Thoroughbred info!
 
 

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Thoroughbred info!

This is a discussion on Thoroughbred info! within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
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    02-12-2008, 10:21 AM
  #1
Foal
Thoroughbred info!

Hello everyone!
I justed wanted to know some of the characteristics of warmbloods? My aunt wants to give me a warmblood filly. But I said wanted to wait till I get more experienced. So in the meantime, I want to learn as much as I can about them.
Anything else you'd like to say is most welcome!!
Thanks
Jasper
     
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    02-12-2008, 10:26 AM
  #2
Started
What breed of warmblood?
     
    02-12-2008, 11:48 AM
  #3
Showing
- slow growers - don't even think about starting them tull they're 3 or 4
- mind doesn't fully mature till 7 or 8... or later :P
- great for English disciplines, but aren't necessarily built for absolutely everything
- great market for them right now, especially tall ones
- registration makes a difference in price - we almost expect to have papers on it


What breed? How tall are the parents? What does she look like?
     
    02-12-2008, 06:19 PM
  #4
Foal
There are exceptions to everything I am about to say, but:

I consider warmbloods to be the most athletic of all breeds. Most are very well built, strong horses. They are generally very good movers, and many of them have exceptional movement. Because of their build, they have a lot of natural impulsion. They have incredible stamina and most have a natural desire to work. They are versatile horses who excel in most english disciplines, especially dressage and jumping.

Most of them have a strong competitive drive, and they can be a bit egotistic. Although they may be a bit difficult, challenging, or stubborn, they are dynamic in the show ring. I consider them to be very loyal and smart. They are quick learners who like to be challenged. They actually tend to get slower and "stickier" (for lack of a better word) when they are high.

Characteristics vary from breed to breed and of course each horse is different. A good way to judge the potential behavior of the filly would be to look at her mother.
     
    02-12-2008, 07:52 PM
  #5
Trained
Warmbloods are fantastic horses and im not just saying that because I have one lol (thats him in my avatar). To describe him I would say: independent, stubborn, playful, demanding, stubborn, gentle, pushy, beautiful fluid movements and a great heart for jumping, loyal and stubborn lol he is a very interesting horse and all the warmbloods I have ever met are full of personality and usually charisma :) they will try and be your boss but they usually arent aggressive about this. They just try it on cause theyre huge and they think that's enough to get it over you :) but they have heaps of heart and love to give

Even through all this though they are quick learners and are usually very eager to please. Although they can be a little lazy at times but usually not when there is a crowd lol they are on their best behaviour then :)
     
    02-13-2008, 04:58 PM
  #6
Foal
I am also a Warmblood fan I have a Dutch Warmblood mare and I would describe her as: stubborn, very intelligent, honest, very willing to please and not a bad bone in her body :) Her forte is Dressage, and I do have dressage lessons on her and you can see it in her face that she is enjoying it! Her paces feel like she is floating and she has a big, bold canter :) She also jumps, and she is very bold and scopey over fences, she doesn't need any encouragement to jump them, but she doesn't rush or get silly. She is not a typical mare, but she can be stubborn. But as soon as she knows that you aren't going to let her walk all over you, she is your best friend! But you also have to respect her too! If you are forceful with her, then she will be forceful with you too!! Riding wise, she is gorgeous!! She has never bucked, reared or bolted with me, she would never dream of it!! That is her in my avatar!

Here is a better pic of her:


And a ridden one - mom decided she would chop my head off lol
     
    02-14-2008, 05:42 AM
  #7
Foal
Actually a thoroughbred

I'm really sorry to tell you this. But I e mailed my aunt to find out more info on the warmblood because It was my dad who conveyed the information to me... And she said that my dad had got it wrong and that the warmblood filly was a completely different horse. :(
Thd horse she wants to give me is actually a thoroughbred. He's a chestnut gelding, huge and could probably jump over a house. . But she also said he's not for beginners... any wauy. Extra info on tb's would also be welcome. Sorry for the wrong question

Green jasper
     
    02-14-2008, 02:08 PM
  #8
Foal
Thoroughbreds are great, but they definitely aren't for beginner riders.

They tend to be a little more hot-headed and sensitive. They respond to the lightest touch, which is a double edged sword because they are incredibly responsive to your aids but also can hear a leaf crunch from a mile away and think it's going to eat them. They have a finer build than warmbloods, with smaller bones, more refined skinned, long thin legs, necks, and heads, and thin skin. Thin skin is nice because they cool down more quickly after a work out, but they are also more sensitive to flies and other irritants.

They are loyal horses with big hearts. The same competitive, driven, and athletic abilities that make them good racers also make them great jumpers and dressage horses, but especially jumping. They like a challenge.

They tend to be faster horses, with springy trots and big canters. They respond to the lightest touch, for better or for worse.

I have a thoroughbred mare that we got off the track at the age of 5 and turned into a hunter/equitation show horse. She gorgeous and flashy mover. She's a bit flighty and overly responsive to noises, which makes her a horse for experienced riders even at her current age of 19. My mom and I had to really earn her trust. But once you get it, it's harder to lose.

For riders with experience, thoroughbreds are amazing. When I can afford my own horse in the next few years, I will be looking for an off the track thoroughbred.
     
    02-14-2008, 02:38 PM
  #9
Foal
Aww, c'mon.
I have a Off the track TB that is amazing for beginners. He is soo calm & gentle.
My non riding family enjoys riding him..
I've met lotsa TB's that're calm & gentle, and perfectly fine for beginners.
It's not really fair to say "They're great, but not for beginners."

Quote:
Originally Posted by regardinghorses
Thoroughbreds are great, but they definitely aren't for beginner riders.

They tend to be a little more hot-headed and sensitive. They respond to the lightest touch, which is a double edged sword because they are incredibly responsive to your aids but also can hear a leaf crunch from a mile away and think it's going to eat them. They have a finer build than warmbloods, with smaller bones, more refined skinned, long thin legs, necks, and heads, and thin skin. Thin skin is nice because they cool down more quickly after a work out, but they are also more sensitive to flies and other irritants.

They are loyal horses with big hearts. The same competitive, driven, and athletic abilities that make them good racers also make them great jumpers and dressage horses, but especially jumping. They like a challenge.

They tend to be faster horses, with springy trots and big canters. They respond to the lightest touch, for better or for worse.

I have a thoroughbred mare that we got off the track at the age of 5 and turned into a hunter/equitation show horse. She gorgeous and flashy mover. She's a bit flighty and overly responsive to noises, which makes her a horse for experienced riders even at her current age of 19. My mom and I had to really earn her trust. But once you get it, it's harder to lose.

For riders with experience, thoroughbreds are amazing. When I can afford my own horse in the next few years, I will be looking for an off the track thoroughbred.
     
    02-14-2008, 02:52 PM
  #10
Foal
You're right AngelGurl, there are some that are gentle and good for beginners. We're talking general characteristics here, so that doesn't mean that every thoroughbred is only for advanced riders.

However, I've had pretty extensive experience working with thoroughbreds, and only one out of at least 15 was suitable for beginners. Even the one tb I know was more difficult to work with when she was young; she's now 23. They aren't necessarily crazy or anything, they can just be a little bit more difficult to work with.

If you are a more beginning rider, you still need to be very careful when looking to get a tb to make sure you can handle it. This is true for any breed, though. It's always a good idea to do a trial period with the horse if you can. That way you have some time to work with the horse and decide if the two of you are compatible and are at the same ability level. That doesn't mean to avoid a horse that will challenge you. I'm a firm believer that you need to be challenged to learn. You just have to make sure you don't put yourself in a dangerous situation on a horse that is too much for you.
     

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