What color is she? - Page 4
 
 

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What color is she?

This is a discussion on What color is she? within the Horse Colors and Genetics forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        02-16-2013, 04:32 AM
      #31
    Started
    Pretty I agree sooty Chesnut dominant white or sabino. Very pretty!
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        02-16-2013, 11:42 AM
      #32
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Chiilaa    
    I wonder if she could be dominant white instead of sabino. It just has that look to me which makes me wonder.
    What does dominant white mean?
         
        02-16-2013, 01:15 PM
      #33
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Poseidon    
    That's sabino and sooty. The manes on Fjords is caused by their "version" of dun that's specific to Fjords. Non-dun Fjords (which do exist) have solid manes and tails. The OP's mare isn't a dun.
    Not sure if this is true, but if it is they would not be allowed into the registry. Registered Fjords must have DNA tests done to prove that the parentage is true and that they carry all required traits, which includes dun.
    Way back when the breed was first being developed, the majority were not dun, but over the past hundred years the breeding has been closely regulated to make sure that the gene is passed on to all foals.
    White markins as well are prohibited, and only mares are allowed to have stars but nothing more.
         
        02-16-2013, 02:29 PM
      #34
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PreciousPony    
    What does dominant white mean?
    Dominant White is another white pattern like Tobiano, Sabino, Frame, etc. It seems to be somewhat random in that two completely solid parents could produce a very loud Dominant White foal out of nowhere. Someone else like Chiilaa could explain it better than I (especially considering I'm too tired to even look up more information for you).

    Dominant White can cause markings that can look very much like Sabino. Puchilingui is a rather well-known DW stallion. DWs in extreme can often be completely white.
         
        02-16-2013, 03:31 PM
      #35
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Reno Bay    
    Dominant White is another white pattern like Tobiano, Sabino, Frame, etc. It seems to be somewhat random in that two completely solid parents could produce a very loud Dominant White foal out of nowhere. Someone else like Chiilaa could explain it better than I (especially considering I'm too tired to even look up more information for you).

    Dominant White can cause markings that can look very much like Sabino. Puchilingui is a rather well-known DW stallion. DWs in extreme can often be completely white.
    Oh my god Puchilingui is gorgeous!
         
        02-16-2013, 11:03 PM
      #36
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lilruffian    
    Not sure if this is true, but if it is they would not be allowed into the registry. Registered Fjords must have DNA tests done to prove that the parentage is true and that they carry all required traits, which includes dun.
    Way back when the breed was first being developed, the majority were not dun, but over the past hundred years the breeding has been closely regulated to make sure that the gene is passed on to all foals.
    White markins as well are prohibited, and only mares are allowed to have stars but nothing more.
    No, I highly doubt they'd be registered, but I would like to see their reaction if a non-dun was DNA tested and proven to be the offspring of two otherwise normal Fjords. The NFHR is very picky about what they allow to be registered though. They frown even on whatever name they gave double cream dilutes. They're also very strict on inbreeding and do not allow registration of inbred horses.
         
        02-17-2013, 12:06 PM
      #37
    Green Broke
    No, yes they are pretty strict but so are many registries that are trying to keep their breed pure. Thoroughbreds cannot even be registered if the foal was artificially inseminated.
         
        02-17-2013, 06:58 PM
      #38
    Weanling
    Though it's really hard to tell, my initial reaction was silver bay roan sabiono. Many on here have posted sooty chestnut, and it's often difficult to tell the difference from a silver bay and a sooty chestnut (especially if the colouring isn't strong), but here are my reasons for my guess. A silver bay is still a bay, meaning that it will still have it's black or dark points on its legs, mane, and tail. However the silver mutes it, and when accompanied with roan, appears a dull, dirty grey. In the case of your horse, she still has a mixture of black hairs in her mane, and her legs (especially the back of the hinds) looks significantly darker than other points of her coat. Also, when clipped a bay will often come out looking almost greyish (kind of like a grullo) where as a chestnut will come out peachy coloured. Because in the picture where you say she is clipped her body looks darker (and more grey) rather than lighter (and more peach), that's making me think she has a bay base.

    All that being said, the two colours are still very similar, and a genetic test is the only thing that will tell you with certainty what she is.
         
        02-17-2013, 10:05 PM
      #39
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ponypile    
    Though it's really hard to tell, my initial reaction was silver bay roan sabiono. Many on here have posted sooty chestnut, and it's often difficult to tell the difference from a silver bay and a sooty chestnut (especially if the colouring isn't strong), but here are my reasons for my guess. A silver bay is still a bay, meaning that it will still have it's black or dark points on its legs, mane, and tail. However the silver mutes it, and when accompanied with roan, appears a dull, dirty grey. In the case of your horse, she still has a mixture of black hairs in her mane, and her legs (especially the back of the hinds) looks significantly darker than other points of her coat. Also, when clipped a bay will often come out looking almost greyish (kind of like a grullo) where as a chestnut will come out peachy coloured. Because in the picture where you say she is clipped her body looks darker (and more grey) rather than lighter (and more peach), that's making me think she has a bay base.

    All that being said, the two colours are still very similar, and a genetic test is the only thing that will tell you with certainty what she is.
    Thanks for the response! I kind of think you're right in saying she's silver bay, because I google searched sabino chestnuts and they had similar markings but they all looked much redder than she does. A lot of the bays looked darker than her, but I think they look closer to her color than the chestnuts. Your point about the body clipped color makes sense too.

    How can you get a genetic test done? Is it expensive?
         
        02-17-2013, 10:18 PM
      #40
    Trained
    $25 per test. Sabino 1 is the only form of sabino testable, but there 2 variations of Dominant White currently available. If you had the extra cash, you could do both for $50.

    Horse Testing - Equine Genetic Testing
         

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