9 month old Georgian Grande - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Conformation Critique

9 month old Georgian Grande

This is a discussion on 9 month old Georgian Grande within the Horse Conformation Critique forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

    Like Tree19Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        04-07-2013, 08:27 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    As an aside... While most Standies pace and most ASB's do not gait... Some Standies do not pace at all (hence the two racing styles - trotters and pacers) and some ASBs are gaited (hence 3 gaited and 5 gaited divisions ) ... Just to muck the comparison up a bit.

    I happen to think ASBs tend to look and move with more elegance, but I have had the chance to meet some stunning, talented, Standardbreds too, ones which you can really see the distant relatives they have in common.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        04-08-2013, 01:02 AM
      #12
    Trained
    Despite the differences though, IME the two breeds are quite similar. The ASB is a LOT sexier [hence me referring to it as the Ferrari], and just has more appeal as a whole. The STB, while common and often decidedly unattractive to look at, is a nice ride [when it's not pacing LOL, that pace is the most uncomfortable gait to ride...], and typically a very family-friendly type of horse.

    I love the STB breed, my next project horse will probably be one [I can't afford a good, unspoiled Saddlebred and they aren't usually the sort of horse that ends up naughty enough to be offloaded cheap, least not around here], but they do tend to lack a certain elegance. If you're lucky enough to find one that can actually canter properly, and not that four-beat half-pace thing they tend towards, they make decent dressage horses, good eventers, and great showjumpers, it's just a matter of finding a really good one!

    ...there's a Standie across the road at the moment that I really want when she finishes racing... but if she's as quick on the track as she is in the pasture, they'll retire her to the breeding barn, not to some "pleasure rider" who only wants her for the purpose of gaining experience. Moves straight and correct, conformation is decent, ugliest head I have EVER seen but you don't ride the head. And that trot is just incredible.

    How did we get here? LOL.

    Back on topic now, I want to steal your little big guy. Seriously.
    TheLastUnicorn likes this.
         
        04-08-2013, 09:17 AM
      #13
    Green Broke
    Here is what I mean about the shoulder which he has inherited from his dam (along with the lower neck set common to draft horses). The point of shoulder needs to be higher and the shoulder more laid back. Blue is what he is. Red is roughly what he should be but is not. BTW I did this quickly and the red is not as accurate as I would like but you get the idea.

    The photo of the dam running shows about as high as she can lift her knee. Both together over a fence? Probably not that high. Same for the colt. The sire appears to have a higher neck set and a more laid back shoulder.

    That is why I asked what you plan to do. I expect this colt is nice but not a higher level dressage or jumper prospect. Nice enough horse.
    Attached Images
    File Type: jpg EoganandHogganConformationandActionMarch292013-17.jpg (65.5 KB, 114 views)
    TheLastUnicorn likes this.
         
        04-08-2013, 10:32 AM
      #14
    Yearling
    Thanks Elana, I think you just used terms I'm less familiar with. I understand now.

    No, this boy is not destined for any high level discipline, was never meant to be. Originally I was hoping for a solid mount I could use as part of my lesson program, down the road... His height may (or may not) make him less desirable for that (for us, many of my students find his dam too tall - which was why I went with the much smaller sire)

    The colt, while not as scopey as I might hope for (shame, daddy can lift his Knees around his ears), has spring loaded legs and frequently opts to jump whatever he finds laying about in his pasture (brush, logs, dips in the ground... Sadly his gate a couple times :( ) ... If he doesn't lose that with maturity he might make an decent enough jumper (again, not aiming him GP)

    Blue Eyes - where are you located? I am part of an ASB sporthorse group who frequently puts up ads for ASBs needing "rescue". I have seen most going for less than $500 (they often need TLC, but many are at least broke to drive, and do a ride through at auction)
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        04-08-2013, 01:33 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    I'm excited to see your guy grow up! I've only heard a few things about GGs in the past. But I agree with the OP that ASB get sold short. Why do ASB get a bad rap? I have heard they do well as saddle horses (even dressage/jumping). But I have also heard they are known to have weak backs?
         
