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Thoroughbred

This is a discussion on Thoroughbred within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

     
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        02-10-2010, 01:54 PM
      #11
    Showing
    For a first horse? Probably not a great idea.

    They can be fiery, especially if they've been a successful racehorse. They need that edge to be able to compete and win.

    However, not all of them want to race, and those are the ones who usually make the best all-around horses. I have one of those. His attitude is, "We'll get there eventually, so why run?"

    They tend to be harder keepers than some breeds, which means they're not for someone who has no clue how to properly feed one. Even for my easy keepers I'm continuously changing things around depending on the weather, whether or not the horse is in work, and what they need nutritionally to keep them in good shape.

    They can also have feet problems, which means instead of barefoot trimming, many of them need shoes all the way around to stay sound. Nothing wrong with that, but it is more expensive than just trimming every 6-8 weeks.

    TBs, especially ones off the track, aren't expensive to buy but they can be expensive to maintain properly.
         
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        02-10-2010, 02:23 PM
      #12
    Green Broke
    All of my horses are TB's... I personally love them. My gelding Bishop is my barns schoolmaster, and my mare Love Story is the best showjumper I've ever had. I wouldnt reccomend them as a first horse, because they can be a bit spooky... but I love them
         
        02-10-2010, 03:09 PM
      #13
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
    For a first horse? Probably not a great idea.

    They can be fiery, especially if they've been a successful racehorse. They need that edge to be able to compete and win.

    However, not all of them want to race, and those are the ones who usually make the best all-around horses. I have one of those. His attitude is, "We'll get there eventually, so why run?"

    They tend to be harder keepers than some breeds, which means they're not for someone who has no clue how to properly feed one. Even for my easy keepers I'm continuously changing things around depending on the weather, whether or not the horse is in work, and what they need nutritionally to keep them in good shape.

    They can also have feet problems, which means instead of barefoot trimming, many of them need shoes all the way around to stay sound. Nothing wrong with that, but it is more expensive than just trimming every 6-8 weeks.

    TBs, especially ones off the track, aren't expensive to buy but they can be expensive to maintain properly.
    That is our Aero to a T, lol. She is the most unmotivated horse I have ever had - which is why she has been so good for my daughter. My initial reaction to the suggestion that we consider her (when we went to look at another horse the person had) was, "Uh, NO!", but once we tried her I realized she was not at all what the perception I had of a TB/OTTB. Knowing her now, I can see why she was not successful on the track and came to be available as she was, lol.
         
        02-10-2010, 04:34 PM
      #14
    Foal
    From my experiance they can go from one extreme to the other one TBx I know is a 'hot horse' but really hardy, never goes lame etc on the other hand I have known TB in the past that go lame and drop weight at the drop of a hat! Just down to individual
         
        02-10-2010, 04:45 PM
      #15
    Trained
    I used to have a grey TB named Hunter and he was spastic, crazy, psychopathic, disturbed horse and the best **** jumper I ever owned. He was my best friend for life, and I still get to see him every now and then at Toni's place.

    But then again, I also had a little TB mare named Boony and she was sweet, gentle, calm, and the most amazing kids horse. It all depend son what you want. Boony couldn't jump well to save her life, but she had heart.

    TB's vary depending on what you want. There are exceptions to every rule. I myself wouldn't buy a TB merely because they aren't built for the kind of riding I want to do. I do a little hunter jumper and hunter under saddle but I can do all that with my paints and QH's.

    They can be anything from crazy to calm, psycho to sane, or....well, Hunter to Boony!

    I personally adore TB's. If I was to move up into any advanced level of jumping I would probably go and buy or lease one. But if you're going to do less competitive things I wouldn't bother going the extra mile if you find another hrose that is less expensive with just as much talent.

    And from my experience at Toni and Miranda's places, TB's are harder to keep than others. Annie is part TB and she's incredibly hard to keep weight on. Hunter and Boony weren't terrible, but they definitely took more food than the QH's.
         
        02-10-2010, 04:52 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    SOME TBs are hotter and more difficult and are harder keepers than 'average", but it can be a very individual thing.

    The "hotness" of some Thoroughbreds is directly related to how they are fed, conditioned, and kept. They are SUPPOSED to have alot of energy and drive to run while they are being raced, and they are fed and kept accordingly.

