The Wonderful Cob - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 43 Old 07-19-2014, 05:04 PM Thread Starter
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Ahah yeah we bought my boy as a 3yr old for £500! We practically rescued him, maybe they should ship some of the millions of unwanted hairy cobs over to the US and give them some loving homes!
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post #12 of 43 Old 07-19-2014, 05:54 PM
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I would love it if we had cobs over here. I love anything drafty, but I don't really need a 17 hand full draft! Plus, even drafts aren't that common around here. Most of them seem to be a product of the PMU industry in Canada.

The closest I have seen to a cob would probably be my BLM Mustang John. He was only 14.3 but STOCKY and reminded me of a shrunken down Belgian. He had really good bone and quality large feet, something lacking in most Quarter Horses in my opinion. Unfortunately John passed away.

So yeah, ship us some cobs please! I don't even care what color they are.
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post #13 of 43 Old 07-19-2014, 06:06 PM
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The cob was the mainstay of the UK riding school and trekking industry - still is really - because when you get a good one you can put any rider of any size, shape or level of expertise on it and it will cope with it and step up to the mark.
We brought our cob here with us and I've never regretted doing it.
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post #14 of 43 Old 07-19-2014, 07:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shropshirerosie View Post
What in the UK we would describe proudly as a 'Cob' with no breeding papers at all, might here be described (somewhat dismissively) as a 'Grade Horse' ie. A cross breed of unknown origin.
I do this that in the US there are very few horses of cob type that aren't registered (generally speaking). Wheras in the UK it is my impression that a cob is a pretty common (most in some areas?) type of horse. Due to the smaller amount there is more focus on registered individuals.
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post #15 of 43 Old 07-19-2014, 08:42 PM
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To yogiwick: my view (though it may be incorrect, and I look forward to hearing other opinions) is that the 'Registered cobs' in North America are akin to me importing a bunch of similar looking grade horses (making sure all were similar colours or types) to the UK, and pronouncing them to be "Ranch Royals" or "Cowboy Workers" or whatever else made-up name I came up with - and thus creating demand and wealth where there was none.

To clarify - Registered Welsh Sections A to D are not what I would call a Cob - to me, a Cob is a TYPE it's not a registered breed. I might call a Welsh 'cobby', and that would be a compliment because I like good bone, weight, and character.

The UK is indeed full of Cobs and they are all fabulous horses.
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post #16 of 43 Old 07-19-2014, 10:05 PM
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^Yes I agree with you completely.

I was just saying being a rare "super speshul" breed (not hating, follow my point lol) they are less likely to be unregistered (well I guess any rare breed) such as a Fresian. If you're going to bother to spend the money to get one breed one sell one etc you're going to register it. Unregistered Friesians (at least in the states) are rare.

Any breed that has a high market value (for whatever reason) and/or (or because of) a small gene pool is more likely to have a large portion of individuals registered. I would guess most stock horses in the UK are registered. Whereas around here so many grade horses are stock type they're all called QHs lol. It's just flipped!
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post #17 of 43 Old 07-20-2014, 03:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CandyCanes View Post
lol... Over here, gypsy banners are a dime a dozen. We have THOUSANDS of the yokes roaming the streets, in rescue centres, and fly grazing in Dublin city. They are absolutely everywhere. And nobody wants them.
But no-one calls them Gypsy Vanners do they? They are usually just called cobs and yes they are very common and often as cheap as chips. They are useful horses and great weight carries, they can give some good bone to finer breeds and a cob cross would always be my preference.


Welsh Cobs are completely different and only the D usually gets called a cob.

Personally , they are not fast enough for me.
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post #18 of 43 Old 07-20-2014, 12:24 PM
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It used to be that if you bought a cob or a pony off a gypsy it got called by that prefix - almost always black and white or any other colour and white (piebald/skewbald)
Then all of a sudden they have bloodlines yet I knew the now disgraced Tom Price from the auctions, he was hailed as the King of the Gypsy Cobs by some americans yet at one time he'd throw any stallion (usually welsh or arab) in with his mares to get a bit more quality in the heads because then they'd make more money sold to the show market.
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post #19 of 43 Old 07-20-2014, 01:08 PM
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I puffy heart my cobs… I always wanted drafts but, the size was just too much for me. They are as close to perfect (for me) as it gets! ^.^

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post #20 of 43 Old 07-20-2014, 01:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clava View Post
But no-one calls them Gypsy Vanners do they? They are usually just called cobs and yes they are very common and often as cheap as chips. They are useful horses and great weight carries, they can give some good bone to finer breeds and a cob cross would always be my preference.


Welsh Cobs are completely different and only the D usually gets called a cob.

Personally , they are not fast enough for me.
over here, everyone-believe it or not- just calls them "those dreadful coloured things!". Shorten that to "coloured cobs". Tbh, there are FAR too many of them, and as people have no use for them (they do tend to be verrryy heavy) in eventing or dressage etc. The competition person here likes alot of blood in their horses. The travelling community uses them for sulky driving, but even they prefer a finer built horse.

*disclaimer*- I'm not discrediting the gypsy cob. I DO think they are great horses, but all the same, there needs to be fewer, better quality bred ones, suitable for SOMETHING. At the moment, they haven't found their niche amongst the blood horses and ponies.
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