        04-08-2013, 02:46 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smguidotti    
    I'm excited to see your guy grow up! I've only heard a few things about GGs in the past. But I agree with the OP that ASB get sold short. Why do ASB get a bad rap? I have heard they do well as saddle horses (even dressage/jumping). But I have also heard they are known to have weak backs?
    The American Saddlebred is probably currently best known for it's performance in Saddleseat, as such, it seems to have been forgotten by a lot of riders from other disciplines, in spite of once being a popular mount (according to some long time breed fans they faded when the European Warmbloods started to make their debut here in North America, not necessarily for lesser ability, but because they were no longer the "fad of the day"... I'm not sure that is entirely accurate, but that is what I have been told)

    The "modern" Saddlebred has, in some cases been so overly bred with amount of "trot" being placed above conformation that the breed is now becoming known for serious conformation faults such as lordosis (sway back), crooked legs, long loins, long backs, light bone etc. by breeders who just don't "know better". These horses often end up more or less low level horses, even in Saddleseat... And so they are often what a base majority of sport riders see trying "new" things, and being, obviously unimpressed.

    This type of breeding is not done by the breeders at the top of the discipline though, and so you can find well built individuals without too much trouble. The issue can be purchasing them before they have been trained to move incorrectly for sport - Saddleseat shows off the horse's scope, and athleticsm but not in the same way a Dressage horse or Jumper will. As a result once they are trained for Saddleseat they would need to undergo a lot of retraining to teach them how to move correctly for their new job. There are a few breeders who do not breed for the show ring, and a few SS breeders who will see a foal has less talent for the show ring and aim it for other disciplines... Many will still train it for Saddleseat because that's all they really know.

    Less educated people will see the horse moving "upsidedown" and with short high strides and think the horse is ill suited for anything else.

    In reality, many Saddlebreds are quite capable of excelling in many different disciplines (the same conformation which allows them to move snappy and high also gives them scope for fences, and most are also able to lengthen their stride as well), and do so when they have been properly conditioned for their job, the thing is, less than 3000 Saddlebreds are registered every year in the US (compared to 300,000 or so Quarter Horses , 100,000 or so Paints, 100,000 or so TBs - I used to have the exact stats, but they aren't handy) and most of those are being used for Saddleseat or other ASHA breed showing, as until recently ASHA (American Saddlebred Horse Association) did not actively promote the breed for open divisions or reward members for showing in open divisions. (In the last few years they have begun an open division reward program to promote what is otherwise a quickly disappearing breed to riders outside the breed)

    There are some breed fans who are actively trying to get ASB horses back into the open divisions with success, and hopefully this will help win back some popularity for what is really a lovely breed option!

    Sorry for the novel... Quite obviously I really like Saddlebreds
    smguidotti likes this.
         
        04-08-2013, 07:41 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    Thank you! I have actually always admired the breed. I remember a long time ago at a ranch I was riding at had a 42 year-old ASB. He seemed to have much older breeding to him as compared to the popular type you see now a days that is often associated with the flaws you described.

    But every other ASB I have encountered had a quirky but pleasant disposition and Beautiful gaits. I'm disappointed I haven't gotten to ride one yet!
         
        04-08-2013, 08:25 PM
      #18
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smguidotti    
    Thank you! I have actually always admired the breed. I remember a long time ago at a ranch I was riding at had a 42 year-old ASB. He seemed to have much older breeding to him as compared to the popular type you see now a days that is often associated with the flaws you described.

    But every other ASB I have encountered had a quirky but pleasant disposition and Beautiful gaits. I'm disappointed I haven't gotten to ride one yet!
    At 42 he would likely be an "older style" bred horse, yes. I have been told ASBs that have strong ties to the stallion Denmark tend to be a bit heavier boned and shorter backed with fewer instances of lordosis than some other lines... But I am sure there are exceptions.

    Once you ride one you might find yourself addicted.
         
        04-08-2013, 08:28 PM
      #19
    Showing
    Lardosis in ASBs goes back almost as old as the breed.
         
        04-08-2013, 08:55 PM
      #20
    Trained
    TLU, I'm in Australia :/ the breed isn't very common here, it IS present but not common. I know of one breeder, there are others of course because the odd ASB does come up for sale from someone other than that breeder that doesn't have bloodlines that come from that breeder but I don't know of them.

    That breeder's stud Fame's Nitro [imported from the US] is really something else. 17hh and pure gorgeous. Consistently sires a really stunning type, to all sorts of different mares of all sorts of different types, so his breeding is really quite prepotent. IIRC he's homozygous tobiano, and I've never seen a red-based foal from him. Unfortunately my filly doesn't compliment him AT ALL, so he's not on the list of potential future husbands for her IF she ever gets bred, which is a real shame because as I said I do love the breed.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Grande Prairie Alberta? Mochachino Horse Talk 3 03-28-2013 04:31 PM
    Introducing Lyric ~ Georgian Grande Mare CinderEve Horse Pictures 36 02-13-2012 12:00 AM
    Rio Grande Nutty Saddler Miniature Horses 10 04-03-2011 02:20 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:48 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0