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Silver Bay?

This is a discussion on Silver Bay? within the Horse Colors and Genetics forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        05-06-2013, 03:55 AM
      #11
    Trained
    With one grey parent, it can be hard to judge if a horse if "flaxen chestnut going grey" or silver bay. They can mimic each other to a certain extent - it is not uncommon for greys to go darker on the extremities especially before they start to lighten up. I do think in this case silver is a definite possibility, based on the later pictures, but that grey shouldn't be ruled out yet. She is, after all, only a yearling.

    Clipped horses, as stated earlier, don't show true colour, so a clipped coat should never be used as an indicator of this.
         
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        05-06-2013, 07:12 AM
      #12
    Foal
    Unless the gray parent carried the silver gene she's likely not silver bay.

    However because she has dark points on her legs ( she looks wild bay to me with the "broken" patches in her black markings ) with the light mane and tail rather than black it's likely she is silver bay. From my understanding of the gene Mini's and Shetlands are carriers and most likely breed to express the silver gene.

    Either way with one gray parent depending on whether that parent was dominant for the gray gene ( GG ) or recessive ( Gg ) as the gray gene is what's called a "dominant gene" meaning it takes only the one copy to express. If the parent is dominant your filly WILL gray out so it won't matter if she's a Silver carrier or not. If the parent is recessive you have a 50-50% chance of a gray mare in adulthood.

    I recommend getting them genetically tested for both Gray and Silver genes in case you plan to breed her.



    As a side note it does not matter if a grandparent is a specific color. If the parent does not carry that gene then the foal will not inherit it. For example ::

    Gen. 1 pair || Chestnut Grandsire x Gray on Chestnut Granddam ( tested dominant GG )
    100% Chestnut Foal that WILL gray out

    Gen. 2 || Chestnut + Gray ( ee/aa/Gg ) x Bay ( E_/A_ )
    50% chance Black
    50% chance Chestnut
    50% chance Gray on any result
    50% chance bay
    Lets say THIS foal ended up Bay with no gray

    Gen. 3 || Bay ( E_/A_ ) x Bay ( E_/A_ ) - depending on if one or both is DOMINANT for black or bay ( EE or AA ) the foal could result as
    Chestnut ( ee )
    Liver chestnut ( ee/Aa or ee/AA )
    Black ( Ee or EE )
    Bay ( Aa or AA )

    However because neither of the above parents carries Gray the foal cannot inherit the gray gene. The gene has to be in the immediate parent in order to pass on. This is good knowledge to know if you plan on breeding in the future because it will help you decide what to pair your filly up to ( for example if she IS a bay/silver bay and you pair her to a buckskin, cremello or perlino you could end up with a buckskin or silver buckskin from the breeding ).
         

    Tags
    bay, chestnut, grey, miniature, silver

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