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Whats so bad about a mustang

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  • how can you tell horses have bad confirmation ?
  • Mustang horses bad

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    09-18-2011, 04:47 AM
  #21
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faceman    

I also respectfully disagree that they "do better when reunited with the species that initially brought them here". On what do you base that? While it is true that parasite control lengthens the natural lifespan of all horses, the same could be said of any grazing animal. Personally, I am of the opinion that Mustangs, as with all wild animals, are most content being left alone.

That doesn't mean I oppose capturing and taming Mustangs, or oppose people that own them. But it is, in my opinion, rather far fetched to say an animal is better off confined and used as a beast of burden than running wild to pursue its instincts, which is what brings it contentment...
hmm as someone who has ex wild horses, id say they are the happiest domestic horses I've ever met. First to the barn last to want to leave. They line up for their blankets in the rain and eat anything never turning there nose to any type of food.

Sure intially it may be stressful for them but after that they are pretty darn happy.

As far as contentment, I don't think starving in winter, being malnourished, over stocked, competing for territory, worm burdened, and becoming preganant as yearling sounds that fantasti to me, because that the situation for wild horses around theses parts...
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    09-18-2011, 10:46 AM
  #22
Weanling
Well, The one thing that I don't like about them is a lot of them have bad confirmation but they do make great riding and companion horses once trained right
     
    09-18-2011, 11:50 AM
  #23
bjb
Weanling
A lot of ppl who dislike mustang's are mislead or are of a narrow mindset. I know a man who recently told me never to waste my time on mustangs because they aren't worth the work it takes to train them.

I don't agree or even like this man. He just thinks he knows everything about horses and has a "one size fits all" approach to horses.
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    09-18-2011, 01:05 PM
  #24
Showing
Wild or feral, the term doesn't matter. When animals run wild (without man's interference) for generations their suvival tactics are highly developed. This is why it takes people with that special understanding for horses to train one. Ever watch a mustang scale a 6' fence in it's desperation to escape? The early cowboys found that once a mustang was broke out he'd work his heart out for his rider.
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    09-18-2011, 06:03 PM
  #25
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by wild horses    
hmm as someone who has ex wild horses, id say they are the happiest domestic horses I've ever met. First to the barn last to want to leave. They line up for their blankets in the rain and eat anything never turning there nose to any type of food.

Sure intially it may be stressful for them but after that they are pretty darn happy.

As far as contentment, I don't think starving in winter, being malnourished, over stocked, competing for territory, worm burdened, and becoming preganant as yearling sounds that fantasti to me, because that the situation for wild horses around theses parts...
That is your opinion, to which you are entitled. Many people feel the same way. My opinion differs, and mine is based upon fact - that fact being all animals are most content living their lives as they have evolved to live them...whether they are warmer with a blanket, which I also oppose by the way, is not relevant. A cougar or coyote or anteater or whatever that is confined in a 10 X 10 cage and which is provided medical care is far safer and better taken care of than it would be in the wild, and likely has a longer life expectancy, but does that mean it is more content and has lived a more (to it - not to you or I) fullfilling life?

Sorry, but I do not feel it is ever right to take an animal out of the wild unless it is necessary to protect the species from extinction. I fully understand the plight of mustangs and can understand that their removal from the wild can be rationalized, but that in and of itself does not make it right. I also understand that we live in the real world - not some fantasy world - and have to live within a given universe the way it exists, but 2 wrongs do not make a right - never have, and never will. The mustang should be a protected species just as any other wild animal. The fact they are feral, descended from domesticated stock, is not relevant. They are wild at this point in time. Horses are not an introduced species - they are a reintroduced species. Horses are indiginous to North America and in fact evolved here. They belong here, and in simple terms the only reason they became extinct in North America is that early man ate the ones he could catch and chased the ones he couldn't catch to Asia.

I realize that Mustang management is not the topic of this thread, but without going into the sordid specifics we are all well aware of and have beat to death over the years, domesticating wild animals is not and should not be the answer to wildlife management.

Just my opinion - no more or less valid than yours...
     
    09-18-2011, 07:08 PM
  #26
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faceman    
That is your opinion, to which you are entitled. Many people feel the same way. My opinion differs, and mine is based upon fact - that fact being all animals are most content living their lives as they have evolved to live them...whether they are warmer with a blanket, which I also oppose by the way, is not relevant. A cougar or coyote or anteater or whatever that is confined in a 10 X 10 cage and which is provided medical care is far safer and better taken care of than it would be in the wild, and likely has a longer life expectancy, but does that mean it is more content and has lived a more (to it - not to you or I) fullfilling life?

Sorry, but I do not feel it is ever right to take an animal out of the wild unless it is necessary to protect the species from extinction. I fully understand the plight of mustangs and can understand that their removal from the wild can be rationalized, but that in and of itself does not make it right. I also understand that we live in the real world - not some fantasy world - and have to live within a given universe the way it exists, but 2 wrongs do not make a right - never have, and never will. The mustang should be a protected species just as any other wild animal. The fact they are feral, descended from domesticated stock, is not relevant. They are wild at this point in time. Horses are not an introduced species - they are a reintroduced species. Horses are indiginous to North America and in fact evolved here. They belong here, and in simple terms the only reason they became extinct in North America is that early man ate the ones he could catch and chased the ones he couldn't catch to Asia.

