50 Shades of Grey (Ha! No really...Pic Heavy!) - Page 2
 
 

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50 Shades of Grey (Ha! No really...Pic Heavy!)

This is a discussion on 50 Shades of Grey (Ha! No really...Pic Heavy!) within the Horse Colors and Genetics forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Heavy pages of fifty shades of grey
  • 50 shades of horse

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    06-13-2012, 04:23 PM
  #11
Yearling
I have no idea what they are, I think it's just like fleabites or dapples, except larger. Greying is an erratic process of all the hairs on the horse changing, so I just chalk it up to those guys being ahead of the rest.
     
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    06-19-2012, 11:29 PM
  #12
Yearling
As promised, here are some updated pics of Holly sporting her more reddish/yellow hue she's decided to take on. These were taken late afternoon, so the glow does add a bit, but mid day in the field she looks just as yellow. Taken today!

And yay for counter shading!



     
    06-22-2012, 01:06 AM
  #13
Yearling
Would she be considered a rose grey, since she has that reddish hue?


AHA! I was just looking at this http://www.thehorseguide.com/HorseColors/Grey.htm --- could the spots be tetrarch spots?
     
    06-22-2012, 01:19 AM
  #14
Yearling
Thirteen, what fascinating photo capture of your beautiful horse, Holly's transitions! Thank you for sharing this. I am just now beginning to teach myself of the genetics of horse coloring, and I find it absolutely engaging.

As well, Soenjer, your Envi is stunning! Her transitions are awesome also.

I read that with Grays, who are the general initiating color for all eventual white horses (in most cases, anyway, per my reading; is that correct?) there is, very sadly, a 70-80% chance of them developing, by about age 15, a NON-malignant form of melanoma, which is curable, and at times may return as a malignant, organ-based carcinoma.

Has this been either of your experiences, owning or working with Grays previously? Does this seem accurate to you?

I found it disappointing and sad, to say the least, and also confusing. Disappointing because, though color is far down on my list of importance when choosing my eventual horse, I would find owning a grey (or one who had turned nearly all white if I bought an older horse beyond the age of eight at which time they have usually completely grayed, per this researcher's commentary, which is likely for my needs) to be a great bonus.

I find the info sad for obvious reasons, but also very curious. If this IS TRUE, then on average, there is the likelihood that approximately only 20-30% of grey/white horses would live well into old age, at least without significant illness/treatment for such being necessary art some point. I would imagine that would be a reason for many breeders and horse owners to avoid this color choice when deciding on their animal?

Any input would be greatly interesting...this particular information was found on a site which Chiilaa had posted for genetic color testing...I printed out all of the information the site provided on basic color facts and homo/heterozygous traits, along with genetic anomalies which breeders screen for and why...I do hope I have properly restated this info which I read re: Grays/cancers...if not, I will reread and quote directly as not to misinform others!

Thank you again for your photos! Any input on the other issues would be wonderful! :0)
     
    06-22-2012, 01:32 AM
  #15
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Back2Horseback    
Thirteen, what fascinating photo capture of your beautiful horse, Holly's transitions! Thank you for sharing this. I am just now beginning to teach myself of the genetics of horse coloring, and I find it absolutely engaging.

As well, Soenjer, your Envi is stunning! Her transitions are awesome also.

I read that with Grays, who are the general initiating color for all eventual white horses (in most cases, anyway, per my reading; is that correct?) there is, very sadly, a 70-80% chance of them developing, by about age 15, a NON-malignant form of melanoma, which is curable, and at times may return as a malignant, organ-based carcinoma.

Has this been either of your experiences, owning or working with Grays previously? Does this seem accurate to you?

I found it disappointing and sad, to say the least, and also confusing. Disappointing because, though color is far down on my list of importance when choosing my eventual horse, I would find owning a grey (or one who had turned nearly all white if I bought an older horse beyond the age of eight at which time they have usually completely grayed, per this researcher's commentary, which is likely for my needs) to be a great bonus.

I find the info sad for obvious reasons, but also very curious. If this IS TRUE, then on average, there is the likelihood that approximately only 20-30% of grey/white horses would live well into old age, at least without significant illness/treatment for such being necessary art some point. I would imagine that would be a reason for many breeders and horse owners to avoid this color choice when deciding on their animal?

Any input would be greatly interesting...this particular information was found on a site which Chiilaa had posted for genetic color testing...I printed out all of the information the site provided on basic color facts and homo/heterozygous traits, along with genetic anomalies which breeders screen for and why...I do hope I have properly restated this info which I read re: Grays/cancers...if not, I will reread and quote directly as not to misinform others!

Thank you again for your photos! Any input on the other issues would be wonderful! :0)
Thank you for the compliment! I'll be sure to relay it to Envi, although I don't think he needs a bigger head, he thinks he's quite the stud already...
Envi is actually the first grey horse I've ever owned, so this is news to me- do you still have the link to the site? Like I've said I've never owned a grey before so I'm not familiar with the specifics of them, and this isn't something I want to ignore. :/
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    06-22-2012, 01:44 AM
  #16
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by soenjer55    
Thank you for the compliment! I'll be sure to relay it to Envi, although I don't think he needs a bigger head, he thinks he's quite the stud already...
Envi is actually the first grey horse I've ever owned, so this is news to me- do you still have the link to the site? Like I've said I've never owned a grey before so I'm not familiar with the specifics of them, and this isn't something I want to ignore. :/
Yes...I hear you...So I can't post a "click on" link because my phone is too confusing (dur!) BUT, this is the website: Animal Genetics, and if you cannot get there from that, the company is called "Animal Genetics Incorporated".

When you get there, go to the Equine dropdown menu and from there, go to the choice "gray". Good luck to you!!
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    06-22-2012, 06:59 AM
  #17
Yearling
Well LOOKIE THERE!! I had NO IDEA that just typing the whole eAddresss would cause a clickable link! I learned even computer skills here at HF tonight! Good news.

I do hope, on a more serious note, that you found the needed info!

Best to y'all! :0)
     
    06-22-2012, 09:00 AM
  #18
Started
My experience hasn't shown the carcinoma theory to be true. I've known many very healthy greys who lived well into their late 20s. They never had any melanoma problems their entire lives. In fact, the only horse I've Known to have a non-malignant melanoma - or anything at all- was a spotted saddle horse, but she lived to 27. She lived with cushing's for close to 10 years, too.
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    06-22-2012, 09:26 AM
  #19
Yearling
Cool! You can see her star again in that first most recent picture. What a fun horse to own. Every time she sheds out is like opening a Christmas present. :) And I love how that one big oval spot is always there, even during her chestnut days. Thanks for sharing these.
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    06-22-2012, 09:45 AM
  #20
Green Broke
Cool pictures, I would love to find out what my grey mare originally looked like.

On the melanoma part. I just had this conversation with my vet last week as he checked my horse for them. The majority of grey horses do have them and you wont even know. They cause no problems unless they are internal on organs or if they are located in an area where tack would sit. Internal melanomas are rare so not something to worry about.

There's one grey at my barn that has a melanoma on his neck. It looks like just a patch of hair is missing like a burn or something. The skin is kinda flaky but that's it, nothing to worry about. And it doesn't look like a lump or anything. We all just thought it was an old injury where hair never came back.

Edit: my mare is 19 and has been declared to be free of any melanomas.
     

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