What can you tell me about Standardbreds?
   

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What can you tell me about Standardbreds?

This is a discussion on What can you tell me about Standardbreds? within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Standardbred road horse
  • Standardbred breed problems

 
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    01-29-2008, 11:22 PM
  #1
Started
What can you tell me about Standardbreds?

I have wanted a Standardbred Road horse since I was eight. As I have just now started an earnest search, it seems that Trotters are extremely hard to find(at least on the general classified sites). I have finally found one who is Pacing bred, but likes to trot, that dad liked so much that he called about.

He is very beautiful, has promising conformation from the photos, and...did I mention he was beautiful???

The only standardbred I have ever been around was a big hammer headed ugly thing that we rescued from a frozen pond a couple weeks ago. He was very sweet, and actually incredibly cute for being so ugly(not saying standardbreds are ugly, just this one), and even though he was almost gone, managed to muster up enough drive to get himself to shore(after darn near half an hour). He did one thing that I thought was just adorable that I have seen many STB road horses on the KY circuit do, and that is Lip Flapping. Too cute. I love it.

So Standardbred people, tell me some stories, and all about your standardbreds. Positives and negatives from personal experiences are greatly welcome.
     
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    01-30-2008, 12:44 AM
  #2
Trained
Ive had a fair bit to do with them. My dad used to breed and train pacers and I now have one old fella of my own. They are absolutely beautiful horses. All the ones that I have come across have been so sweet and gentle and loyal.

The only thing you need to watch is that a lot of people when trying to sell a stb will tell you it trots nicely as they know that is something that a lot of people are concerned about as getting a pacer out of pacing is very difficult. Not impossible but difficult. Even then they can break into a pace any time they feel like it.

Its very rare to get a stb that hasnt been taught to pace but once they learn to trot well they are lovely. Usually very smooth gaited in the trot but not always in the canter. This can be helped with a little work though.

I wouldnt trade my standie for anything...well maybe but it would be hard to part with him :)
     
    01-30-2008, 04:14 AM
  #3
Foal
STB s and russian trotter are really loyal. Eaven when a person hurts them somehow, maby theyr feelings They still are loyal. They give theyr best to do what you want and they feel bad if the fail. You are newer allowed to use forsing with them. *They are too easy to mistreat... :roll:
     
    01-30-2008, 04:50 PM
  #4
Foal
I don't know much about that breed but I found a cool site that has like how it got its name blah blah blah http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/h...bred/index.htm
     
    01-30-2008, 04:54 PM
  #5
Yearling
Ugh! I don't like them. During my search for my first horse I rode an 8yr old standardbred mare and she paced. I hated it! It made me rock sideways violently.
     
    01-30-2008, 11:07 PM
  #6
Started
Well, from what I understand, the horse I am interested in hasn't been worked much on his gaits. He's never been raced, and is broke to ride and drive.

Another thing that would make me against an exracer, is the turns. Going from the track to the ring, they would have to learn not only how to take the turns, but also to keep from pacing or cantering the turns. Pacing the turns will just blow a class.

Man here is what I want.






Here is William Shatner with his Road Horse.
     
    01-31-2008, 04:54 AM
  #7
Trained
It looks like those guys are trotters and you would have much less troubles there but to be honest with you whether you get a pacer or a trotter you will still have some kinds of problems to deal with. Good luck with what you chose. Those guys you have pictured are beautiful :)
     
    01-31-2008, 10:14 PM
  #8
Started
Yes, those are most definitely trotters. Those are Road Horses. They HAVE to be trotters if you are going to do well.

What do you mean problems? Problems with the breed in general? Or problems with the soundness of exracers? I am fully aware of the potential soundness issues coming from OTT STBs.
     
    02-01-2008, 04:29 AM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyDreamer
yes, those are most definitely trotters. Those are Road Horses. They HAVE to be trotters if you are going to do well.

What do you mean problems? Problems with the breed in general? Or problems with the soundness of exracers? I am fully aware of the potential soundness issues coming from ott STBs.
nah I didnt mean soundness stuff. Things like their desire NOT to canter lol they are taught that's its 'naughty' to canter so it can take a while for them to get it all figured out. There will more than likely be things like wanting to go only one way comfortably. But hey, these arent things that are forever problems and can be worked through. Its just something to be aware of :)

P.s. Also stuff like proper carriage and getting them down onto the bit will be hard as their muscle structure is different. Lots of groundwork, lunging with side reins etc should slowly help strengthen the muscles he needs. Slowly and steady :)
     
    02-01-2008, 07:11 PM
  #10
Started
Well, seeing as cantering is something one doesn't want to encourage in a road horse(cantering the turns will kill you in a class just as easily as pacing) it won't matter that much.

And I'm sure getting them to set up the way we would want wouldn't be too much different than training a Fine Harness horse or a Road Pony. We have plenty of experience with Road Ponies, but those are Hackneys. Miserable little creatures.

Just curious but what dicipline do you ride/are you referring to?
     

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