I realize that Mustang management is not the topic of this thread, but without going into the sordid specifics we are all well aware of and have beat to death over the years, domesticating wild animals is not and should not be the answer to wildlife management.

Just my opinion - no more or less valid than yours...
Everyone is allowed an opinioin.
The difference is that the Mustang is ferral, not wild. It became ferral, because of the conditions that it's ancestors were forced to survive in. Animals will revert to a ferral state if caste out and no longer taken care of. It doesn't mean they wanted to. The family dog that is caste out will seek someone to care for it, but will do what it can to survive if it's not taken care of by someone. Even humans, if deprived of what they have will do what they need to survive, or die. The offspring of those caste off animals (including humans) that are tough enough, smart enough and lucky enough to survive will grow up learning to survive and resisting what they don't know. That doesn't mean they won't prefer a life where a full belly, no preditors and better health is the norm. I've had ferral animals show up at the farm to get food. If fed they hang around and with a little attention they return to domesticated behavior. Unlike wild animals.

The great mistake that people make is in thinking the a ferral animal becomes truly wild. It's no more true than thinking a few generations of captivity makes a wild animal domestic. Not even a few hundred years is going to undo what it took untold thousands of years to create....the domesticated animal.
     
    09-18-2011, 07:46 PM
  #27
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by its lbs not miles    
Everyone is allowed an opinioin.
The difference is that the Mustang is ferral, not wild. It became ferral, because of the conditions that it's ancestors were forced to survive in. Animals will revert to a ferral state if caste out and no longer taken care of. It doesn't mean they wanted to. The family dog that is caste out will seek someone to care for it, but will do what it can to survive if it's not taken care of by someone. Even humans, if deprived of what they have will do what they need to survive, or die. The offspring of those caste off animals (including humans) that are tough enough, smart enough and lucky enough to survive will grow up learning to survive and resisting what they don't know. That doesn't mean they won't prefer a life where a full belly, no preditors and better health is the norm. I've had ferral animals show up at the farm to get food. If fed they hang around and with a little attention they return to domesticated behavior. Unlike wild animals.

The great mistake that people make is in thinking the a ferral animal becomes truly wild. It's no more true than thinking a few generations of captivity makes a wild animal domestic. Not even a few hundred years is going to undo what it took untold thousands of years to create....the domesticated animal.
No offense is intended, but your post has no basis at all, nor have you read the previous posts. I suggest you look up the definition of feral. For the umpteenth time...FERAL MEANS WILD. To say that feral is not wild is the same as saying wild is not wild - makes no sense. Oh, and by the way, when you look it up, look up "feral" - not "ferral", so you can be sure to find it.

Furthermore, horses were never "forced" to live in the wild. Quite the contrary, horses evolved wild and have been forced to live in captivity. That is somewhat beside the point, of course, because the mustang's ancestors for the most part weren't "forced" into anything - they escaped the loving captivity you seem to treasure, and ran away to live the way they wanted to live. Of course it is true that in later years, many were turned out.

I'm not anti horse ownership - I own horses myself, and have for over 50 years. And I am not anti-mustang. Actually I like mustangs. However, I don't live in a fantasy world where horses prefer captivity to freedom...I live on Earth. I sincerely doubt that if horses could talk, a Mustang roped for capture would kick its heels and holler "Hooray...at last! I've been captured and now I can do what I've always dreamed about - have someone throw 200 pounds on my back, pen me up, feed me what they want to feed me, make me work when I don't feel like it, nail those weights to my feet, and stick me with those nasty needles.

That's not to say some horses come to enjoy human companionship, and almost all horses are able to acclimate to their environment. But to say they would prefer captivity, given the choice, is honestly a bit far fetched...
     
    09-18-2011, 10:12 PM
  #28
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faceman    
That is your opinion, to which you are entitled. Many people feel the same way. My opinion differs, and mine is based upon fact - that fact being all animals are most content living their lives as they have evolved to live them...whether they are warmer with a blanket, which I also oppose by the way, is not relevant. A cougar or coyote or anteater or whatever that is confined in a 10 X 10 cage and which is provided medical care is far safer and better taken care of than it would be in the wild, and likely has a longer life expectancy, but does that mean it is more content and has lived a more (to it - not to you or I) fullfilling life?

Sorry, but I do not feel it is ever right to take an animal out of the wild unless it is necessary to protect the species from extinction. I fully understand the plight of mustangs and can understand that their removal from the wild can be rationalized, but that in and of itself does not make it right. I also understand that we live in the real world - not some fantasy world - and have to live within a given universe the way it exists, but 2 wrongs do not make a right - never have, and never will. The mustang should be a protected species just as any other wild animal. The fact they are feral, descended from domesticated stock, is not relevant. They are wild at this point in time. Horses are not an introduced species - they are a reintroduced species. Horses are indiginous to North America and in fact evolved here. They belong here, and in simple terms the only reason they became extinct in North America is that early man ate the ones he could catch and chased the ones he couldn't catch to Asia.