    I bought my first TB gelding right off the track, uninjured and racing fit, and he was a handful for around 60 days, until his energy levels from the type of feed and conditioning he had been maintainted at/with came down to the levels of an "average" pasture kept trail riding/pleasure horse, and he adjusted to different surroundings and activities. When I say "handful" and "adjusted" its not like he was wild and got quiet--he was ALWAYS very well mannered from day one, but just had alot of "go" and was super-aware of things that first 60 days, (like different colored tar on the road, LOL)......after his let down/adjustment period, he was less concerned with changes and less energetic.

    So, once he was adjusted to normal levels of grain, free pasture access, no more breezing/galloping workouts, and etc., he was no harder to deal with than any other horse. He still had "go" when I asked him for it, but was no longer driven to be ALWAYS going. He was not an easy keeper, but was not a particulaerly hard keeper either.

    The main issue we had to work through was his right lead. He had been raced for several years and he ran "around the turn"-- meaning he was never asked to take the right lead, and when turning was always on the left lead... so that took some time and training.

    I have owned and currently own TB mares-- some straight off the track, a couple already broodmares-- and I have not found them to be hard keepers as compared to other horses of similar size and age. Currently my three TB mares (2 established broodmares, one came off the track in October) are unblanketed outside 24/7 with a round bale and minimal grain and are doing great in the cold snowy MI winter.

    None of the TBs I have owned were particularly expensive to buy (and a couple were free) but I got them knowing they would need re-training for whatever discipline I wanted to do with them, and in some cases they needed time off and/or re-habilitating from an injury.
         
        02-10-2010, 04:53 PM
      #17
    Foal
    I've owned my OTTB for about 9 years now. He's almost 15. Had an unsuccessful racing career, and is full of beans, but he's a sweet horse and a lot of fun. We've done jumping, hunter paces, and now we're at a dressage barn so ... guess what? ... he's surprising everyone with his lovely dressage moves. He's never been sick, can go barefoot if he's not on a lot of hard surfaces, and is all around a pretty easy keeper. (Can't skimp on the food, but if he's warm -- 2 blankets in the winter -- and well fed, he's fine.) He's very smart and can/is willing to learn anything. I've had a number of horses along the way, and I would say to look for a horse that has a good heart. My OTTB takes very good care of me, always gives his best effort, and generally gives me the benefit of the doubt. That's all worth $20k in my book!
         
        02-10-2010, 07:10 PM
      #18
    Trained
    The thing with TB's is that they are bred to be high-performance athletes. Little thought is given to life after the track - So things like bad feet, hard keepers, think skin, thin coats, sensitivity etc. get overlooked in favour of speed, heart and athletiticism. They aren't issues when at the track - they are shod, stabled, fed massive amounts of high starch and high sugar feeds, kept in optimal fitness, monitered daily for injury, etc.

    Because of their intended purpose - It is hard for them to adjust to life as a 'horse' instead of an athlete. Their motabolism is designed to digest large amounts of energy - When you take that away and expect them to live on pasture, some take a while to adjust, some never do.

    Feet that are used to being shod are too soft to go barefoot without a long transition - Bodies that are designed to be at maximum fitness and not carry any excess weight struggle to stay balanced.

    Of course, there are always exceptions - But the breed itself is designed as a high performance athlete, so easy keeper TB's are only exceptions - not the norm.

    I personally wouldn't buy a TB because of that reason - I stick with breeds that are designed to be tough, hardy and self sufficient. Of course there are exceptions there are well - but my chances of having an easy to keep horse are much higher.
         
        02-10-2010, 07:20 PM
      #19
    Foal
    My sister owns a Thoroughbred and I own a Quarter Horse. We have definitely experienced more injuries, ect. With our Thoroughbred. That is absolutly no reason that you should not look at a Thoroughbred. There are amazing tbs out there that don't have these problems. A lot of Thoroughbreds are know to have these problems that you talk about because many of them raced before becoming riding horses. Thoroughbreds are cold blooded and they have a tendency to be higher strong then other breeds like the quarter horse. If you are a beginner and/or looking for a first horse thoroughbreds are not always the best, but this doesn't mean that there isn't a Thoroughbred out there for you if you look hard enough :)
         
        02-10-2010, 07:27 PM
      #20
    Foal
    TBs are amasing horses, very energetic and smart. I have a paint TB Mare. The only problem I have with her is that she has REALLY high withers. Other then that iv never had a problem with them.
         

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