, but there are exceptions to that. I have a 12 y/o grade TB gelding who was never raced and he has pretty low energy for a TB, but a bit higher than averages of other breeds I've worked with.
Horses who were raced seem to be more prone to health issues than unraced horses. With that said, my TB has had a few more issues than other horses I've had. For the most part I think this is due to his slightly higher energy level.
They're definitely great for jumping. They're very willing and intelligent horses with great stamina. My guy works as hard as he can at whatever I point him to.

What it comes down to is that with any horse you are interested in buying, it's best to have him vet checked or at least looked over by a professional. Always, always bring a trainer that knows your abilities and needs. A good trainer should also be able to see any obvious signs that a horse is prone to any kind of health issue..but a vet is best for that.
Try to avoid discriminating by breed. Just look for any horse that suits you and your needs: one that has the proper training, energy level, conformation, etc..and have a vet confirm that the horse is in good health.
     
    02-10-2010, 02:19 AM
  #3
Weanling
I have a TB and they are just the same amount to keep as any old breed. Yes, some can be energetic, but some, 110% Bombproof.
It can depend on weather they were raced, I have been told/read/seen.

(:
     
    02-10-2010, 03:13 AM
  #4
Yearling
Thoroughbreds are widely known to be hot horses, however I have met quite a few that you would never have known were Tb's. That being said, I do not think that you should get a Tb for a first(?) horse unless you find one that suits your abilities. Also, don't let anybody talk you out of a horse because of breed. I personally stick to mainly stock breeds, and don't particularly care for gaited breeds. However, I have nothing against them and if that's what you like then so be it, I respect the decision. Just not my cup of tea. Be sure to look for a horse that suits YOU, not somebody else's idea of what you should have. Look for temperament, training level, conformation, soundness, etc., before you look at the breed.
     
    02-10-2010, 03:15 AM
  #5
Started
I can share with you my experience with OTTB's just from last summer to now. Please note these were not my horses. They were not my fiance's horses. They were his brother and left in our care, we had to ask permission before doing anything for these horses care.

My fiance's brother races thoroughbred horses in Az. Over the summer he brought up 4 of them. Of the 4 of them, I rode 3. Of that three, 2 were really well broke and so laid back it wasn't funny. It was hard to imagine them as racing horses. I used them on the farm for trail riding, for local fun shows (barrels, poles, etc), for chasing our cattle. They were wonderful ride and up for anything you asked of them. I rode them maybe a handful of times over the summer.

As far as keeping, I will say that they were extremely hard to keep. Of the 4 that were here. 3 of them showed signs of losing weight and problems keeping weight on. Of the 3, 2 seemed worse than the others. We offered them not only free choice pasture, but hay as well, along with sweet feed, alfalfa pellets, oats, beet pulp, and a few suppliments. Of the 2, 1 had an old injury from the track that seemed to flair up big time while he was here. We had the vet out a few times to look at it. The vet's suggestion was that he was never going to walk correctly again combined with weight loss, to put him humanely to sleep. We thought as long as he was showing us he wanted to live, we would not choose that route. Unfortunately we think his heart gave out because he passed away unexpectedly one morning. Of the 3 that were left, 1 was taken back down to Az and months later passed away unexpectedly. (I do not know the circumstances behind this.)

That left us with the one that never had any problems and another hard keeper. It's taken MONTHS for her body to adapt to her new situation (and us alot of feed and vet bills) These two are now doing really well and are maintaining a good weight.

I would never want to own a thoroughbred. I am sure others could be different but this was my experience and I'd not want to do it agian.
     
    02-10-2010, 03:25 AM
  #6
Yearling
An experience with only four Thoroughbreds shouldn't be enough to change one's mind. My grandmother's best mare was a 25+ year old Tb. At the other end of the spectrum I knew an excellent open jumper/dressage mare but she was way too strong for beginners or even intermediate riders. In the same barn another one was so quiet you could throw the earliest beginners on him. It's not necessarily about breed, but the individual.
     
    02-10-2010, 03:36 AM
  #7
Started
Like I said..it was just my experience and my humble opinion.
     
    02-10-2010, 11:41 AM
  #8
Weanling
I've ridden a lot of TBs and OTTBs and I have to say they require a bit more finesse then other breeds. The OTTBs tend to be hotter then most horses because they are used to being grained up to their eyeballs and letting out their energy in explosive bursts down the track, but that doesn't mean you can't turn around and make that horse a nice Hunter, you just need to be patient and work on it.

I've found with my experience with the breed is that they are smart and brave. Excellent riding horses, with great personalities.

My horse isn't that hard to keep, the first year I was pumping a lot of hay in him but eventually his Metabolism adjusted to his new life and I feed him just as much as any other horse.

As far as care goes most of the TBs that we get from the track have a bow or other injury, (mine had a torn suspensory) but if you give them the time off and slowly bring them back they have NO Issues. My horse has poor feet but through proper nutrition and corrective shoeing he has had Zilch problems.

I recommend this book for anyone thinking of taking an OTTB who doesn't have much experience with them http://www.amazon.com/Beyond-Track-Retraining-Thoroughbred-Racecourse/dp/1570764026/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265819919&sr=8-2
     
    02-10-2010, 12:30 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Void    
I've ridden a lot of TBs and OTTBs and I have to say they require a bit more finesse then other breeds. The OTTBs tend to be hotter then most horses because they are used to being grained up to their eyeballs and letting out their energy in explosive bursts down the track, but that doesn't mean you can't turn around and make that horse a nice Hunter, you just need to be patient and work on it.

I've found with my experience with the breed is that they are smart and brave. Excellent riding horses, with great personalities.

My horse isn't that hard to keep, the first year I was pumping a lot of hay in him but eventually his Metabolism adjusted to his new life and I feed him just as much as any other horse.

As far as care goes most of the TBs that we get from the track have a bow or other injury, (mine had a torn suspensory) but if you give them the time off and slowly bring them back they have NO Issues. My horse has poor feet but through proper nutrition and corrective shoeing he has had Zilch problems.

I recommend this book for anyone thinking of taking an OTTB who doesn't have much experience with them Beyond the Track
I agree with this.

TBs and OTTBs can be excellent horses. They Excel at Eventing, Trail Riding, etc. I have an OTTB and I can tell you he's a handful, at 20 years old, he still keeps me on my toes.

They DO require a bit more work than most other breeds. Titan is not a horse that I could stick out in a pasture all winter and then expect him to be willing to want to ride first thing come spring. They are definitely more work than most. But than again, I've met OTTBs that are JUST off the track and you would never have known that this horse ONLY knew to just run the first 5 years of his/her life. Course, I've also known the OTTB that you HATED to go riding with becuase he was SURE to freak out the minute you walked past him. So they can go either way.

If you go to look at one, be sure to have your trainer with you to ride him too.

Good Luck!
     
    02-10-2010, 12:31 PM
  #10
Green Broke
My first horse was a TB, he never raced, he was 8 when we bought him. I was 9, and he was one of the quietest horses I've ever met. He was born and raised at the race track, but he was to slow(haha) so the trainer boght him, thn me n my mom bought him. He was the pefect horse, never did anything REALLY wrong. I personally LOVE throughbreds, like others have said, I find them to be exteremely brave and smart. I sold him to a mom and daughter who had just began riding, he is loving his new home and they are loving him!

Some thorougbreds are perfect for beginners,some arent. It all depends on the horse. My new hrose is hanoverian/thoroughbred... she's not a beginners horse, haha and she's only half thoroughbred.
     

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