Your warmblood opinion
 
 

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Your warmblood opinion

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    07-31-2013, 04:00 PM
  #1
Foal
Your warmblood opinion

In theory, I like warmbloods. Not so much based on my experiences with them. My trainer works out of a warmblood breeding farm ( mostly Hanoverians) and I have had quite a lot of interaction with these horses. They are pushy, disrespectful and jumpy. One mare wears a shock collar and has been known to take chunks out of people.

I realize that this most likely stems from bad training/experiences, but even so it has turned me off to warmbloods. What are your experiences with these horses? (The good and the bad) have you trained/ridden/owned one before? What was his/her temperament like?

Thanks!
     
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    07-31-2013, 04:12 PM
  #2
Foal
I often ride a friends Oldenburg. He's an 11 y/o gelding, and he does have his attitude. However, he is generally willing to please, and with a firm hand often only needs one or two corrections. He also has a biting habit. Seems to be more of a dominance issue, since he is in the top of his herd. With some quick elbows in the face, and just keeping a look out, his biting is pretty much gone. Now, he has adjusted to a new rider (me) and rarely puts up any qualms. He's one of my favorite horses at the barn. Definitely a personality!
     
    07-31-2013, 04:29 PM
  #3
Weanling
Attitude in horses is 99.9% what us stupid humans teach them, IMO. Has nothing to do with the breed of the horse most times. The odd time a horse does 'have a screw loose', but I don't think that happens too often, eh?

I've dealt with a few warmbloods in the past in a barn that were a pleasure to work with. No vices at all. Same barn had one quarterhorse that cribbed and would pin ears and bite anything and anyone that came within 10 feet of its stall. A different barn where the young OTTB was used to give super nervous people their first riding experience.

All in how you handle them and train them :)
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    07-31-2013, 04:30 PM
  #4
Showing
I have -never- heard of anyone using a shock collar. Are you sure it wasn't a cribbing collar?
Some people joke that warmbloods are "dumb-bloods" because they generally have a lazier nature.
I find warmbloods can kind of be separated into two categories: amateur friendly, and pro quality. The ammy friendly mounts are bred to be "yes ma'am" horses, whereas pro horses have that "fire" that gives them the drive to compete at a higher level; generally these horses are hitter to handle and ride.
Again, this is a generalization.
I've worked with and have owned (and currently own) warmbloods since I started riding.
You will find every type of personality, just as with any other breed. Some are lazy, some are hot, some love to work, others tell you to piss off. I love warmbloods as they're bred for my chosen disciplines.
The first WB I ever owned was ruined by his former owner/trainer and his mind was blown. He did teach me how to sit a buck. My current filly is brave, willing, trusting, and oh so sweet. She has a very trainable mind.
I've ridden and worked with the whole gamut, from sporty and light to those who preferred to sleep.
My heart horse was a WB. He was amazing - jumped the moon, had a lovely extended trot, was light and responsive.. I preferred to ride him with just a halter. He was truly an amazing horse.
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    08-01-2013, 09:45 AM
  #5
Foal
So yes, it comes down to training. I just need to convince my warmblood-ruined mind that these horses just aren't handled well- or are of the pro type that JustDressageIt mentioned. And yes, it's a shock collar. It may double as a cribbing collar and looks just like one, but if she gets nasty you can press one of two buttons on a remote control outside her stall. The first is a warning and the second shocks her. Personally I've never had to use it.
     
    08-01-2013, 10:29 AM
  #6
Showing
That's insane. I'd be willing to bet those horses are the way they are because they've been so mistreated. Poor things.
There's a mare at my barn who is super protective of "her bubble" - she's a total sweetheart though! I couldn't imagine what she (or any horse!!!) would do with a shock collar.
That's disturbing. If you haven't gotten yourself out of that barn yet, do it now.
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    08-01-2013, 10:51 AM
  #7
Foal
Pro-type warmbloods should not be nasty either. I ride out of a small dressage barn where every one of the 18 horses is friendly and can be handled on the ground by any reasonably knowledgeable adult. Some of them have little quirks, but all are basically obedient and pleasant.

When it comes to riding, a pro-type dressage horse is very sensitive to aids and so requires an experienced rider to perform.

I'd agree with EdmontonHorseGirl that the deciding factor is how the animals are treated. These horses are well trained, cared for & fed. They get 12 hour turn-out year round. However, when one of them gets out of line (nipping for treats, door banging etc.) they are quickly disciplined with stern words, maybe a light tap on the muzzle.
     
    08-01-2013, 11:26 AM
  #8
Started
Most warmbloods I've met have had a lot of attitude. However, nearly all of them were overfed and badly spoiled. In fact their attitude generally improved the more I interacted with them because I just didn't accept any of their cr@p. To be honest, I still prefer TBs. They have a lot of "go" but less of the seething explosiveness of a warmblood. With a TB you know what you're going to get, there's something very honest about them, even the ones that are batpoo crazy. Hot (usually overfed) warmbloods I've found can be walking steadily by your side one moment with no signs of antsy-ness, then BOOM, with only a slight change of expression as warning they're leaping around or trying to take off. Just my experience though.
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    08-01-2013, 11:45 AM
  #9
Trained
I like a challenge so I find the warmbloods to be fun. They are a different animal for sure! I have groomed for some really great upper level horses and yeah, quirks is one way to put it :P
Mine now is a pretty easy going fella, great ammy horse and was excellent as a training project up to the I1 but he needs to go teach someone else! I'm on the trail of some great horses, need something with a GP potential so anything that's prone to random outbursts is top of the list :P
They're the most fun just broke ahahaha. I have one 2 year old on the radar who would be a fun project :P

But yeah, different strokes for different folks. I'm a warmbloods person. If the horse bolts, you hold on and don't let go. Some craziness is par for the course!
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    08-01-2013, 11:57 AM
  #10
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
I like a challenge so I find the warmbloods to be fun. They are a different animal for sure! I have groomed for some really great upper level horses and yeah, quirks is one way to put it :P
Mine now is a pretty easy going fella, great ammy horse and was excellent as a training project up to the I1 but he needs to go teach someone else! I'm on the trail of some great horses, need something with a GP potential so anything that's prone to random outbursts is top of the list :P
They're the most fun just broke ahahaha. I have one 2 year old on the radar who would be a fun project :P

But yeah, different strokes for different folks. I'm a warmbloods person. If the horse bolts, you hold on and don't let go. Some craziness is par for the course!
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Anebel, if the number one qualifier is "prone to random outbursts" you're welcome to borrow Brock Although I'm not saying anything about GP talents...or the warmblood pedigree lol. But I can guarantee you he's 100% nuts!

I remember once having a disagreement with my OH (who has worked extensively in TB racing as well as spent a few years preparing warmblood performance horses) over whether racing TBs or performing WBs are more unpredictable. He swore that racing TBs were, but I said that they weren't because you could generally expect them to be nuts, and for the most part their nuttiness involved going as forward and fast as possible. So that is not unpredictable in my books. WBs on the other hand, I argued, you never knew what they were going to throw at you next. You're walking along on or leading a WB, dum-di-da-di-dum-di-da-di-MASSIVE-BUCK-REAR-LEAP-THREE-FEET-IN-THE-AIR-di-dum-di-da-di-dum... Now that's what I consider unpredictable

Both have their place and their merits. I find WBs visually very beautiful and I like their extra bone (although my overall personal preference is Baroque horses). I guess I just prefer TBs because I like to be prepared and have my toothbrush and clean underwear packed for a trip to ER
     

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