What would be a good starter breed for me?
 
 

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What would be a good starter breed for me?

This is a discussion on What would be a good starter breed for me? within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Best breed of horse for a beginner owners
  • Good beginner horse breeds

 
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    04-09-2011, 08:16 AM
  #1
Foal
What would be a good starter breed for me?

I owned a pony at one time, sadly I had to give him away because he became too much for me to handle Thankfully though he went to a very good seasoned horse owner that is working with him on manners. I know that I need a very calm and patient horse one that is going to bring my confidence level up. And when I am better trained I would love to learn how to barrel race. I just want to know if there is any preferences in the breeds, if there is one that is better suited for a beginner over another? Any advice would help me out a lot.
     
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    04-09-2011, 08:28 AM
  #2
Yearling
There is no breed of horse that can be labeled "beginner/novice friendly". It is the individual horse of any breed who is well-trained and known for it's being a suitable beginner's horse. Best Wishes for a happy horse shopping experience.
     
    04-09-2011, 08:49 AM
  #3
Green Broke
Generally speaking many quarter horses are calm and also known for being good barrel horses too. But like what was said in the post above mine, you really need to look at the individual horse and his training because just like there are calm quarter horses out there, there are also crazy untrained ones that you will find it hard to work with.

You need to be looking for a horse of whatever breed who's well trained and seasoned and marked as beginner friendly. Good luck in your search!
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    04-09-2011, 09:00 AM
  #4
Showing
Welcome to the forum!

As Candandy mentioned, it's more the horse rather then the breed but there are breeds that you will have a better chance with. Those are the stock horse types such as Quarter Horses, Paints, and Appaloosas. The hotter breeds such as the Thoroughbreds or Arabians are not as quiet as a whole even though I've seen many that were perfect as a first horse.

Stepping back a moment, it seems that you are making a mistake. You need to have lessons before buying a horse. You need to not only learn to ride, but to take care of one. It is a terrible mistake to think that you can learn about horses by owning one.
     
    04-09-2011, 09:29 AM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses    
Welcome to the forum!

As Candandy mentioned, it's more the horse rather then the breed but there are breeds that you will have a better chance with. Those are the stock horse types such as Quarter Horses, Paints, and Appaloosas. The hotter breeds such as the Thoroughbreds or Arabians are not as quiet as a whole even though I've seen many that were perfect as a first horse.

Stepping back a moment, it seems that you are making a mistake. You need to have lessons before buying a horse. You need to not only learn to ride, but to take care of one. It is a terrible mistake to think that you can learn about horses by owning one.
I fully recommend iridehorse's second paragraph, also. I should have recognized the need to bring the fact to attention, also.
     
    04-09-2011, 09:36 AM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses    
Welcome to the forum!


Stepping back a moment, it seems that you are making a mistake. You need to have lessons before buying a horse. You need to not only learn to ride, but to take care of one. It is a terrible mistake to think that you can learn about horses by owning one.
Absolutely. Excellent advice... to do otherwise can be dangerous not only for you... but your horse as well.
     
    04-09-2011, 10:04 AM
  #7
Green Broke
Agreeing with the previous posts, I would like to add some thoughts. When looking for a horse, you would probably be better off with an older one, at least 10 years old, that has been rode and worked with for most of that time. They will more likely be settled down and less of a hassle.

Tennessee walkers should also be added to the list of ones to avoid. They too are hot blooded horses.

Instead of buying a horse, you could lease one. That way you are not stuck with the horse or have to sell it if things don't work out.

You would definitely be better off taking lessons before taking on owning a horse. Make sure they include how to handle and work with the horse on the ground and not just riding. If you let the horse get away with things on the ground, the horse will start to try and get away with things when riding. Then you will get frustrated and your confidence level will go down.
     
    04-09-2011, 10:07 AM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by usandpets    
Agreeing with the previous posts, I would like to add some thoughts. When looking for a horse, you would probably be better off with an older one, at least 10 years old, that has been rode and worked with for most of that time. They will more likely be settled down and less of a hassle.

Tennessee walkers should also be added to the list of ones to avoid. They too are hot blooded horses.

Instead of buying a horse, you could lease one. That way you are not stuck with the horse or have to sell it if things don't work out.

You would definitely be better off taking lessons before taking on owning a horse. Make sure they include how to handle and work with the horse on the ground and not just riding. If you let the horse get away with things on the
Ground, the horse will start to try and get away with things when riding. Then you will get frustrated and your confidence level will go down.

I fully agree with all of the previousnposts. Get good and ready, plus confidant and ride gentle lesson horses till you are ready to take on your own.
     
    04-09-2011, 10:10 AM
  #9
Foal
I agree with all of the posts above, since when you try out the horse it might not be perfect so getting a horse to learn how to ride isn’t the best idea, leasing would be good, so that if you can’t handle the horse it’s not as big of a loss as owning a horse would be.
     
    04-09-2011, 10:29 AM
  #10
Trained
In addition to what others have said I would like to add that the best breed for a beginner is OLD. The best color is OLD. The best gender is OLD. Look for well broke horses 15 -20 years old. They may not last for years and years but they won't change much either. If someone tries to sell you a well brike 4 year old politely decline. It may, in fact, be well broke but it is not seasoned enough to put up with the mistakes of a novice without becoming spoiled.
     

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