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  • Cold tolerance in thoroughbreds
  • Why warm bloods more popular show jumping than thoroughbreds

 
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    02-10-2010, 06:29 PM
  #21
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Five Furlongs    
Thoroughbreds are cold blooded
There is no science to back that statement, all Animals have warm-blood, if anything colloquially they are known as "hot-blooded" horses.
     
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    02-10-2010, 09:25 PM
  #22
Chat Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Void    
There is no science to back that statement, all Animals have warm-blood, if anything colloquially they are known as "hot-blooded" horses.
What they are referring to is them being hot blooded and having a thin skin to handle the heat better. And that is very useful for a high energy athletes that lives in a heated barn as nice as some houses. But this makes them have a very poor cold tolerance. In my home state of Kentucky, I have even seen trailer loads of racehorses headed to Florida for the winter and there are races do there too.
     
    02-10-2010, 09:39 PM
  #23
Banned
I love my TB. I wasn't looking for any breed in particular in a first horse, but he was just what I happened to come upon and I liked him enough to buy him. He is a hard keeper, but I think if he were on pasture instead of a dry lot, he'd keep well enough in addition to everything else we feed him (five flakes, and between 6-8 quarts feed) He is a handful on the ground, he has a HORRIBLE attitude and loves to be testy, but under saddle he is perfect. He is so willing and attentive to try just about everything. But, he is very unsure of himself. He doesn't like do do things the first time, and then after that he goes on with it like a pro. He is also more sensitive than other horses I've ridden, which I guess is a good thing because he's taught me how to lighten myself up and use my seat/legs more efficiently.
     
    02-10-2010, 09:40 PM
  #24
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kentucky    
What they are referring to is them being hot blooded and having a thin skin to handle the heat better. And that is very useful for a high energy athletes that lives in a heated barn as nice as some houses. But this makes them have a very poor cold tolerance. In my home state of Kentucky, I have even seen trailer loads of racehorses headed to Florida for the winter and there are races do there too.
They said the horse was "Cold-Blooded" which is colloquial because all animals have warmblood, I was just saying they are WRONG, because colloquially TBs are "Hot-Bloods"
     
    02-10-2010, 10:33 PM
  #25
Foal
My first owned horse is a 6 yr old ottb. We are both still learning but vint takes care of me just as I take care of her. We went to the royal were she behaved like a pro, she had a bad experiance with a farrier but she has put her trust in us again. She is my rockstar. She isn't hot at all. When I first got shelot some wieght and they can be hard to put weight on but Vint has gained her weight back and looks great! She has a wider foot from the track I don't remember what it's called but it will be fixed with a season of normal shoes. She is perfectly sound. Tb's are a great breed you just have to find the one that suits you.
     
    02-11-2010, 12:48 AM
  #26
Weanling
IMO, you need to look for a horse that's going to be the best fit for you - breed should be of little importance. Your first horse is a BIG DEAL; it needs to be one that is versatile enough to try several disciplines while you figure out what you like best, it needs to be more experienced than you, genuine, fairly spook-proof, forgiving, and SOUND. You can find that within any breed! :)
FWIW, thoroughbreds are lovely; you can get them for under $1000 (but onlyyyyy if you have the expertise!!! Don't get a straight OTTB for your first horse!), and if you buy carefully, they're sound. I have yet to meet a "crazy" or very high energy TB - they've all been reasonably mellow. Perhaps the hyper stereotype is fed into by people who are a little afraid of TBs and the horses feed off of that - thus creating this high level of energy? :)
     
    02-12-2010, 12:27 AM
  #27
Foal
I can't say that a thoroughbred would cost anymore than another breed. I think the price really depends on the breeding. I did have a friend that owned a thoroughbred retired from the track that was in great health the first three years she had him. Then he ended up having back problems causing him to crossfire, and he was only 7 or 8 years old. If your planning on buying one, I'd just suguest you look for a breeder that breeds for quality bone structure etc. Like how some dog breeders breed to eleminate hip displasia in breeds where it is common. Don't know if any thoroughbred breeder in the US actually does this, but just might be someone out there.
     
    02-12-2010, 02:11 PM
  #28
Weanling
They are one of the most popular breeds, and I wouldn't say they are more expensive to purchase than any other horse. Cost is relative to the age/training/conformation/ability. Whether or not it's a TB would be the last thing to consider in pricing. Upkeep always varies from horse to horse.

My friend got an ex-steeple chase racehorse that we both trained together. That horse was jumping 5 feet with her, which worked out perfectly for my friend.

He was hard to put weight on, and he was high energy, but he wasn't mean, and he was a great ride for those who knew what they were doing.

I'm planning on getting a TB off the track myself!
     
    02-12-2010, 03:04 PM
  #29
Foal
Thoroughbreds are amazing horses. They are personally my favorite breed (I am a show jumper/eventer) Yes some are quite hot, so they can be a handful at times. Many have a great work ethic and they are one of the most athletic breeds you can find. Most are fine built so they are susceptible to injury especially when racing due to the intense amount of concussion on the joints. Many young ones that are raced buck their shins so they are pin fired. Thoroughbreds, in capable hands, are excellent riding horses. They are highly capable of jumping due to their extreme athleticism. They are just like other breed, we can't judge them just by breed but by individual personalities of the horse you want to look at.
     
    02-13-2010, 08:00 AM
  #30
Weanling
I would have to agree with the statement that they are more expensive to keep. Within months of owning my first OTTB I was already paying the farrier and vet bills, as well as not riding as nearly as much as I had expected. Also, once she got some weight on her (she was very thin when I got her) she turned into a whole different horse personality wise. I ended up having to sell her because she got so nasty, and her personality still hasn't improved (she is boarded where I work so I still see her). I work at a barn that has predominately TB's, and honestly, there always seems to be something wrong with at least one of them.

They are great jumpers though, and I am sure that there are always exceptions.
     

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