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Whats so bad about a mustang

This is a discussion on Whats so bad about a mustang within the Horse Breeds forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Whats so bad about the 1971 mustang?
  • Www.horseforum.com/horse-breeds/horse-bDr. Cothran does this testing. He started at Kentucky University and took the test with him to Texas A&M. reed-testing-153832/

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    12-15-2011, 10:24 PM
  #91
Foal
My mustang (born in the holding pen slaughter bound) is the best horse i've ever owned.
     
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    12-15-2011, 10:41 PM
  #92
Trained
I think all horses are good
     
    12-15-2011, 11:24 PM
  #93
Foal
For the most part I agree, however I have did work for a year with a horse that never was"good" everyday was like you had to start over with her, never seen nothin like it. I don't expect to see another like her again.
     
    12-15-2011, 11:27 PM
  #94
Foal
I've hear that sentiment from every person I ever met that had a mustang. I've never personally owned one, but have done alittle ground work with one.
     
    12-15-2011, 11:41 PM
  #95
Yearling
I think it's interesting how some people think they're a whole different breed than the domesticated horses, when really, they're just born in drastically different circumstances.
And I just love reading these posts, because my 12 year old sister is convinced the BLM is out to murder horrifically every mustang out there... She tells me 'true' stories about mustangs caught by the BLM that were left in a pen with no food and water for weeks and then were killed by a bear, and a bunch of other stuff, and how they run the horses to death with the helicopters... I have no idea where she gets these things, but hey, she's at the romantic age of 12, haha.

I do have a question, though- Is it true that a lot of ranchers let their horses out on the range, to join the mustang herds (for good)? Because I read something in a magazine that was saying that real mustangs are practically non-existent, because of all the ranch horses let out that join the herds/breed...
     
    12-16-2011, 12:01 AM
  #96
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsonsky    
1. I NEVER said they should not be rounded up.
2. I'd love to hear who you feel should get the land that the horses live on. Are you suggesting that the government sell off public lands to private owners who are then likely to push the horses out even more?

I'm curious here...
1. And I never said you did say that.
2. Hmm. Let's see.
Who ever needs it?
Everything is balanced out as best as they can. It's a hard thing to do.
(from the BLM site)

Myth #3: Since 1971, the BLM has illegally or improperly taken away more than 20 million acres set aside for wild horses and burros (from 53.8 million acres to 31.6 million acres).

Fact: This claim is false. No specific amount of acreage was “set aside” for the exclusive use of wild horses and burros under the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. The Act directed the BLM to determine the areas where horses and burros were found roaming, and then to manage the animals within the boundaries of those areas. Of the 22.2 million acres no longer managed for wild horse and burro use:


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6.7 million acres were never under BLM management.
Of the 15.5 million other acres of land under BLM management:
48.6 percent (7,522,100 acres) were intermingled ("checkerboard") land ownerships or areas where water was not owned or controlled by the BLM, which made management infeasible;
13.5 percent (2,091,709 acres) were lands transferred out of the BLM's ownership to other agencies, both Federal and state through legislation or exchange;
10.6 percent (1,645,758 acres) were lands where there were substantial conflicts with other resource values;
9.7 percent (1,512,179 acres) were lands removed from wild horse and burro use through court decisions; urban expansion; highway fencing (causing habitat fragmentation); and land withdrawals;
9.6 percent (1,485,068 acres) were lands where no BLM animals were present at the time of the passage of the 1971 Act or places where all animals were claimed as private property. These lands in future land-use plans will be subtracted from the BLM totals as they should never have been designated as lands where herds were found roaming; and
8.0 percent (1,240,894 acres) were lands where a critical habitat component (such as winter range) was missing, making the land unsuitable for wild horse and burro use, or areas that had too few animals to allow for effective management.
The data above is current as of July 25, 2011.

Myth #4: The BLM is managing wild horse herds to extinction.
Fact: This charge is patently false. The current on-the-range population of wild horses and burros (approximately 38,500) is greater than the number found roaming in 1971 (about 25,300). The BLM is seeking to achieve the appropriate management level of 26,600 wild horses and burros on Western public rangelands, or nearly 12,000 fewer than the current West-wide population. The BLM also actively monitors the genetics of each herd by sending genetic samples to Dr. Gus Cothran at Texas A&M University. Dr. Cothran furnishes the BLM a report on every sample with recommendations for specific herds.
Myth #5: The BLM removes wild horses to make room for more cattle grazing on public rangelands.

Fact: This claim is totally false. The removal of wild horses and burros from public rangelands is carried out to ensure rangeland health, in accordance with land-use plans that are developed in an open, public process. These land-use plans are the means by which the BLM carries out its core mission, which is to manage the land for multiple uses while protecting the land’s resources. Livestock grazing on BLM-managed land has declined by more than 30 percent since 1971 -- from 12.1 million Animal Unit Months (AUMs or forage units) to 8.2 million AUMs in 2010.
     
    12-16-2011, 12:02 AM
  #97
Green Broke
Lol, copy and pasting FAIL on my part.
     
    12-16-2011, 12:08 PM
  #98
Started
Yeah I know all about how the BLM handles the land "allocated" to the mustangs. The blm, however DOES lease out much of the land to ranchers who then summarily push the horses off because they don't want to share the food/water with the horses when they feel they've paid for it to be used for their cattle. Does this happen in every instance? I'm sure not. But it DOES happen and it IS something that bothers me. Not to mention the people that buy homes in these new(er) housing developments that were built on land that the horses found food, water and shelter at. Then they bitch and moan that "the horses are ruining my lawn" or "eating my flower beds", etc. in fact I had someone say that to me 2 weekends ago. Argh!!

At any rate, I see the mustangs at the blm every day. I'm pretty clear of what happens with them and if I could i'd adopt a few. There are currently two at home already + three BLM burros. They're all unique and each have there pros and cons just like a "regular" domestic horse.
     
    12-16-2011, 12:12 PM
  #99
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by soenjer55    

I do have a question, though- Is it true that a lot of ranchers let their horses out on the range, to join the mustang herds (for good)? Because I read something in a magazine that was saying that real mustangs are practically non-existent, because of all the ranch horses let out that join the herds/breed...

I don't know of anyone that does it anymore. That was what my grandpa did. But that was when the government wasn't involved with managing the herds. The ranchers or "Mustangers" would cull them out and turn their broodmares out with them.
     
    12-16-2011, 12:23 PM
  #100
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsonsky    
yeah I know all about how the BLM handles the land "allocated" to the mustangs. The blm, however DOES lease out much of the land to ranchers who then summarily push the horses off because they don't want to share the food/water with the horses when they feel they've paid for it to be used for their cattle. Does this happen in every instance? I'm sure not. But it DOES happen and it IS something that bothers me.
You living in Nevada yourself know that it requires a lot of land to maintain an AU. A horse AU is 50% more can a cow/calf pair. That is a lot of land to maintain one horse. Also horses are a hell of a lot tougher on the grass than cattle are. Horses tear the grass out by the roots rather than chewing it off like cattle. I would be a little irritated as well if I had a lease that the horses were tearing up while my cows are hunting grass. The growing season is short and its nice to save a little for dry winter feed.
     

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