I realize that Mustang management is not the topic of this thread, but without going into the sordid specifics we are all well aware of and have beat to death over the years, domesticating wild animals is not and should not be the answer to wildlife management.

Just my opinion - no more or less valid than yours...
okay just going to add some more things, mustangs did not evolve where they are now, they were if as you say reintroduced, then it was after the were domesticated and well changed from their original ancestors.

How do you know its a fact that theyare happier in the wild? Did you ask them? Yea im sure that a coyote in a 10x10 cage would be happier wild, bt that's an extreme example. But most people I know who have adopted wild horses keep thm in paddocks, maybe occasionaly stabled. But mosty paddocked. Mine still run in a herd with my domestic horses in a large 30acre paddock, but they get all the bonuses of domestic life to. They seem pretty happy to me, well that what I get from watching their behavior anyway.

You welcome to go look at my blog if you like and see what they arrived looking like from the wild and then form your own opinion about there genreal happiness

www.wildhorseproject.blogspot.com

I do admit that mine came from a situation where they were absolutly not thriving though. Like any breed of horses mustangs can end up in the wrong hands, and be abused neglected, or just dumped in stock yards, and in this case any horse would be happier in the wild. But most end up in loving homes where they are well cared for and seem pretty content.
     
    09-19-2011, 10:46 AM
  #29
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by EthanQ    
Well, The one thing that I don't like about them is a lot of them have bad confirmation but they do make great riding and companion horses once trained right
Mustang's actually have great conformation. Sure, they aren't as heavily muscled as let's say, a QH, but most of them have amazing feet, strong bones and good bodies. There are many horses in the Mustang breed with great conformation, and of course, there is a few that don't. For the most part, they are all "structurally sound" and have little to no conformational faults.:)
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    09-19-2011, 10:55 AM
  #30
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by wild horses    
okay just going to add some more things, mustangs did not evolve where they are now, they were if as you say reintroduced, then it was after the were domesticated and well changed from their original ancestors.

How do you know its a fact that theyare happier in the wild? Did you ask them? Yea im sure that a coyote in a 10x10 cage would be happier wild, bt that's an extreme example. But most people I know who have adopted wild horses keep thm in paddocks, maybe occasionaly stabled. But mosty paddocked. Mine still run in a herd with my domestic horses in a large 30acre paddock, but they get all the bonuses of domestic life to. They seem pretty happy to me, well that what I get from watching their behavior anyway.

You welcome to go look at my blog if you like and see what they arrived looking like from the wild and then form your own opinion about there genreal happiness

www.wildhorseproject.blogspot.com

I do admit that mine came from a situation where they were absolutly not thriving though. Like any breed of horses mustangs can end up in the wrong hands, and be abused neglected, or just dumped in stock yards, and in this case any horse would be happier in the wild. But most end up in loving homes where they are well cared for and seem pretty content.
I did not say or otherwise intimate that mustangs evolved in North America. Please do not put words in my mouth. My statements are clear, specific, and in no need of spin or interpretation.

Your blog is of no interest or concern to me. The amount of information available on mustangs and their situation is endless - some accurate, most biased on one side or another, and the vast majority of it based upon ignorance or emotion - that is not to say yours falls into any of those categories.

The history of mustangs is, at least in this context, irrelevant. What is relevant is that at this point they are wild. As such, they should be managed as any other wildlife, which any reasonable person realizes does not include capture and confinement/domestication. There is no logical basis upon which to make a moral distinction between mustangs and other wild animals. If we extrapolate the philosophy of removing animals from the wild, then we would have no wild animals at all. Perhaps that is what we will come to some day, but I am glad I won't be around when that day comes. We have a glut of domesticated horses right now - so many that thousands are cast off every year. It is not logical or reasonable to capture and tame mustangs to add to an already saturated horse market.

With that being said, of course the politics of the situation is well known, and there is no question that in some instances individual mustangs can be "saved" by intervention. But that is not a solution - it is an undesireable alternative to address an immoral political situation that places individual horses at risk. I certainly don't condemn those who adopt mustangs, but nonetheless it remains a poor alternative that does nothing to address the underlying problem, and it should not be glorified in an attempt to make it something it is not. I think we all know our handling of mustangs has been shameful and rife with political corruption, with little regard for the breed - should you choose to call mustangs a breed. I find it incredibly ironic and pitiful that we go to such great extremes to protect insignifcant local species populations that have no ecological impact whatsoever, yet turn our backs on a significant population such as mustangs, which fill an important ecological niche that was vacant for thousands of years, and in both cases, the conflicting policies are the result of corrupt politics.

Aack - sorry for the rant. The bottom line is I have nothing against adopting mustangs considering current circumstances, but we should all be reminded that it would be far preferable if they could be left alone. After all, despite what the uninformed may think, they are wild animals after all...
     

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