Brindle Vs. Rain Scalding
   

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Brindle Vs. Rain Scalding

This is a discussion on Brindle Vs. Rain Scalding within the Horse Colors and Genetics forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
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    12-21-2010, 12:33 PM
  #1
Weanling
Brindle Vs. Rain Scalding

I have become very interested in brindle horses since it appears they are becoming more seen and heard of in many different breeds. I have found many different websites that claim to have and breed brindle horses. One of the traits they claim to be related to the "brindle gene" is that the hair comes in different textures, it comes in during the winter time and is called a "seasonal brindle". To me, it looks like just choppy winter hair that's been exposed to the elements. Can someone explain why this is considered a brindle trait? Other than seeing choppy hair I don't see a variation in the colors.

I know one of the effects of rain scald can make a temporary scar that looks like lacing or brindle, could people be confusing the two? Or is there such thing as a seasonal brindle?

BRINDLE HORSE COATS « JUSTA SPLASH OF BRINDLE HORSE FARMS At the bottom you will see the choppy hair I mentioned.

http://www.brindlehorses.com/battyatty/webped/baybe.htm

http://www.brindlehorses.com/battyatty/webped/one.htm

http://www.brindlehorses.com/brinslides/bmule.htm To me, This looks like a side effect of rain scald.
     
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    12-21-2010, 03:25 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by crimson88    
I have become very interested in brindle horses since it appears they are becoming more seen and heard of in many different breeds. I have found many different websites that claim to have and breed brindle horses. One of the traits they claim to be related to the "brindle gene" is that the hair comes in different textures, it comes in during the winter time and is called a "seasonal brindle". To me, it looks like just choppy winter hair that's been exposed to the elements. Can someone explain why this is considered a brindle trait? Other than seeing choppy hair I don't see a variation in the colors.

I know one of the effects of rain scald can make a temporary scar that looks like lacing or brindle, could people be confusing the two? Or is there such thing as a seasonal brindle?

BRINDLE HORSE COATS JUSTA SPLASH OF BRINDLE HORSE FARMS At the bottom you will see the choppy hair I mentioned.

http://www.brindlehorses.com/battyatty/webped/baybe.htm

http://www.brindlehorses.com/battyatty/webped/one.htm

http://www.brindlehorses.com/brinslides/bmule.htm To me, This looks like a side effect of rain scald.

The last one does look like rain scald.
One of our horses had scalding but it was from body fluids from a severe injury.

Honestly I'm not too impressed with those brindles but that is just me. If I were to get a brindle I would want a lot of brindling and not slight.

I would look for brindling like this if you were to get one.
I do hope that I don't come as rude. I know that Piaffe as a brindle arab. You might want to talk to her about brindles. Her horses has a lot of brindling and he doesn't seem to grow that much coat.It's very thin.

Photos Of Brindle Horses
     
    12-21-2010, 03:42 PM
  #3
Banned
The one horse looks like it simply has sweat marks to me.

I do not know much about color genetics and such so I hope someone who truly understands it answers.
     
    12-21-2010, 05:12 PM
  #4
Weanling
No, you don't sound rude, Gidget. The first link I have apperantly is a ranch with the "world's largest herd of brindle horses in history". To me, I honestly think they are trying to find any thing on their horses that might resemble brindle for a marketing thing. Kind of sickening in my eyes, as they must have to make up the color to get people to buy them or whatever. I don't know that for sure, but that's just the impression I get.

Going by their brindle examples, im sure about 50% of the horse population would be considered "brindle". That's why I'm confused to whether it truely is brindle or not. My bay gelding would be considered a "brindle" going by the examples, he has a cowlick on his chest and the surrounding hairs grow in different directions making vertical lines. He certainly not a brindle in anyway though! Im pretty sure the way the hair growes doesn't have anything to do with his color or color genetics!
     
    12-21-2010, 07:40 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by crimson88    
No, you don't sound rude, Gidget. The first link I have apperantly is a ranch with the "world's largest herd of brindle horses in history". To me, I honestly think they are trying to find any thing on their horses that might resemble brindle for a marketing thing. Kind of sickening in my eyes, as they must have to make up the color to get people to buy them or whatever. I don't know that for sure, but that's just the impression I get.

Going by their brindle examples, im sure about 50% of the horse population would be considered "brindle". That's why I'm confused to whether it truely is brindle or not. My bay gelding would be considered a "brindle" going by the examples, he has a cowlick on his chest and the surrounding hairs grow in different directions making vertical lines. He certainly not a brindle in anyway though! Im pretty sure the way the hair growes doesn't have anything to do with his color or color genetics!
I don't think it has anything to do with the way the hair grows

I also find it odd that the coat on the horse would be textured different from what I am understanding? I don't think so. Piaffe's horse feels like any other horse but extremely thin coat(she also blankets him but his neck doesn't have much hair).He has like a chihuahua coat! He is super soft too.

I think the are trying to market the horse with any slightest resemblance of brindling to make a big buck. Are they going to call a dun a brindle as it's trait is to have the tiger stripes on it's leg?lol..i sure hope not!

They are rare to come by and I don't consider those true brindles!
     
    12-21-2010, 08:01 PM
  #6
Started
I have read a great book on horse color genetics, and of course brindle is one of the things talked about. To quote the book, who's quoting someone who's done extensive research into brindle horses, "Brindle horses have texturing in their coat, similar to that seen in some Appaloosa horses. The pattern seems to be inheritable especially in terms of coat texturing, but the extent of striping is highly variable" I liken it to what I feel when I'm grooming a clients paint horse. She doesn't have rain scald or anything, has been thoroughly looked over by a vet, but her white sections feel raised up higher than the colored sections of her coat, the coat feels the same softness, but just a bit of a bump up going from the colored to the white sections. It does say that some people mistake extensive dun markings for brindling, and that some horses are born with ghost markings (dun like, as well as brindle), but as they lose their foal coat, those markings disappear.
     
    12-21-2010, 08:09 PM
  #7
Started
Here's a link to a brindle breeders page. They also have links to other brindle articles.
Sharp Pillows: Brindle Horse Index Page
     
    12-21-2010, 08:24 PM
  #8
Green Broke
So people really do mistaken dun markings for being brindled?
     
    12-21-2010, 08:31 PM
  #9
Started
Apparently. How I don't know. Personally to me, I think its normally pretty darn obvious if your horse is brindled. Now being a brindle CARRIER is a different matter. Then you are looking for other signs then the coat color.
     
    12-21-2010, 09:02 PM
  #10
Green Broke
I think we need to be fair to the brindle breeders out there. It is still new territory, we just don't know much about the specifics of how it works. There is a lot going on in terms of genetics to make a horse the colour it is. Take for example two chestnuts. Genetically, they both are homozygous for red. But add sooty, and suddenly you have two very different looking horses. Or flaxen. We still don't understand how flaxen is inherited either.

It could be that there is other genes that are changing the display of brindle.
     

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